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category_outlined / Aviation et Bateau
PassageMakerPassageMaker

PassageMaker

Jul/Aug 2019

PassageMaker Magazine (PMM) is the market leader covering the boats, people, gear, and destinations for the trawler and cruising-under-power lifestyle. Over the years it has evolved to connect the marine industry to consumers through print, digital, online, and in-person brands (Trawler Fest, Trawler Fest University, and Trawler Port)

Pays:
United States
Langue:
English
Éditeur:
Active Interest Media
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8 Numéros

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access_time3 min.
the spirit of adventure

Editor-in-Chief In case you hadn’t heard, seafarers are doing some pretty neat things on the water lately. After 43 days at sea, Dan Lenard, co-founder of the Italian design firm Nuvolari Lenard, just completed a solo transatlantic expedition to raise awareness for ocean pollution. Even more impressive, his 33-foot sailing yacht, Scia, was built using recycled parts and had no engine, electronics, autopilot or compass, leaving Lenard to navigate the Atlantic Ocean entirely by sight, stars and the sun. As of this writing, the crew of a 47-foot Beneteau Swift Trawler is reportedly battling 12-footers on the nose as she heads south off of California’s notorious Cape Mendocino on a leg of the Swift Pacific Adventure, a Seattle-to-San Diego mission the builder created to put the boat’s espoused seaworthiness to the test. The owners…

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contributors

BOB ARRINGTON Diagnosed early in life as an incurable “aquaphile,” Bob Arrington finds most of his happiness on, in or under the water. A teacher and a storyteller at heart, Arrington shares his love of the water as a writer, a marine industry consultant, a boat training captain and a scuba instructor. Today, he and his photographer wife cruise extensively aboard their trawler, looking for the next story to tell. page 44 CHRIS CASWELL Winner of more than 50 marine journalism awards over his career, Chris Caswell hosted the weekly cable series Marine Voyager on the Speed Channel and Outdoor Life Networks. He’s also appeared on Oprah! as a boating lifestyle expert. “I’ve owned more boats than I want my wife or banker to know about,” he says of his fleet spanning both power…

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passagemaker

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Andrew Parkinson aparkinson@aimmedia.com ART DIRECTOR & MARINE GROUP PHOTOGRAPHER Jonathan Cooper jcooper@aimmedia.com DEPUTY MANAGING EDITOR Brian K. Lind brianlind@aimmedia.com ELECTRONICS EDITOR Ben Stein ben.stein@panbo.com TECHNICAL EDITOR Nigel Calder nigel.calder@gmail.com COPY EDITOR Kim Kavin CONTRIBUTORS Bob Arrington Chris Caswell Jonathan Cooper Dudley Dawson Phil Friedman Peter Greenberg Becca Guillote Kim Kavin Cecilia Kiely David Parkinson Dag Pike Robert Reeder Peter Swanson John Wooldridge Steve Zimmerman PUBLISHER Wade Luce wluce@aimmedia.com EASTERN SALES MANAGER Andrew Howe ahowe@aimmedia.com EVENT SALES & LOGISTICS MANAGER Ryan Davidson rdavidson@aimmedia.com ADVERTISING COORDINATOR Andrea Howey ahowey@aimmedia.com WEB ADMINISTRATOR Mary Lou Cooke mcooke@aimmedia.com MARINE GROUP PRESIDENT, GENERAL MANAGER Gary DeSanctis VP, MARKETING & EVENTS Julie Jarvie VP, EDITORIAL DIRECTOR William Sisson VP, DIGITAL DEVELOPMENT Eric Dallin BUSINESS MANAGER - MARINE Kelly Baumgardner PRODUCTION MANAGER Sunita Patel TRAFFIC COORDINATOR Sara Carpenter PRODUCTION COORDINATORS Chris Cirilli, Amy Pinto, Jennifer Williams EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, CONSUMER MARKETING Dana Raven CIRCULATION, FULFILLMENT MANAGER Cerisse Carpenter IT SUPPORT Colin Dehnert CEO & PRESIDENT Andrew W. Clurman COO, CFO & TREASURER Michael Henry CHIEF INNOVATION OFFICER Jonathan Dorn VP, AUDIENCE DEVELOPMENT Tom Masterson VP, CONTROLLER Devon Hopkins VP, IT Nelson Saenz VP OF PEOPLE & PLACES JoAnn Thomas ACTIVE INTEREST MEDIA BOARD CHAIRMAN Efrem Zimbalist III SINGLE COPY SALES MANAGER NPS…

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news & views

By the Numbers 1,329 Total nautical miles cruised by a Swift Trawler 47 to accomplish Beneteau’s Swift Pacific Adventure, an offshore passage arranged by the builder from Seattle to San Diego. Known for making a splash with new models through documented voyages, such as “The Greatest Loop” seven years ago, Beneteau encouraged the public to track the journey on its website with real-time photos, videos and a live captain’s log regularly updated by the crew along the way. Despite less-than-ideal cruising conditions at times along the 1,329-mile “proving ground,” the Swift Trawler 47 reportedly battled 10- to 12-footers on the nose—conditions that might have convinced many boats to wait it out—and the crew was duly rewarded by Mother Nature with whale sightings and sweeping views of the picturesque rain forests and rocky…

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kevin dolan

Survivor at Sea Every savvy sailor knows the potential perils of offshore cruising, but few people know those risks better than Seattleite Kevin Dolan. Having made the Pacific trip four times from Seattle to California as a delivery captain, it was Kevin’s fifth trip in 2007 that made him reevaluate ever doing it again. Kevin, recently engaged at the time, and his friend, Greg, were 80 miles offshore of the infamous California danger zone at Cape Mendocino when the Nauticat they were delivering to Mexico was broadsided by a massive wave. The wave broached the sloop, causing the starboard cabin windows to smash from the force of impact. Before the boat righted itself, the now-open portlights permitted green water to partially fill the hull. With no chance to keep up with manual…

access_time3 min.
size matters

What is the difference between a ship and a boat? It’s one of the questions I am most frequently asked. One would imagine that after several thousand years of seafaring, we’d have a simple and concise answer. We don’t. Most of the answers I’ve heard are somewhat true some of the time, but never true all of the time. Ships sometimes ride on larger ships; boats sometimes carry smaller boats. Some boats have multiple decks. Some ships lack permanent captains or crew, while some boats have both. And, like ships, larger multihull boats don’t heel much when they turn. Add to this the variety of new hull types that do not conform well (or at all) to traditional ship design, and the challenge of answering the question seems even more daunting. The fact…

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