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Golf Monthly

Golf Monthly September 2019

Published by TI Media Limited Golf Monthly is the market-leading magazine brand in the UK in a sport that continues to grow and grow. Golf Monthly is a lively and welcoming brand targeted at good golfers who are regular players - and keen to get even better. With over 100 years of heritage and authority behind it, it represents the real 'voice of golf' with leading columnists, top players and unrivalled coverage of equipment and instruction. The Golf Monthly brand also has a strong and growing presence in digital publishing, with a popular website delivering over 1 million page impressions each month, and a strong following on the key social media platforms.

Land:
United Kingdom
Taal:
English
Uitgever:
TI-Media
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13 Edities

in deze editie

2 min.
big hit or big miss?

Until recently I’d never been affected by ‘FOMO’ – Fear Of Missing Out – defined as “anxiety that an exciting or interesting event may currently be happening elsewhere, often aroused by posts on social media”. But during Open week I had it bad. For several reasons I couldn’t be in Portrush and early in the week became increasingly despondent as my social media streams were flooded with Open-related content and my phone buzzed away with notifications from the Golf Monthly WhatsApp Open group, discussing which player was next up in the media centre, what stories to pursue and, even more distressingly, times and places to rendezvous for a pint of Guinness. To help reconcile my feelings of loss, I took up residence on my sofa from 6.30am on Thursday until 7pm on…

1 min.
letter of the month

Your wonderful article on Rosapenna in the August issue, and watching the final day at Portrush, have spurred me on to relate an experience my friends and I had when we played in the Donegal Links Classic 2019. We played Rosapenna, Ballyliffin and Portsalon in varying weather over the three days: horizontal wind and rain on Monday; sunburnt on Tuesday. A practice round at Dunfanaghy (where we stayed) on Sunday afternoon was played in 40mph winds. Stock Donegal weather! What amazed me when we checked in at Rosapenna on day one was the sheer size of the competition. We were team #49 of 125 teams of four who came from the USA, Canada and all over Europe, along with a healthy local contingent. The whole tournament was very well organised and one…

3 min.
your view

In praise of inconsistency While relishing the glorious Open victory of Shane Lowry, I thought about the wonderful inconsistency of golf. Whereas the same faces and teams invariably triumph in other sports, golf is delightfully unpredictable. Four Majors and four very different winners this year. A disastrous day followed by a valiant day for Rory Mcllroy, and good days followed by bad for JB Holmes. At club level, one day I am out-driven by a 45-handicapper, the next I beat my greatest rival. Most club players, at all skill levels, have at least one victory to their names, as well as those shameful last places. Just as with the weather, fortune and life, inconsistency in golf is its greatest attraction. I embrace it. Jakki Moxon, via email No phones, please Your correspondent, Fergus Bisset, suggests…

1 min.
our view

Where next for the Ryder Cup? Late July brought the news that the 2026 Ryder Cup will be contested at Adare Manor, the ultra-high-end County Limerick resort owned by JP McManus. To those in the industry, this came as little surprise as rumours had been rife for some time, although The Belfry had also been keen to get the event back. So, what about 2030? Purists, thrilled with the return of the Irish Open to the seaside, would love to see it visit a traditional links but that is now all but impossible. A modern links? Trump International in Aberdeen could be an option once its owner is no longer POTUS. Which of these countries would host the best Ryder Cup? On the continent, Germany, Sweden and Portugal probably have the strongest cases, but only…

2 min.
royal portrush

The weather may not have always obliged but you’d be hard-pushed to find a bad word from anyone about The Open’s return to the County Antrim links after 68 years. Indeed, there is already speculation that its unprecedented success could herald a return sooner than the typical eight- or nine-year rotation for venues other than St Andrews. Few would be disappointed if that were the case. BY THE NUMBERS 7 Shane Lowry is the seventh man in the last 100 years to win The Open by six or more 4 Brooks Koepka become just the fourth player to finish in the top four in all four Majors in a season T6 Robert MacIntyre’s finish makes him the first Scot to finish top ten on his Open debut since 1879 237,750 Royal Portrush had the second…

1 min.
how to play... a dogleg par 4

1 If water is in play and the only way to take it out of play is by laying up so short you can’t reach the green, think about the Rules. If you find the pond, you’ll quite possibly be playing your third from beside it rather than behind it, so you’ll still have a good chance of bogey. This should free you up a little on the tee. 2 You may be tempted to try and draw the ball away from the water, but if you’re a natural fader, I’d advise against that. Stick with the shape you’re comfortable with, go through your normal routine and back yourself. If a draw doesn’t come naturally, you may end up in the left-hand trees – not a great spot either! 3 Check how…