Wine Enthusiast Magazine

Best of 2021

Wine Enthusiast Magazine is one of the most respected and quoted authorities in the world of wine and spirits. We feature the hottest trends in everything related to wine. Our seasoned editors do the work for you, with over 700 expert ratings and reviews in each issue. Plus, in-depth features on all aspects of cocktails, spirits, beer, inventive wine and food pairings, trendy recipes, savvy travel features, and more.

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United States
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Wine Enthusiast
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13 Edities

in deze editie

2 min
wine enthusiast

Jacqueline Strum EDITOR & PUBLISHER MANAGING EDITOR Lauren Buzzeo TASTING DIRECTOR Alexander Peartree CREATIVE DIRECTOR Marco Turelli DIGITAL CREATIVE DIRECTOR Julia Lea EDITORIAL ASSOCIATE MANAGING EDITOR Layla Schlack ASSISTANT EDITOR Jacy Topps TASTING ASSISTANT TASTING DIRECTOR Fiona Adams TASTING COORDINATOR Craig Chamberlain ASSISTANT TASTING COORDINATOR Cody Wexler DIGITAL ASSOCIATE MANAGING EDITOR Emily Saladino SENIOR DIGITAL EDITOR Dylan Garret DIGITAL EDITOR Kristen Richard ASSISTANT DIGITAL EDITOR J’nai Gaither DIGITAL EDITORIAL ASSISTANT Jaime Brown DESIGN ART DIRECTOR Monica Simon DIGITAL DESIGNER Eric DeFreitas VISUALS PRODUCER Jesse Reiter ASSOCIATE PHOTO PRODUCER Tom Arena SOCIAL SOCIAL MEDIA MANAGER Elyse Estrella SOCIAL MEDIA COORDINATOR Marco Bruno CONTRIBUTING EDITORS EUROPEAN EDITOR Roger Voss ITALIAN EDITOR Kerin O’Keefe WINE Virginie Boone, Mike DeSimone, Jim Gordon, Paul Gregutt, Anna Lee C. Iijima, Jeff Jenssen, Matt Kettmann, Christina Pickard, Michael Schachner, Sean P. Sullivan SPIRITS Kara Newman BEER John Holl FOOD Nils Bernstein TRAVEL Lauren Mowery SENIOR DIGITAL ADVERTISING DIRECTOR Greg Remillard SENIOR DIRECTOR OF OPERATIONS & EVENTS Jen Cortellini DIRECTOR OF…

3 min
in this issue: looking back to look ahead

As the year comes to a close, we revel in the paradox that was 2021. Moments of joy and celebration were bookended by fear and trepidation. We felt a return to comfort while welcoming the strange new world we find ourselves in today. It’s these diverging times that we see mirrored in our glass. Our final issue of the year dives deep into some of those enigmatic meetings in the vineyard and how they can make for an even more delicious future. In the outer reaches of Portugal’s Douro Superior, new varieties are taking root and taming the wild terroir to their benefit (page 114). In Sonoma, a region once defined by the “new,” takes a nod from the “old” ways in the French Monopole method of controlling every aspect of…

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1 min
out & about: sips and snaps around the globe

PINKNIC This rosé-themed festival returned to New York City’s Governor’s Island in September, for its fifth year. Over the course of Labor Day Weekend, the island was decked out in pink. Audiences were treated to DJs, live bands and a food garden catered by local restaurants. The rosé, frosé, bubbly and cocktails all flowed freely, and evenings culminated in pink fireworks displays. WESTCHESTER MAGAZINE’S WINE & FOOD FESTIVAL This event returned for its 10th year, over the course of five days in September. A variety of wine events around Westchester County, New York, gave attendees the opportunity to sample local restaurants, attend seminars about Italian wine, pair burgers and beer, or attend an exclusive collectors’ dinner. PINKNIC: AJR PHOTOS; WESTCHESTER: ED SHIN AND TIFFANY MASCOTTI…

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2 min
winemag.com: how do you make wine for the ages?

“It’s like the holy grail, to make wines that age, that you can enjoy 20, 30 or 40 years later,” says Rick Small, who founded Woodward Canyon Winery with his wife Darcey in Lowden, Washington, in 1981. Since then, the pair have created some of Washington State’s most ageworthy wines, with their children Jordan Dunn-Small and Sager Small recently taking the helm. Many winemakers strive to create wines that stand the test of time. It’s a difficult endeavor that requires certain conditions in the vineyard and winery, some of which are beyond winemakers’ immediate control. “The wine has to have the right amount of fruit, it has to have the right amount of acidity, and it has to have the right amount of tannin,” says Small. “That’s going to all want to…

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4 min
italy’s volcanic sparkler erupts

A LITTLE SPARKLE As 2021 draws to a close, we’re celebrating with the very finest. In this issue, you’ll find our Wine Star Award winners and our Best of Year bottles. When it comes to bubbly, Italy’s metodo classicos are right up there. Turn the page to learn more.>> ON THE WILD SIDE Lessini Durello’s growing zone lies on the border between the Verona and Vicenza provinces in the Veneto region. Overlapping part of the Soave denomination, the wine is named after the Lessini mountain range. Durella, a rare, native grape, thrives in the range’s steep, wild eastern hills. The high-altitude, well-ventilated vineyards benefit from full southern exposures, while sharp day-night temperature changes generate complexity. Composed of basalt rock and tuffs containing iron and magnesium, the area’s volcanic soils lend noticeable minerality to the…

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2 min
grape on the go: grüner goes global

Pops of white peppercorn, a squirt of a juicy peach and a racy line of minerality—these are the characteristics that bring fans of Austrian Grüner Veltliner to the table. A natural crossing of Traminer and an unknown grape, it’s considered indigenous to Austria and is the country’s most widely planted grape today. There, the best examples are grown at higher altitude in rocky soils on steep slopes, with extreme temperature shifts to retain acidity yet ripen the fruit. “Grüner is definitely much more terroir-sensitive than Chardonnay, Sauvignon Blanc or Riesling,” says Bertold Salomon, owner of Salomon Undhof in Austria. Simply put, it’s not a grape that can be grown just anywhere. However, it’s thriving in these three regions. ALTO ADIGE, ITALY Grüner was introduced to this northern Italian wine region in the 1990s,…

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