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Boating NZBoating NZ

Boating NZ April 2018

Boating NZ inspires boating enthusiasts with reviews of new boats, coverage of technical innovations, maintenance advice, columns and cruising stories.

Country:
New Zealand
Language:
English
Publisher:
Boating New Zealand Limited
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12 Issues

IN THIS ISSUE

2 min.
what a blast

They’ve been and gone – and are now racing south to the high latitudes before turning east for Cape Horn. If the Southern Ocean lives up to its reputation, they’re definitely in for a blast. I am, of course, talking about the Volvo Ocean Race boats, but the ‘blast’ I’m referring to is their two-week stop-over in Auckland. Fun, colourful, wild. A fantastic, cosmopolitan flavour. Amazing vibe. A rare, privileged insight into the lives of a group of mad men/women – and their incredibly high-tech machines. These are just some of the comments I’ve recorded from visitors to the Race Village – sailors, power-boaters and landlubbers alike. Auckland celebrated the event in style, even cooperating with mostly superb weather – and it drew the crowds. VOR representatives estimate more than 500,000 visitors descended on…

12 min.
boat world news

MRS FRISBEE GOES HOME An emaciated Atlantic grey seal which nearly choked to death with a frisbee stuck around her neck has been released back into the wild after a five-month recovery programme. The seal was ‘nearly dead’ with deep cut wounds when she was found last year at Horsey beach in Norfolk in the UK. Staff at the RSPCA’s East Winch wildlife centre – where staff nicknamed her Mrs Frisbee – had to cut away the plastic toy which had cut deep into the seal’s neck. They believe Mrs Frisbee could have been struggling with the plastic ring throttling her for up to six months. But she has since made a full recovery, having ballooned from 67kg on admission to 180kg on the day she was released. Centre Manager Alison Charles says the seal…

2 min.
letters to the editor

POPULAR NAME Even though we are real sailing enthusiasts we enjoyed your article about the game fishing boat Yeah Buoy (March 2018). What a coincidence: we are also a German-born couple and our 27ft Catalina is also called Yeah Buoy! It has been a very original idea by our son following up on our previous trailer sailer Bloo Buoy. Our tender is called Baby Buoy. So we thought we had the game on words sussed, but it looks as if we found some (German) competition! However, we have pipped them in the race for official recognition since our boat is registered with Yachting New Zealand under its iconic name (Reg# 9533). Happy boating/sailing! Martin Esser, Whangarei ANYONE KNOW SYLVIE? Do any of your readers have information on a yacht currently called Sylvie? She’s 25-feet long,…

8 min.
simply magic

This is the situation in which I found myself, checking out Riviera’s new 4800 Sport Yacht. After all, if you’re on a boat designed for super-comfortable cruising, it’s only natural that a responsible writer should thoroughly investigate its potential for relaxation and socialising. Riviera is a well-known name to New Zealand boaties, and the 4800 offers just what you’d expect from this Australian brand. She’s the second of her kind in New Zealand and is the kind of boat in which you want to arrive at a bay, with curvaceous, modern lines that are definitely going to turn heads. And its twin 600hp Volvo diesels gets to your destination quick-smart too. There’s no sign of the perennial bad weather on the day we head out of Westhaven, and flat water and bright…

4 min.
into the cauldron

I was lucky enough – during the fleet’s two-week stop-over – to sail on one of the Volvo 65 boats and speak to crew members from various teams. Let me say at the outset I think they’re insane, every last one of them – but they did offer intriguing insights into the VOR experience. Here are a few of my impressions: Multi-national and polyglot – with the 68 crew members on the seven vessels representing nationalities from all parts of the globe, the VOR is truly an ‘international’ event. I was a guest aboard China’s Dongfeng Racing Team in one of the Pro-Am races on Waitemata harbour. Thanks largely to my heroic grinding on the jib-trimming winch, we came second. I have a medal to prove it! I was also knackered… But the…

2 min.
it’s still wide open

At 45,000 miles, this 2017-18 VOR is the longest in the 45-year history of the event. Auckland – the end of Leg 6 from Hong Kong – was the halfway mark. Plenty of racing remains, and anyone could win. Only five points separate Mapfre – the Spanish team leading the race – and Dongfeng Racing Team, the Chinese boat in second place (39 to 34 points). In third place is Team Sun Hung/Scallywag from Hong Kong (26), Team AkzoNobel, Dutch, and USA/Denmark’s Vestas 11 Hour Racing (both on 23), followed by the Dutch Team Brunel (20), with the United Nations’ Turn the Tide on Plastic bringing up the rear on 12 points. While you might think this effectively equates to a two-horse race, think again. To appreciate how close the race is, you need…