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Boating NZBoating NZ

Boating NZ February 2017

Boating NZ inspires boating enthusiasts with reviews of new boats, coverage of technical innovations, maintenance advice, columns and cruising stories.

Country:
New Zealand
Language:
English
Publisher:
Boating New Zealand Limited
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12 Issues

IN THIS ISSUE

1 min.
crafting a dream

As thousands of New Zealanders will attest, there’s something inherently invigorating about building a boat. The process of creating a functional, living artefact is particularly satisfying when – after months of slog – she finally slides and settles into the water for the first time. A product of your own, blistered hands, complete in her gleaming paint. Boatbuilding projects, of course, aren’t accessible to all. Not everyone has the space or inclination to tackle a job which might run over many years, and invariably streamline the bank balance for the privilege. Fewer still are natural DIYers – and even when they are, they may lack the courage to construct something in which they – and their families – might risk their lives. Hammering a planter box into shape is one thing – committing…

8 min.
onwatch

O’pen Bics at Wanaka regatta THIRTY-SIX JUNIOR sailors participated in an inaugural race during Lake Wanaka’s annual New Year Regatta – competing in a new fleet of O’Pen Bic boats. Lake Wanaka Yacht Club coach Barry McKay says the O’Pen Bic is a new, skiff-like design which is very fast and can’t sink. The fleet has been acquired over the last six months – part of a strategy to ‘reinvigorate youth sailing’ and make it more fun. The sailors also received a little tactical guidance from New Zealand racing legend Sir Russell Coutts during the event. Wanaka’s Nichola Sanders (17) emerged as the winner, followed by Dunedin’s Oli Gilmore (16), with Auckland’s Mattias Coutts (11) third. Mattias (pictured) seems to be following in his famous father’s footsteps. The Yacht Club has also awarded four sailors…

2 min.
boating quiz

1. What is the approximate top speed of the Southern Bluefin Tuna? a. 56 km/h b. 66 km/h c. 76 km/h d. 86 km/h 2. What is the function of an electrical relay? 3. What letter does this flag represent? 4. If the above flag is flown from the start boat, what does it mean? 5. What should you do in the event of a “Man overboard”? a. Shout ‘man overboard’ to alert the crew. b. Press the MOB button on the GPS. c. Throw a life buoy and dan-buoy to the MOB. d. Allocate a crewmember to point at the MOB in the water. e. All of the above. 6. True or false? A boat will float higher in fresh water. 7. What should you do if you think you may have caught a submarine…

5 min.
letters to the editor

Address to: The Editor, Boating New Zealand, PO Box 6341, Wellesley Street, Auckland 1141, or email editor@boatingnz.co.nz Mistaken Memories RE: YOUR STORY about the Sunderland and the Lady Jocelyn in the January 2017 issue. Sadly I believe your writer – Lindsay Wright – has been misinformed. It sounds like the crew of Lady Jocelyn had more than a few beers. Sunderlands did not take off from Mechanic’s Bay at night. Sunderlands never took off at night without a flare path. Sunderlands did not lay flare paths. The flare path was laid by the control launch. The control launch always swept the path for debris and after making sure the area was clear of shipping gave clearance for take-off. Night flying of Sunderlands was carried out the other side of Browns Island approximately opposite the…

6 min.
steroids for the family

“Ride as fast you dare, or as fast as your better half allows” Heading out for a family beach picnic – on a PWC? Absolutely. And nothing illustrates the viability of the concept more effectively than Yamaha’s new GP1800. The flagship of the marque’s 2017 WaveRunner range, this three-seater will whisk a trio to a remote beach as fast as the driver dares to go – carving wakes and jumping waves in spray-flung excitement. Yes, there’s plenty of storage space for carrying the picnic goodies – a massive 93-litre storage locker in the bow, a removable watertight bucket under the seat and a glove box with twin drink holders. More than adequate for stowing a hearty lunch. And in case you think 1800ccs of supercharged grunt is waaaaaay too powerful for a decent, law-abiding…

5 min.
pumped for sailing

Henshaw, who represented New Zealand in the 470 at the Sydney Olympics in 2000, was on holiday in the south of France with her family when they spotted someone sailing an eye-catching yellow inflatable boat. Her father negotiated the use of one, and she gave it a try — and loved the experience so much she negotiated to become the Tiwal agent for New Zealand and Australia. The bright-yellow-and-grey Tiwal is the invention of French sailor and industrial designer Marion Excoffon, who wanted to create an easily transportable dinghy which could be sailed single- or double-handed, and would not only be fun but also offer a decent level of performance. Other inflatable sailing dinghies in the market, such as the Dutch DinghyGo, look more like tenders with sails, while the Tiwal…