Climbing December 2017 - January 2018

Climbing offers the entire climbing world: sport, trad, bouldering, walls, ice, alpine and mountains. In each issue we offer the richest stories on the vertical world you'll ever read, with award-winning photography. Climbing has earned its moniker as the journal of record for climbers worldwide.

País:
United States
Língua:
English
Editora:
Pocket Outdoor Media, LLC
Periodicidade:
One-off
US$ 5,99

nesta edição

3 minutos
flash

CLIMBERS Jim Reynolds and Brad Gobright ROUTE the Nose (VI 5.8 C2) FIRST ASCENT Warren Harding, Wayne Merry, George Whitmore LOCATION El Capitan, Yosemite National Park, California At 6:50 a.m. on October 21, 2017, Jim Reynolds hit the stopwatch as he and Brad Gobright surged up the Nose of El Capitan, with 8 cams from .3 to 2 inches, 11 draws, and 14 carabiners. Gobright, a 29-year-old pro climber from Orange County, CA, and Reynolds, a 24-year-old Trinity County, CA, native and YOSAR member, were on the climb for the eleventh time this autumn, vying for the speed record. They topped out in 2:19:44, setting the record and beating Alex Honnold and Hans Florine’s June 22, 2012, time of 2:23:46. “The last three pitches were super exciting,” says Gobright of their sprint to the summit. (This photo shows…

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3 minutos
train… in vain?

I LEARNED TO CLIMB in the era before rock gyms. Back then, if you wanted to get better, you climbed. In Albuquerque, New Mexico, where I grew up, you got stronger either by toproping or by bouldering on the basalt bluffs of the West Mesa and the sharp granite boulders of the Sandia foothills. When the weather was bad, you lifted weights. Then, in 1988, the Albuquerque Rock Gym opened; around this time, hangboards were first mass-produced. I mounted the original Metolius Simulator in my garage, attached the bungee cords, and started cranking. On cold winter nights, I’d make my father hold the stopwatch for me until he’d had enough and went back inside. I got stronger. Back then, we lived in the dark ages of training. Free climbing in America had…

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2 minutos
unsolicited beta

FREERIDER I was amused by “The Freerider” (climbing.com/freeridersolo) about Alex Honnold’s unroped ascent of El Capitan. James Lucas’s take is artfully playful. He wins at picking fun at Alex yet honors his feat in a way that could only be written by someone who knows the guy. And who can resist the quotes from Alex’s mom! —David Rozul, via email VERTICAL THERAPY In regards to Katie Lambert’s “Head, Fingers, Knees, and Toes” (climbing.com/mentalhealth), I have struggled with depression and anxiety, and found climbing to be a trigger. It was only through cognitive behavioral therapy that I realized failing on a move or to reach a certain grade was triggering negative core beliefs. Climbing is much easier and funner now, but it took some professional help to get me there. —Anneh Fletcher, via Climbing.com OVERCOMING PTSD I read…

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1 minutos
training tricks

Squeezing in pinch-training and shoulder-press exercises at work. —FAVIA DUBYK This is me on an FA at The Crash Pad climber hostel in Chattanooga, Tennessee. —BRENDAN BAARS Heel hooking around the Bridge Traverse at our gîte as part of our post-climb cool-down in Font. —SAM MILNER Finger-strength training à la A-Clamps. —CHLOE FITZMAURICE I know a perfect splitter when I see one. —CHANCELOR ROBERTS It’s not really a climbing-training picture, but it’s still pretty cool. —TOBIAS RAU My partner Daniel and I climb on abandoned buildings for training. —MARIA YUDIN I have yet to smash the pane of glass above my bedroom door with my axes. It’ll happen at some point, I’m sure. —REBECCA LLOYD There’s always something to climb if you’re motivated enough. —AMANDA ASHLEY…

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3 minutos
access crisis in the utah desert

ESTABLISHED BY PRESIDENT OBAMA in 2016, Bears Ears National Monument spans 1.35 million acres in southeast Utah. The protected area is home to prehistoric artifacts, burial sites, Anasazi ruins, and intricate petroglyphs from the Navajo Nation, the Hopi Nation, and the Ute Mountain Tribe. Bears Ears also includes world-class rock climbing—Indian Creek, Lockhart Basin, Comb Ridge, and the Valley of the Gods. In late August, Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke submitted a memorandum recommending that Bears Ears plus nine other national monuments be re-designated as both significantly smaller and more loosely governed. In practice, this could mean that Bears Ears would be reduced by 90 percent, and open to hunting, grazing, “active timber management” (aka logging), and oil mining. We spoke with Brady Robinson, executive director of the Access Fund, about…

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2 minutos
mini-reviews

The Park, John Dickey Photographer and filmmaker John Dickey’s austere, haunting new film, The Park, takes you into the spindrift -covered, ice-bound heart of Colorado’s Rocky Mountain National Park in winter to showcase its punishing mixed climbing. With its massive storm fronts, epic winds, and sporadic ice, the park is no roadside ice cragger’s paradise. Hanging in the most miserable of conditions to film, Dickey, who spent seven years on the project, gets up-close footage of RMNP masters Steve Su, Josh Wharton, Kevin Cooper, Tommy Caldwell, and the late Hayden Kennedy scratching up the dark rock and slithering snow, and interweaves interviews with area mixed-climbing pioneers Duncan Ferguson and Malcolm Daly. As Cooper says, “It’s bad out there. It wants to eat you alive. But it becomes a natural and positive…

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