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Bloomberg Businessweek

Bloomberg Businessweek 9/18/2017

Each issue of Businessweek features in-depth perspectives on the financial markets, industries, trends, technology and people guiding the economy. Get the digital magazine subscription today and draw upon Businessweek's timely incisive analysis to help you make better decisions about your career, your business, and your personal investments.

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Country:
United States
Language:
English
Publisher:
Bloomberg Finance LP
Frequency:
Weekly
$7.99
$59.99
50 Issues

in this issue

4 min
your next phone will probably cost $1,000

“A thousand dollars is a line in the sand” When U.S. wireless carriers started winding down their heavy smartphone subsidies a few years back, many Americans kicked the new-model-every-two-years habit that had become routine early in the iPhone era. Those who didn’t had to accept prices ticking slowly higher as Apple Inc. and Samsung Electronics Co. try to outdo one another with cooler features. But both companies have been loath to cross one price barrier in particular—until now. On Sept. 12, Apple introduced the iPhone X (as in “ten”), which will cost $999 for the model with 64 gigabytes of storage; the 256GB model will run $1,149 when the phones go on sale in early November. A few days after the iPhone unveiling, Samsung’s Note 8 goes on sale for a comparable…

11 min
thank you for calling equifax, your business is not important to us

You shouldn’t need to do a damn thing to keep your credit information safe. We’re all accustomed to the busywork of managing personal finances. You check your 401(k) retirement account, making sure your portfolio is carefully balanced. You scan your bank and credit card statements from time to time to verify the charges. These are things responsible people do. But there’s a good chance you’ve spent time recently on a chore you didn’t sign up for: finding out if hackers possibly stole information about you from Equifax Inc., one of the three big consumer-credit reporting companies in the U.S. On Sept. 7 it announced a data breach that may have put about 143 million people in the U.S.at risk, exposing names, addresses, birth dates, and Social Security numbers, details that could help…

4 min
where county lines mean life and death

In southwest Ohio, people die from drug overdoses at more than double the national rate. In the future, whether people survive could hinge on the county they’re in. The sheriff in Butler County this summer declared that his officers wouldn’t carry medication to reverse overdoses. In Middletown, a city of 49,000 that straddles the county line, Dan Picard, a council member frustrated by the costs of battling the opioid epidemic, went further, suggesting ambulance crews shouldn’t have to save the lives of some people who have already been revived before. Next door in Hamilton County, which includes Cincinnati, officials are taking the opposite tack. They aim to create the Narcan capital of America: Police, firefighters, and medics carry the opioid-overdose-reversal nasal spray. Over the next few years, Hamilton plans to distribute more…

3 min
the complete package

Porsche Cayenne GTS The $97,200 Cayenne GTS is a slick blend of luxury, off-road handling, and smooth performance. The $60,600 base Cayenne has a 300-horsepower V-6 engine and all-wheel drive, but the GTS I tested gets to 440 hp. It goes from zero-60 miles per hour in 4.9 seconds—impressive. Drivers who like power will admire its assertive grip around curves and fearless acceleration. Aesthetes will love its singular exterior beauty. Inside, the generous space is leather-lined, and the intuitive infotainment system, rain-sensing wipers, and power-lift tailgate all come standard. The excellent park assist with front and rear cameras is a good investment. The trunk offers more than 60 cubic feet of space with the seats laid flat. The Cayenne is almost a sports car, which means you’ll have a family vehicle that’s actually…

6 min
as populists upend politics worldwide, german voters stick with what's working

To reach gluemaker Delo Industrie Klebstoffe GmbH, you drive an hour from Munich, past villages with onion-domed churches and the cobalt-blue waters of the Ammersee with its views of the Alps, before turning into offices nestled between a cornfield and a grove of beech trees—hardly the kind of place you’d expect to find a global leader in its industry. Yet one of Delo’s adhesives is used in 80 percent of the world’s smart cards, and its customers are spread across Europe, the U.S., and Asia. That success is testament to Germany’s commitment to globalism—now a dirty word in some countries—and helps explain a political puzzle: How, in 2017, can Europe’s biggest economy have a normal, even boring, election while crusading populists have upended the political order elsewhere? “Other countries haven’t had…

2 min
jagdeep bachher

JAGDEEP BACHHER STANDS out among chief investment officers. First there’s the head-wear. Bachher is a practicing Sikh, and the turban he wears, whether orange, red, or baby blue, is always perfectly paired with his business attire, matching his tie, even his socks. Second is his obsession with management fees. While institutional investors have gotten more particular about costs in recent years as high-priced hedge funds have struggled to deliver returns above market indexes, Bachher has taken it to the extreme. Since being hired to lead the University of California Regents’ $110 billion pension and endowment in 2014, he’s fired almost half of the outside money managers formerly on his payroll as he’s sought to cut fat and concentrate market bets. “I truly believe that less is more,” Bachher says. “Let’s do a few…