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category_outlined / Nieuws & Politiek
The New YorkerThe New Yorker

The New Yorker July 8-15, 2019

Founded in 1925, The New Yorker publishes the best writers of its time and has received more National Magazine Awards than any other magazine, for its groundbreaking reporting, authoritative analysis, and creative inspiration. The New Yorker takes readers beyond the weekly print magazine with the web, mobile, tablet, social media, and signature events. The New Yorker is at once a classic and at the leading edge.

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United States
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47 Edities

IN DEZE EDITIE

access_time2 min.
contributors

Margaret Talbot (“Lonely Planet,” p. 48) has been a staff writer at The New Yorker since 2004. Daniel Alarcón (“Executive Decision,” p. 26) is the executive producer of NPR’s Spanish-language podcast, “Radio Ambulante,” and teaches at Columbia’s Journalism School. Andrea Cohen (Poem, p. 50) will publish her latest poetry collection, “Nightshade,” this fall. Charles McGrath (Books, p. 69) is a former deputy editor of The New Yorker and a former editor of the Times Book Review. Peter de Sève (Cover) is an illustrator and a character designer for animated movies. He has contributed more than forty covers to the magazine. Timothy Donnelly (Poem, p. 60) will publish a new poetry collection, “The Problem of the Many,” in October. He teaches in the Writing Program at Columbia. Adam Entous (“Father and Son,” p. 34) is a staff…

access_time3 min.
the mail

BRINGING UP BABY Lizzie Widdicombe, in her entertaining exploration of Emily Oster’s data-driven approach to raising children, cites several influences on the modern parent’s psyche, from Kourtney Kardashian to mommy bloggers and nosy friends (“Don’t Worry, Baby,” June 3rd). But, in her vivid portrayal of the frantic and sometimes futile efforts to find the right answers, Widdicombe does not give enough credit to perhaps the most reassuring figure of all: the pediatrician. Here’s a real expert, who has completed a medical degree and a residency in pediatrics and can properly interpret aggregated data after evaluating your child in person. In my wife’s and my experience, the most important step we took in preparing for our child’s birth was to choose a trustworthy pediatrician, who acts as an impartial, knowledgeable mediator when…

access_time28 min.
goings on about town: this week

During the summer months of the mid-twentieth century, the epicenter of the New York School shifted from the Cedar Tavern, in Greenwich Village, to the South Fork of Long Island. In the exhibition“Painters of the East End,” the Kasmin gallery focusses on eleven women from that community. (“Seed No. 10,” a 1969 gouache by Lee Krasner, is pictured here.) Some of the artists are well established (Helen Frankenthaler, Joan Mitchell); others deserve heightened attention (Betty Parsons, better known as a gallerist). Opens July 11. NIGHT LIFE Musicians and night-club proprietors lead complicated lives; it’s advisable to check in advance to confirm engagements. Dr. Lonnie Smith Jazz Standard Don’t question Dr. Lonnie Smith’s trademark turban or ask him to produce a diploma—just trust in this eminently funky organist’s ability to swing a room into submission. Splitting…

access_time3 min.
tables for two: da long yi hot pot

When, in around 280 A.D., the renowned Jin-dynasty writer Zuo Si took note of hot pot in his poem “Three Capitals Rhapsody,” he could scarcely have predicted that what was even then a culinary classic—in which diners cook raw ingredients in a boiling communal broth—would far outlive all three of the kingdoms to which he devoted his verses. Nor could he have imagined that Chengdu, one of the ancient capitals to which he paid homage, would become embroiled in a long-running feud with Chongqing, Sichuanese hot pot’s presumed birthplace, over which city truly embodies the soul of the region’s most distinctive cuisine. Now, in 2019, the rivalry has arrived in New York, where hot-pot franchises with varying allegiances battle for hearts and stomachs across the city’s boroughs. When Da Long Yi,…

access_time5 min.
comment: margin call

Watching the two Democratic debates last week, it was difficult to judge which of the twenty candidates was a truly marginal figure. Marianne Williamson, a writer specializing in soulfulness, might qualify, with her scorn for “superficial” plans, her promise to “harness love,” and her declaration that her first call as President would be to the Prime Minister of New Zealand. (“I would tell her, ‘Girlfriend, you are soon.’”) And yet, at the second debate, she stood out more than John Hickenlooper, the former governor of Colorado. Perhaps the marginal one was the entrepreneur Andrew Yang, who hardly had a chance to explain his offer of a thousand dollars a month to every adult American, or Representative Eric Swalwell, of California, who mainly seemed to be yelling about how former Vice-President…

access_time3 min.
drama dept.: mueller’s mouseketeers

The pictures we carry in our heads of Disney—cheerful rodents, regal lions, long waits for the good rides—rarely include Robert S. Mueller III. But last week a group of stars gathered at Riverside Church for a dramatization based on the special counsel’s report. The playwright Robert Schenkkan had distilled Mueller’s doorstop into “The Investigation: A Search for the Truth in Ten Acts,” with the actors reading verbatim the evidence for each alleged obstruction of justice. Financing for the endeavor came not from the Magic Kingdom—the Walt Disney Company—but from three Disney siblings who decided to collaborate on a project for the first time. “My mother, who was not a Disney, was a great storyteller, but I’m an idealist, and I think that’s the Disney side,” Abigail Disney said at the after-party,…

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