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Fashion
Vogue

Vogue Mar-14

Setting the standard for over 100 years has made Vogue the best selling fashion magazine in the world.

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Land:
United States
Taal:
English
Uitgever:
Conde Nast US
Verschijningsfrequentie:
Monthly
EDITIE KOPEN
€ 7,27(Incl. btw)
ABONNEREN
€ 18,19(Incl. btw)
12 Edities

in deze editie

1 min.
vogue.com

POP ART YouTube beauty queen Michelle Phan takes on the monumental task of re-creating Rihanna’s look. See the video, which details every step of Phan’s transformation on Vogue.com. CANDID CAMERA Photographer Phil Oh captures the best style from the streets of New York, London, Milan, and Paris. PLUS VOGUE’S VIEW Everyone sees what comes down the runway, but our photo portfolio catches all the unseen moments that make Fashion Week magic. FRONT-ROW FAVORITES Sometimes the audience’s style is just as important as what’s on the catwalk. With this in mind, we pick our favorite celebrities on the sidelines at the shows. BACKSTAGE BEAUTY Find out how to create the effortless look of flawless skin or the allure of a bold brow in our collections coverage. GUIDE → BEAUTY: POWER PRIMPING There’s light at the end of the winter tunnel—but it’s important to…

4 min.
powering up

Everywhere we looked during the spring 2014 collections, we saw Rihanna. Not the record-breaking, social-media-ruling pop icon herself, but rather her look, her attitude, was replicated on so many of the season’s runways. It started in New York with Alexander Wang, continued on to London with Tom Ford, switched over to Pucci in Milan, and then arrived in Paris at Balmain. During the shows, Vogue’s editors started to call this phenomenon the RiRi ripple, though “tidal wave” might have been more accurate. How, then, could we not make this 26-year-old Bajan global superstar our March cover girl, given that this is our annual Power Issue, where we celebrate those who decisively inform and influence our world? That Rihanna is such an inspiration to designers this spring speaks volumes about the compelling…

7 min.
letters from readers

THE ART OF THE MATTER The combination of Grace Coddington’s impeccable taste, Annie Leibovitz’s discerning eye, and Jessica Chastain’s striking looks makes “Work of Art” [by Tom Shone, December] a work of genius. The cover of Chastain as Frederic Leighton’s Flaming June is easily one of VOGUE’s best. Well done! Peter Stamelman New York, NY The images of Jessica Chastain were stunning. I commend your vision—the courage with which you march to the beat of your own drum. Thank you for reminding us that fashion is not only decorative and transient but that it’s also interwoven with many other disciplines and has been throughout history. Rosemary Muir Toronto, Ontario, Canada As an art historian, I was fascinated to see an interpretation of the enchanting Flaming June by Frederic Leighton on the cover of the December issue. Inside,…

3 min.
contributors

JOEL KINNAMAN As a polar vortex swept across much of the U.S. in early January, actor Joel Kinnaman was happy to be wearing just a T-shirt while speaking to Vogue from his backyard in Los Angeles. The Stockholm native, familiar to American audiences as shady homicide detective Stephen Holder on AMC’s The Killing, knows a thing or two about bad weather—most of his scenes in the Seattle-set crime drama were in the rain. Cloudiness of another kind often casts a shadow on Kinnaman’s roles, from his business student turned drug runner in 2010’s Easy Money (for which he won a Guldbagge, the Swedish equivalent of an Oscar) to a crime-fighting cyborg in José Padilha’s RoboCop reboot, in theaters on February 12. “I seem to gravitate toward characters who live in the…

10 min.
the lost girls

The snow was falling outside the eight windows of the shingled Cape house as I fed the baby, and even then the slow-blinking eyes of the girls came to me. I was walking on the shale rocks by a green summer sea and would see mothers gathered together on a porch in the African dusk waiting for the girls’ return. As credits rolled up on the screen after a movie, I would drift off in the dark and think of the girls in the shadow of a fig tree. I did not know these girls, but I knew their story. I had written about them a decade before, but they wouldn’t leave me. So one day I took my pen—a nib pen dipped in ink (old habit)—and spent the next seven years…

11 min.
shock to the system

Kirsten Gillibrand dates her battle with the U.S. military brass to late 2012. That was when the junior senator from New York attended a screening of The Invisible War, writer-director Kirby Dick’s documentary about sexual assault in the military. Like most Americans, Gillibrand was then only vaguely familiar with the problem—and the numbers came as a shock. According to a 2012 government report, an estimated 26,000 men and women in uniform had been subject to “unwanted sexual contact” from fellow service members over the previous twelve months. And yet only 3,374 such cases were reported, with 238 resulting in convictions. Of that number, 176 perpetrators actually served time. Put another way, the documentary reported, one in five women in the military is sexually assaulted or harassed over the course of…