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Bloomberg Businessweek

Bloomberg Businessweek August 12, 2019

Each issue of Businessweek features in-depth perspectives on the financial markets, industries, trends, technology and people guiding the economy. Get the digital magazine subscription today and draw upon Businessweek's timely incisive analysis to help you make better decisions about your career, your business, and your personal investments.

Land:
United States
Taal:
English
Uitgever:
Bloomberg Finance LP
Verschijningsfrequentie:
Weekly
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50 Edities

in deze editie

2 min.
in brief

India revoked the autonomy of Kashmir. The status has existed for seven decades. The move, which gives India complete control over the state’s local police machinery, risks rekindling tensions with Pakistan, raising the possibility of a renewed insurgency in the troubled region. Pakistan suspended bilateral trade in response. AmerisourceBergen, Cardinal Health, and McKesson have proposed paying $10 billion to settle claims they helped to fuel the U.S. opioid epidemic—the first sign of progress in resolving state lawsuits against the drug distributors, according to people familiar with the negotiations. John Flint, CEO of HSBC, was abruptly ousted after 18 months, with the bank seeking new leadership in a climate it calls “increasingly complex.” HSBC said it plans to cut more than 4,000 jobs. French inventor Franky Zapata successfully flew across the English Channel on a…

4 min.
don’t let this moment pass

Maybe this time will be different. That’s the thought on the minds of many Americans now. Two mass shootings in 24 hours have left 31 people murdered and many dozens more wounded. This, just a few days after a shooter at a festival in California killed three and wounded a dozen. Other shooting sprees over the past week have also left people dead, dozens wounded, and communities shaken. President Donald Trump addressed the nation but failed to mention the two most important words in this debate: background checks. While he said he supports a federal red-flag law, which allows law enforcement to remove guns from those who pose serious mental health risks, he’s yet to push for it. And he pinned more blame on video games and the internet than on our…

8 min.
weak yuan, cheap exports strong yuan, pricey exports when all else fails, raise tariffs

President Donald Trump has bragged repeatedly, in tweets and press conferences, that China is absorbing the cost of U.S. tariffs on Chinese products. He said it again on Aug. 5, tweeting that “it is now even more obvious to everyone that Americans are not paying for the Tariffs—they are being paid for compliments of China, and the U.S. is taking in tens of Billions of Dollars!” Trump happens to be wrong about this, but set that aside for a moment and focus on his desideratum. He seems to be saying that he wants Chinese companies to cut the prices they charge by an amount equal to the tariffs to keep their customers unaffected. In his beautiful vision, Chinese companies would bear the full cost of the tariffs. Add the federal government’s…

6 min.
the unfulfilled promise of on-demand birth control

Since the contraceptive pill transformed women’s lives almost 60 years ago, there’s been precious little innovation in birth control for women. Now a company in San Diego claims to be on the verge of something that could advance the field: a gel women can apply an hour before sex, without having to mess with their hormones. “There hasn’t been innovation in this category in decades,” Evofem Biosciences Inc. Chief Executive Officer Saundra Pelletier says. “It’s time that women have the opportunity to have sex on demand, like men have had with condoms for years.” That’s a powerful message. But look more closely and Evofem’s product, Amphora, is also a case study in why real advances in birth control are so rare. With plenty of consumer interest in an easier-to-manage female contraceptive,…

4 min.
package tours are no picnic

For decades, tour operators such as TUI, Kuoni, and Thomas Cook thrived by offering package holidays to sun-starved Europeans put off by unfamiliar tongues, foreign currencies, and hotel reservations made from afar. But now the euro has eased money concerns, discount airlines will fly northerners to warmer climes for the cost of lunch, and beachfront accommodations are just a few mouse clicks away—no language skills needed. At the same time, terrorism, political turmoil, and hotter summers in the north have kept many would-be travelers at home. The shift has squeezed profits at tour operators and forced long-standing players from the field. French stalwart Club Med went on the block in 2015 and ended up in the hands of Fosun Tourism Group from China. Switzerland’s Kuoni in 2015 sold its tour operations…

5 min.
where cadillac and lincoln are still cool

The streets of Beijing are teeming with German luxury cars, but Cindy Zhang wanted something different—something that reminded her of the muscular vehicles she sees on American TV shows like the spy thriller Homeland. So she bought a boldly styled Cadillac XT5 SUV in a color dubbed red passion. “The vehicle looks pretty solid and makes me feel safer,” says Zhang, 29, a primary school teacher. “I don’t know whether those scenes with American cars in the shows helped me with the choice, but it felt natural and right.” The well-wheeled in China are increasingly embracing American luxury brands—the bigger, the better—with Cadillac crossovers and Lincoln SUVs flying off dealer lots. The country has already become General Motors Co.’s largest market for Cadillac, overtaking the U.S. in 2017, and Ford Motor…