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Prog

Prog

Issue 114

Since its arrival at the tail end of the 60s progressive rock has offered the world some of the most fascinating music ever heard, in varying guises over the years. Prog magazine brings you the stories behind the people who create these astounding sounds and amazing music, be they the classic originators such as Genesis, Pink Floyd and Yes, to the 80s revivalists such as Marillion and IQ, all the way through to those musicians today who have done so much to help rejuvenate the genre such as Muse, Radiohead, Steven Wilson, Opeth and Anathema. In depth and behind the scenes stories of classic albums and tours sit side by side with widespread coverage of what‘s happening at today’s cutting edge of progressive music.

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Pays:
United Kingdom
Langue:
English
Éditeur:
Future Publishing Ltd
Fréquence:
Monthly
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11 Numéros

dans ce numéro

1 min.
ed’s letter

Hello, and welcome to the new issue of Prog. I hope it finds you as well as can be expected. Reading Daryl Easlea’s fascinating cover story on Kate Bush’s 1980 album Never For Ever, I was most struck by one prominent fact: Never For Ever was the first studio album by a female artist to actually reach the No.1 spot in the UK album charts. Artists of the magnitude of Diana Ross and Barbra Streisand had both hit the top of the charts, but only with compilations. I find that quite astonishing given the wealth of amazing music that female performers have made over the years. Obviously things have moved on apace in the ensuing 40 years, but as last issue’s Greatest Prog Musicians Poll showed, attitudes towards female performers appear…

7 min.
bloody well write

OCEANS OF CHANGE I just wanted to say thank you for the feature on Oceans Of Slumber in Prog 113. I think that the eponymous new album is their best yet, building upon and developing further what they began with the previous two releases. And that voice! There is nothing quite like it in progressive rock, or any other musical genre come to that. Cammie Gilbert is a remarkable woman. Elsewhere in the magazine you lament the lack of female prog artists, so Cammie’s emergence into the limelight is to be welcomed in more than one respect. Although it has always been obvious that there is a deeply personal aspect to her song lyrics, I must say that, until I read this article, I hadn’t quite realised the true extent of it.…

1 min.
tweet talk

Follow us on twitter.com/progmagazineUK KAVUS TORABI @Knifeworld Music. Because honestly, at this point, what else is there? JAMES LABRIE @jameslabrie Started tracking a new solo album. This is not with Matt Guillory and company. That will happen but not at this point in time. This album is with another fine musician from Scotland. I’ll reveal his identity soon enough. We’re both very psyched with the tunes. Stay tuned. FROST* @Here_Be_Frost Needed a keyboard to work something out over the weekend while I was away… so courtesy of Argos Chichester, £38 later… a tribute to my first synth, the Casio VL Tone… played on its great great great great great great great great grandson – the Casio SA46! ROB COTTINGHAM @RobCottingham1 Sorry to read about Anathema. The music industry has been badly hit when most bands were struggling pre-Covid…

3 min.
jon anderson to release expanded song of seven

Jon Anderson is to release an expanded version of Song Of Seven via Esoteric on November 27. First launched in 1980, and representing quite a change in musical direction, Song Of Seven was his second solo album and his first after leaving Yes following 1978’s Tormato. The recordings have been digitally remastered from the original Atlantic Records tapes and expanded to include two bonus US single edits which, until now, have previously been unavailable on CD. “I was actually listening to For You, For Me from the album last week, just to check on what I was thinking in those days,” Anderson says. “And it’s pretty political – it’s an interesting song. The opposite of that was Take Your Time, which was a lovely sort of a sweet song. Sometimes you come…

1 min.
barre marks tull’s half-century

Martin Barre celebrates Jethro Tull’s half-century career with the release of his double CD 50 Years Of Jethro Tull through Store For Music on November 6. The former Tull guitarist and member of the band for 44 years from 1968 has carefully chosen songs from across his former group’s catalogue. “The tracks we’ve done are those that I enjoy playing the most. And also what’s fun for my band to perform,” he says. “We had a couple of days off last year when touring in America, so we went into this studio for a day and did it all live. What you hear was done pretty much in one take, although a couple of songs took two takes.” The first CD was recorded at the Factory Underground in New York, while the second…

1 min.
anathema stun fans by revealing hiatus

Anathema have left fans stunned by the announcement that they’re to go on indefinite hiatus. The band issued a statement citing “events over the last year” which had “left us with no option” but to “pursue other paths in life.” Earlier this year the band were forced to cancel tour dates due to Covid-19: “We don’t have money anymore. Not to pay the road crew, the bus company, the merchandise costs.” They added: “We cannot get summer jobs… Therefore we are broke. We all have rent to pay. None of us own homes.” In their latest and seemingly final statement the band state: “We are beyond grateful for everyone’s support over the years. There is no end to the love and respect we have for our fans for giving us the best…