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Boating NZBoating NZ

Boating NZ October 2017

Boating NZ inspires boating enthusiasts with reviews of new boats, coverage of technical innovations, maintenance advice, columns and cruising stories.

Country:
New Zealand
Language:
English
Publisher:
Boating New Zealand Limited
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12 Issues

IN THIS ISSUE

2 min.
can the caribbean survive?

This issue leaves in a few hours for the printers, and as I write yet another mammoth hurricane (Maria) is bearing down on the Caribbean, destined to unleash her misery over the next few days. As anyone who’s kept even half an eye open over the last two weeks will realise, many of the islands in the region have been all but obliterated – this new storm will only retard the recovery efforts. The destruction of Tortola, St Maarten and St Barts resonated deeply with my wife and I – we spent much of our early twenties working in the islands. Me as a mechanic on a fleet of charter yachts, she a glamorous, bikini-clad hostess/deckhand on a large sailing cat carrying day-trippers. They were fun, care-free, spirited times – memories that are…

1 min.
the faces of climate change

The threat of rising sea levels is being graphically represented in a series of ‘disappearing’ portraits painted by Hawaiian surfer-turned-artist Sean Yoro, who uses tidal movements to reinforce his message. Typically painted on sea walls and similar structures in various parts of the world, the portraits are only entirely visible twice a day – at low tide. The objective, says Yoro, is to “ignite a sense of urgency towards climate change in those who stumble upon these murals.” His portraits usually take anything from a day to three or four days to complete, depending on size and detail. He uses traditional oil paint, even though it doesn’t last as long as acrylic paint. But he prefers oil because its transience underscores the point about climate change: “life is precarious.” The paint is custom-designed…

1 min.
whatever happened to the giant?

The Seawise Giant seemed destined for an unhappy life from the moment she was launched in 1979 by Sumitomo Heavy Industries. The Greek company that ordered her reneged on the deal, and that set the tone. She endured numerous ownership and name changes over her 30 years’ service. But the ultimate indignity came when she was sunk by Saddam Hussain’s missiles during the Iran-Iraq war of 1988. She was declared a write-off but fortunately sank in shallow water, allowing salvagers to re-float her. Refurbished, she continued transporting oil for 21 more years between the Middle East and the USA. Twice the size of the Titanic, the Seawise Giant was so vast she couldn’t navigate the English Channel and took five miles to slow to a halt from her full speed of 16.5…

1 min.
news bites

FUN RALLY FOR CRUISERS The New Zealand Multihull Yacht Club has teamed up with 36° Brokers and PIC Insurance Brokers to offer an alternative Coastal Classic for those wanting a more relaxed journey north. The all-new Cruising Rally is aimed at production boats and cruisers keen to take part in the race but avoid the hectic start line and necessity of a handicap. “Starting an hour earlier than the race fleet will mean the cruising boats get away in a nice clear start and can enjoy the sight of the big boats racing past,” says race spokesperson Greer Houston, commodore of the NZMYC. “Once in Russell they can enjoy the fun and festivities, take part in the party, and utilise the water taxis.” “We want to create opportunities for people to really enjoy…

2 min.
a cook joins the plastic fight

watch the race VISIT www.volvooceanrace.com Bianca Cook – eldest daughter of Yachting Developments’ founders Ian and Blanche Cook – has been selected as the 10th crewmember on board Clean Seas – Turn the Tide on Plastic, racing in the Volvo Ocean Race later this year. Bianca (28), joins skipper Dee Caffari’s mixed and youth-focused campaign after successful trials, just 44 days ahead of the start of the race. Bianca has significant experience offshore, accumulating over 70,000 offshore miles in the last few years, most recently as second mate on board the superyacht Hetairos. For Bianca, this is a lifetime opportunity to put her sailing skills to the test in one of the toughest and most respected sailing races in the world. “I’ve grown up watching the Volvo Ocean Race teams and I can’t believe…

1 min.
easter island’s marine park

The marine ecosystem is home to 142 species found nowhere else Chile’s Easter Island is famous for its Moai ‘head’ statues, but is bound to become even more renowned following the recent establishment of one of the world’s largest marine protection areas (MPA) off its coast. The new 740,000km2 Rapa Nui MPA is 4,000km from the Chile mainland, and is about the same size as the country itself. The area’s unique marine ecosystem is home to 142 species found nowhere else, 27 of which are threatened or endangered. It is also a spawning and breeding ground for many ocean predators, including tuna, marlin, swordfish and sharks. The designation protects these thriving marine ecosystems from industrial commercial fishing, mining, and other large-scale extractive activities within Easter Island’s waters but allows the artisanal fishing practices…