EXPLOREMY LIBRARY
Crafts
Bead&Button

Bead&Button December 2015

As the complete beading resource, Bead & Button features innovative and unique projects by top jewelry designers that challenge and inspire readers of all skill levels to learn, grow and excel in their beading. Every project is fully tested for clarity and dependability so that readers can master the skills needed to create beautiful jewelry pieces.

Country:
United States
Language:
English
Publisher:
Kalmbach Publishing Co. - Magazines
Frequency:
Bimonthly
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in this issue

1 min.
holiday cheer

With the winter holidays comes a bonus — an extra reason to wear sparkling beadwork! This issue offers several holiday styles to make, like Janice Chatham’s cover necklace (p. 26), Cara Landry’s jewel-toned bracelets (p. 30), Gianna Zimmerman’s floral necklace (p. 40), Jeanette Dailey Bobby’s garland-inspired bracelet (p. 60), and Lane Landry’s peppermint delights (p. 68). For year-round style, try the crystal bracelets by Jackie Schweitz (p. 23), Nicole Vogt (p. 36), Maria Theresa Moran (p. 48) and Cary Bruner (p. 64), as well as Renee Kovnesky’s simply elegant necklace (p. 72). As always, we have hidden a bead strand somewhere in this issue — it looks exactly like the one at right. When you find it, email its location to me by January 8 at editor@beadandbutton.com (put “Find the Bead…

2 min.
bead happenings

BeadDreams 2016 Once again, we are accepting submissions for BeadDreams, our annual juried competition celebrating creativity and artistry in beading. Finalists will be displayed at the Bead&Button Show in June and will complete for prizes totaling more than $10,000! Submissions are due February 26, 2016. Go to www.BeadAndButton.com/BeadDreams for complete rules. Shown at left: “Moby” by Huib Petersen, BeadDreams 2015. National Button Day Mark your calendars and get out your buttons — November 16 is National Button Day! Send us photos of your favorite button designs so we can share them with the beading community on the big day! Email your photos to editor@beadandbutton.com, and put “Button design” in the subject line. Gone too soon Justyna Szlezak, whom many beaders were introduced to through her “Blooming flower pendant” (June, 2015) passed away on August 9…

2 min.
holiday wish list

Julia I love art glass and am smitten with Amanda Muddimer’s “Harlequin” pendants. Available at www.mangobeads.co.uk. The book 18 Beaded Jewelry Projects offers the perfect blend of instruction and inspiration for a little motherdaughter beading time this coming year. Available at www.JewelryandBeadingStore.com. Czech glass buttons always make my list — they’re cool and colorful and make great clasps, pendants, or components. This one is available at www.artbeads.com. There is nothing quite like making a great piece of jewelry from a beading kit! I’m drooling over this beautiful “Peledu” necklace kit by Isabella Lam, www.bead4me.etsy.com. Anna Chernykh’s metal jewelry findings are beautiful and inventive and can really elevate a design, so they make my list this year. Get them at www.annabronze.com. Cassie Make your own cool business cards at www.moo.com — just upload as many images you desire…

2 min.
design challenge

Cassie Using Heather’s bird and tree beads as the focal, I slightly warmed up the mood by making a tubular herringbone necklace in golden colors and adding warm brown hues with pip beads. Although not visible from the front, the donut-shaped polymer beads sit comfortably inside the flared ends (Design challenge ideas are for your inspiration; instructions are not available.) Connie I love the colors of the polymer beads for this challenge. Using seed and fire-polished beads in greens and browns, I made components with the donut beads, and joined them into a chain. A charm from www.stinkydogbeads.com finished the bird-and-tree pendant. Lorelei Eurto (B&B reader) The cool blue, green, and grey hues set the tone of my design. I’m always fond of an asymmetrical design, and the focal beads along with clusters of the donut beads…

2 min.
your work

Against All Odds An exuberant arrangement of peyote blossoms and bezeled stones, this bracelet features fuchsia and teal accents among cream flowers and olive cabochons. I call the piece “Against All Odds” because for me it represents nature prevailing and thriving in the most unlikely and unwelcoming environments. Blue Duchess Nearly every picture of Sarah Churchill, Duchess of Marlborough (1660–1744), depicts her with a bare neck. Engaging in a bit of fantasy, I created this stunning neckpiece just for her. Working in bead embroidery, I included more than 90 crystal stones and beads, Czech and Japanese seed beads, and agate and mother-of pearl beads. The necklace measures about 17 in. (43 cm) long and fits nicely around the neck — perfect for a Duchess! Musing Monk I created this 10½ x 35½ in. (26.7 x…

2 min.
variations on a theme

The original In college I had a teacher who demanded a minimum of 20 sketches in response to her design challenges. Pushing myself to come up with that many ideas forced me to travel far from what I knew, and in so doing, make experimental play part of the creative journey. When I first saw Robin Tennebaum’s “Jasper Coin Necklace” (above, left), I thought “I can’t use this, there’s no glaring design issue to improve upon.” So I filed it away. Then I remembered my college design professor’s challenges. For the final 2015 Second Look column, I wanted to see where I could take an already solid composition. Not necessarily to improve it, but to simply play, to experiment and learn. So I retrieved Robin’s design and took a second look. Several aspects of…