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Joy the Baker

Joy the Baker

Joy the Baker
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For the past twelve years on JoyTheBaker.com, I’ve created recipes that are classic and approachable with a little twist that usually involves bacon or browned butter. I want my recipes to be an irresistible invitation and a pep talk, because baking can be intimidating at first, but once you work through the basics, there will be endless delicious things coming out of your oven. In 2017, I launched The Bakehouse, a baking school, out of my home studio in New Orleans. I gather a dozen students at a time around my large marble island and teach pie baking, biscuit making, and cake decorating. It’s the most rewarding way I’ve found to take my work offline and to make new friends. Now you, too, can experience The Bakehouse warmth and camaraderie, just as my students do! I couldn’t be more excited about this premiere issue of Joy the Baker. Friends, it’s going to be a delicious holiday!

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Land:
United States
Taal:
English
Uitgever:
Heinrich Bauer Publishing, L. P.
Frequentie:
One-off
EDITIE KOPEN
€ 11,26(Incl. btw)

in deze editie

1 min.
welcome!

I’m Joy Wilson, but since 2008 I’ve been known on the internet as Joy the Baker. As the nickname implies, baking is my love language. I’m a self-taught-turned-professional baker, which means that my life is basically run by my unrelenting sweet tooth. For the past twelve years on JoyTheBaker.com, I’ve created recipes that are classic and approachable with a little twist that usually involves bacon or browned butter. I want my recipes to be an irresistible invitation and a pep talk, because baking can be intimidating at first, but once you work through the basics, there will be endless delicious things coming out of your oven. In 2017 I launched The Bakehouse, a baking school, out of my home studio in New Orleans. I gather a dozen students at a time…

2 min.
what i learned in new orleans

WHEN PEOPLE ASK ME WHY I MOVED FROM LOS ANGELES TO NEW ORLEANS, I RESPOND WITH A QUESTION: Have you ever been to New Orleans? If you have, then I feel like you can answer your own question. There’s a spirit here unique to itself. It’s celebratory, raw, and emotive. Here, all the joys and sorrows of life are celebrated all the same. I moved to New Orleans in early January 2014 because the city called me to her. After several visits over a handful of years, New Orleans felt like the place I needed to be. Such is the way of a magical city: She’ll call to you until you heed. I also moved to New Orleans in an elaborate attempt to end a romantic relationship without having an actual…

1 min.
about the bakehouse

SINCE 2017 I HAVE GATHERED AMATEUR BAKERS FROM ACROSS THE COUNTRY AT MY HOME STUDIO THAT I CALL THE BAKEHOUSE. The space is my baking dreams come to life: It has a huge open kitchen, a generous marble island, and a dining table large enough for a small army of people. I teach near weekly baking classes at The Bakehouse, making new friends in the name of biscuits and pie. The Bakehouse is a shotgun home built in the early 1900s in the historic New Orleans Bywater neighborhood. The Bywater area is known for its traditional architecture, lush greenery, and characters as colorful as the brightly painted shotgun homes. You’ll find the city’s sweetest restaurants, art galleries, curio shops, and community gardens within walking distance. It’s been a really special place…

2 min.
love from new orleans

IT HAS TAKEN ME A LONG TIME TO FIND THE WORDS TO WRITE ABOUT NEW ORLEANS FOOD. It takes years of living in a place, pinpointing the nuance of its food, and watching people cook in their homes to even start to understand a food culture. New Orleans is particularly complex because of its influences from African, French, Native American, Spanish, Italian, and Vietnamese cultures. To call it a melting pot feels trite and deeply accurate at the same time. I grew up in California, where our food culture comes from wherever our grandparents were born. Many of my favorite family dishes have roots in the Deep South, the place my grandmother left for California many decades ago. Her way with pound cakes and salty greens was unmatched. I find echoes…

1 min.
pantry staples

▶ CAMELLIA RED BEANS You might call them kidney beans if you don’t live down South, but here we call them red beans. We keep red beans in the pantry all year to make Red Beans & Rice (my recipe is on page 11). Camellia is my favorite brand. They cook up soft and break down to absolutely creamy. ▶ FILÉ POWDER Filé power is ground sassafras leaves (yes, the same plant that makes root beer). Traditionally filé powder was used to thicken gumbo, but in our gumbo, we’ll use it to add extra herb flavor. ▶ LOUISIANA POPCORN RICE Since moving to New Orleans, my instinct is to eat buttery rice with just about every meal. It’s the most delicious way I know to stretch a dish from dinner into tomorrow’s lunch. Cajun Country…

2 min.
chicken & andouille gumbo

SERVES 12 1¼ cups plus 2 tablespoons canola oil1 chicken (3½-4 pounds), cut into 8 pieces2½ teaspoons freshly ground black pepperKosher salt, to taste2 cups all-purpose flour1½ teaspoons chili powder1½ teaspoon filé powder½ teaspoon cayenne pepper½ teaspoon ground white pepper1 teaspoon paprika3 cloves garlic, minced3 stalks celery, minced1 green bell pepper, minced1 poblano pepper, minced1 yellow onion, minced12 cups chicken stock1 pound andouille sausage, halved and sliced12 ounces okra, trimmed and sliced ½ inch thickSliced scallions, for garnishCooked white rice or potato salad, for serving 1. Heat 1¼ cups oil in an 8-quart Dutch oven until a deep-fry thermometer reads 350°F. Season chicken with 1 teaspoon black pepper and salt to taste; toss with ½ cup flour. Working in batches, fry chicken until golden; transfer to paper towels to drain. 2. Add remaining…