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Classic BoatClassic Boat

Classic Boat

July 2019

Admire the world's most beautiful boats, brought to life through breath-taking photography. Classic Boat offers a unique blend of yacht reviews, seamanship and restoration features, history and design columns, practical advice and coverage of the leading international regattas and events. Whether your interest lies in working on restoration projects or sailing in classic regattas; whether you're a wooden boat owner or simply an admirer of traditional marine workmanship, Classic Boat will have something for you.

Pays:
United Kingdom
Langue:
English
Éditeur:
Chelsea Magazine
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access_time1 min.
dinghy to j-class

Thirty years ago in this magazine, we featured the restoration of the Herreshoff schooner Vagrant for owner Peter de Savary, followed just a few pages later by the 2,000-year history of the fi shing oracle. It's a juxtaposition that we sometimes refer to as "dinghy to J-Class" and now here we are in 2019, and the theme lives on. The big-money boat – the 'J Class' – this time around is the lovely spirit-of-tradition yacht Anna, designed and built (in timber), in that most marine of places, the state of Maine. The dinghy is the Seahopper folding tender, once very popular. If you sailed in the 70s or 80s, you might remember the Seahopper. No doubt many, leant against garage walls across the land, still wait to spread their plywood…

access_time12 min.
rigged to perfection

The Getting Afloat page in the June 2012 issue of Classic Boat featured a boat called Cynthia, a centenarian which was described as “still sailing and still largely original, although in want of a good ‘tidy up’”. Among those who read this was Peter Lucas who had first seen Cynthia when he was a schoolboy on holiday with his parents on the Isle of Wight. “We used to go religiously to watch the start of the yacht racing on the Squadron line,” he told me, “and I used to see this strange green boat with really nice lines.” Some years later in 1978, Peter started a Dartmouth-based rigging business. In the early 1990s, he was awarded the contract to rig and service the 10 boats built to compete in Chay Blyth’s…

access_time3 min.
antigua classic 2019

“She is just so special,” Konrad Kaltenbach told me. “The wood, the crew, how she goes through the water. She takes you back in time.” “What you feel is the boat’s heart,” added wife Lea. The three of use were talking in the doghouse of the 115ft (35m) Bermudan staysail schooner Eros, after a day’s racing. Americans Konrad and Lea were among eight charter guests and were having the time of their lives. They first sailed on Eros during the 2017 America’s Cup in Bermuda and they were now planning a third time, probably in autumn in Newport. Originally called Jeanry, Eros was designed by William McKeek and built by Brooke Marine in Lowestoft for an American owner in 1939. Soon after she was launched she was commandeered by the Royal Navy…

access_time2 min.
first race for classic schooners

The Gulf of Naples took on a northern European feel for the inaugural Capri Classica schooner races in May, with an overcast sky, Vesuvius obscured by the murk, and a dark grey cloud over Capri’s highest summit giving the appearance that the island was about to erupt. The cold front brought conditions that made for spectacular imagery over the four-day event, with winds at times gusting above 25 knots. Witnessing Mariette of 1915’s 138ft (42m) and 180 tonnes thundering downwind at 12 knots, under full canvas, including her fisherman, blasting apart the substantial seas that were otherwise hammering Capri’s southern shore, was a sight to behold, reported James Boyd for the International Maxi Association who oversaw the event. Capri Classica is a new event that forms part of the new Schooner Cup…

access_time2 min.
mayflower ii refit update

The Brixham-built replica of the Pilgrims' Mayflower II is nearing the end of her extensive Mystic Seaport museum refit. The historic vessel was lifted out of the water in 2014 for the refit to begin, and Mayflower II has been a fascinating work in progress for visitors to Mystic in the intervening years. Skilled shipwrights from the Plimoth Plantation museum and Mystic have been working to systematically replace timbers, planking, structural frames, knees and beams that, despite the attention of Plimoth Plantation maritime staff, had succumbed to the elements. The works are scheduled to finish in time for the quadricentennial celebrations of the Pilgrim Fathers’ 1620 Massachusetts landing next year, when Mayflower II (pictured above sailing in 2007) will return to her home berth at Plimoth Plantation, and be the…

access_time3 min.
windermere jetty museum opens its doors

IN the early part of the 20th century, a boat – abandoned in a field in the Lake District – was being used by hens as their home for egg laying. If only the birds had known the significance of their abode. When retrieved in 1934, it turned out to be a one-time sailing yacht, built around 1780 for local big-wigs, the Curwens, who lived on Belle Isle, the only inhabited island on Lake Windermere. They had used the boat, which measured 7.7m, for sailing and racing. Once rescued, it was later bought and renovated by George Pattinson, a boat devotee, who in 1977 set up a steamboat museum on the side of England's largest lake. Sadly, the little museum ran out of money and was, over the years, part…

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