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Yachting WorldYachting World

Yachting World Jan-2019

Published by Time Inc. (UK) Ltd Yachting World is world's leading international yachting magazine. From ocean racing and blue water cruising to the most glamorous super-yachts, Yachting World has the very best in nautical writing and stunning photography, with up-to-the-minute technical reports, race analysis, new boat tests and much more.

Pays:
United Kingdom
Langue:
English
Éditeur:
TI-Media
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age of experience

“When Francis leaves to go to sea, even around the world, it looks like he’s going to pick strawberries from his garden.” This is how fellow French solo sailor JP Dick once described the imperturbable Francis Joyon. A seaman to his fingertips, Joyon won the Route du Rhum by defeating François Gabart, the previously unbeatable ocean racer half his age. Joyon’s was not a new boat; it did not have foils. And (in typical Joyon fashion) he did not pose for publicity shoots, blog, vlog, or court celebrity interviews. He doesn’t really care about any of that. When experience trumps technology, it feels like quite a satisfying twist. Right now, we are in a golden age of sailing superstars. Loïck Peyron (left) also springs to mind, racing his little yellow trimaran Happy.…

access_time1 min.
picture this

A galaxy of ice Drawing a path through the ice, Oyster 62 Uhuru picks her way through the bergy bits of the Antarctic Peninsula. Briton Steve Powell made this voyage, part of a longer circuit of the North and South Atlantic between 2008 and 2013. Powell left from Lymington and sailed to the Med, then across the Atlantic to the Caribbean, to the US east coast, then Cuba, the Amazon basin, Brazil, down the coast of South America to Ushuaia and across the Drake Passage to Antarctica. Read about preparing for remote cruising, cold climates and high latitudes on page 52. Surfing home Dutch sailor Frank Werst’s Swan 53, Silveren Swaen, surges to the finish of the Rolex Middle Sea Race. The race from Malta in October is one of the classic offshore ‘600-milers’ and…

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us team flies test foiler

US America’s Cup challenger American Magic is the second team to launch a test foiling monohull. The New York Yacht Club’s challenge has been practising out of Newport, Rhode Island, in a 38ft modified McConaghy one-design, and it has been seen fully foiling in Narragansett Bay. Nicknamed ‘the Mule’ (the name given to test prototypes in the car industry), the US test foiler is substantially larger than the modified Quant 28 being sailed and evaluated by Ben Ainslie’s Ineos Team UK. The Mule is a stripped out version of the 38-footer with a soft wingsail and self-tacking jib, and has separate cockpits on each side for helmsman Dean Barker and five other crew. Training crew include Britons Paul Goodison and Ian Moore, New Zealanders Sean Clarkson, Joe Spooner, Jim Turner and…

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on the wind

Yacht of the Year Niklas Zenström’s Fast 40+ Rán VII has been crowned Royal Ocean Racing Club yacht of the year. The arresting looking Shaun Carkeek design, with its radical hull shape and eye-catching chamfered bow, dominated every event in the 2018 Fast 40 season. Rope from plastic Marlow Ropes have developed new rope in 12-16mm diameters made from 100% recycled waste plastic bottles. The Blue Ocean Dockline is part of the company’s environmental policy. Around 16 million plastic bottles a year end up in landfill in the UK alone. Female crew for Sydney Hobart This year’s Rolex Sydney Hobart Race will have its first ever all-female professional team, with backing from ocean health and sustainability organisation 11th Hour Racing. A 13-strong crew skippered by Australian Stacey Jackson will race Wild Oats X and features…

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olympics replace finn

In a controversial move, World Sailing has voted for an offshore event to replace the mixed one-person dinghy class at the 2024 Olympic Games. After a somewhat confusing decision-making process (the original submission was rejected by the World Sailing Council after being two votes short in May, but then supported at the annual conference in November), World Sailing has voted in a mixed two-person offshore keelboat class for the 2024 Olympic Games. The 2024 Games will be hosted in Paris with the Olympic regatta held out of Marseille. The planned offshore class will race over a three-day and two-night race, with mixed double-handed crews. This will make offshore sailing the longest event in the entire Olympic Games. The decision will end a 68-year tenure for the Finn, traditionally the men’s heavyweight dinghy class.…

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van den heede pitchpoled

Golden Globe leader Jean-Luc Van Den Heede is continuing racing despite his yacht being pitchpoled and suffering rigging damage. On 6 November, in 65-knot conditions with 11m seas some 1,800 miles west of Chile, Van Den Heede had thoroughly prepared his Rustler 36 Matmut for knockdowns, including screwing down floorboards as well as stowing everything possible away. “He was in his bunk,” explained race chairman Don McIntyre, “and his storm tactic was to allow the boat to run freely downwind with 6m of headsail set and no warps trailing astern, steered by his Hydrovane wind vane self-steering. “Suddenly, the boat was picked up by a huge wave and surfed down the forward face, the bows dug in and the boat went end-for-end before rolling out on her side. Van Den Heede, 73, was thrown…

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