UNCUT

January 2022

Published by BandLab UK Limited. Uncut is the essential magazine about rock music, written by people who love that music as much as you do. Every month, it features the most comprehensive and trustworthy album reviews section in the world. There are in-depth interviews with the finest musicians of the past five decades, and with the exciting new artists who are following in their great tradition. Insightful, informative, passionate about extraordinary music – that’s Uncut.

Pays:
United Kingdom
Langue:
English
Éditeur:
NME Networks
Fréquence:
Monthly
5,17 €(TVA Incluse)
39,40 €(TVA Incluse)
12 Numéros

dans ce numéro

2 min
editor

WELCOME to Uncut’s annual Review Of The Year. Across a special 31-page section in the magazine, we’ll run down our Top 75 New Albums, Top 30 Archive Releases, Top 30 Films and Top 20 Books. I’m pleased to report that the 49 contributors who took part in this year’s poll voted for a total of 431 new albums and 198 archival releases. These feel like remarkably healthy statistics – indicating that despite the challenges of the past 12 months, a lot of good music has made its way into the wild. Tied up with the poll, you’ll find new interviews with The Weather Station, Cassandra Jenkins, John Murry, Mogwai, Can’s Irmin Schmidt, Ryley Walker, The Beach Boys, Dry Cleaning and The Coral – all of whom have enjoyed a productive…

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2 min
feist among equals

WITH live music only just returning to Canada, it was understandable that everyone in Toronto’s Meridian Hall seemed a tad tentative as Leslie Feist finished “After After Party”, the first of 11 new songs comprising her new show Multitudes. “Are we all a little bit out of practice doing this concert thing?” she asked, directing the question at herself as much as anyone else. But as the hour-long set unfolded, it became clear that this was not quite a return to normal. Developed by Feist with Rob Sinclair – the concert and lighting designer whose credits include David Byrne’s American Utopia – Multitudes subverted concert formats to create something both idiosyncratic and intimate. It was born of what she calls “a double reassessment”, both in terms of her identity as a…

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3 min
the king of strings

“I STARTED by looking at the music of the ’80s that Diana would have liked, but it’s a bit of a cul-de-sac…” Jonny Greenwood is explaining his crabwise approach to composing his latest soundtrack. Spencer, by Chilean director Pablo Larraín, is set across three unhappy days in the life of Princess Diana (Kristen Stewart) one Christmas at Sandringham, and is, according to Greenwood, “weirdly like a horror film. It’s more claustrophobic and dark; all the things The Crown isn’t.” Greenwood’s looming, atonal string scores for films such as There Will Be Blood and Phantom Thread have been rightly acclaimed, and his standalone compositions have even been performed at the Proms. Casting out the baggage of traditional orchestration from so many costume dramas, on Spencer he actively demolishes the sounds of a…

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3 min
“we had no idea what would happen”

WHEN David Bowie was asked to contribute to Rolling Stone’s ‘Millennium Special’ in December 1999, he chose to shine a light on “one of the finest fucking rock bands of their time… buried without trace. They’re as important as anybody else who’s ever been, ever.” That band was Fanny, one of rock’s first all-female outfits, who are subjects of a new documentary, The Right To Rock. “David was a loyal friend and loyal fan,” says Fanny’s lead guitarist, June Millington. “He understood the gravity of our situation, the preciousness and fragility of Fanny and our status in rock.” Fanny were formed in California in 1969, signing to Reprise and releasing five hard-rocking albums. 1972’s Fanny Hill – named after their communal house in LA – was recorded at Apple Studios with…

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3 min
these yarns of mine

“DID I tell you the one about the bail bondsman who tried to hire someone to kill Ronnie Van Zant?” begins Alan Walden, with a mischievous glint in his eye. The 78-year-old was Lynyrd Skynyrd’s tour manager in the 1970s, which means he had his hands full. “Ronnie had beat this guy up, stole his girl, so he put some money down with a hitman. Well, it turned out that the guy he hired was a better friend to Ronnie, so he told the band to get the hell out of town for a while.” “Otis and I used to go squirrel hunting together” Walden had them drive up from Jacksonville to Macon, Georgia, where he ran a management and publishing company. “I spent the afternoon making dum dums – taking a…

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1 min
a quick one

I’ll be your mirror! As their definitive career documentary airs, we present The Ultimate Music Guide to The Velvet Underground. Covering everything from the legendary albums to the reunion and their enduring legacy. Plus in-depth coverage of important work by Nico and John Cale, and writing by Jonathan Richman! It’s in shops from November 18… Our latest online exclusive is a very special edition: Curated By Sleaford Mods. Jason and Andrew select choice items from our archives, reveal their influences and give us the fullest account yet of their story so far. Get yours direct from Uncut . co.uk/single with free UK p&p… Missed Bill Murray’s 2018 world tour where he covered the likes of Tom Waits and Van Morrison with cellist Jan Vogler? Never fear, because New Worlds, a film of…

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