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ProcyclingProcycling

Procycling January 2017

Procycling is the monthly magazine that takes readers inside the world’s toughest sport – professional road racing. From the mud and rain of the spring Classics through to annual summer spectacular of the Tour de France, the magazine combines thoughtful, probing sports journalism and insightful interviews with incredible sports photography. The rich, often scandalous history of cycle sport and its high tech future also feature in a magazine that’s a must for every follower of the grand tours and the peloton.

País:
United Kingdom
Língua:
English
Editora:
Immediate Media Company London Limited
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ASSINATURA
US$42,02
13 Edições

NESTA EDIÇÃO

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preface

ISSUE 225 / JANUARY 2017 GUEST EDITOR You’ll notice that there is something a bit different about this month’s Procycling. Ed’s vacated the big chair and handed me the controls. I’m lucky to race at the top of the best and most beautiful sport in the world, work with great people and meet passionate fans all over the world. I had no shortage of material when choosing features. My starting point was to give a mix of stories that give an insight into the ‘racing me’ – the guy I am when I pin a number on – and some stories which simply demonstrate just how cool and exciting road racing is. So I hope you’ll enjoy perusing my 10 favourite climbs – actually, nine I love and one I hate. Some of the…

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gallery

Gent Six-Day Belgium 16 November 2016 Local hero Iljo Keissepaces Elia Viviani aroundthe vertiginous bankedtrack at 't Kuipkevelodrome on the secondday of the Gent Six. Keisse and Viviani wouldbe denied the overall winby a last-gasp attackfrom Mark Cavendishand Bradley Wiggins Koppenbergcross Belgium 1 November 2016 The U23 world champion,Eli Iserbyt of Belgium,tackles a hill in theKoppenbergcross eventen route to the win. The Koppenbergcrossincludes the lower slopesof the eponymous climb,which is a key part of theTour of Flanders Gent Six-Day Belgium 16 November 2016 Bradley Wiggins tries toenjoy a bit of peace andquiet and some time off hisfeet in a break from therelentless schedule at theGent Six. Wiggins went intothe 2016 event as a formerwinner - he paired withMatthew Gilmore in 2003and took victory then aswell, following secondplace in 2002. Initially, it was understoodthat the Gent Six Day wouldbe Wiggins's competitivefarewell, but his…

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tdu comes of age

It says something about the longevity of the race, and the niche that it has carved out for itself in the cycling calendar that the Tour Down Under is one of the more reliable things about the sport. It is 18 years since the first edition kicked off, and since then it has established itself firmly as the defining season-opening race. Ambitious visionaries make noises about organising a calendar with races that could equal or even supplant the Tour de France but nobody ever, ever suggests changing the Tour Down Under. The race retains the formula that has worked, with some tweaks, since the very beginning, with fairly short stages, not too much climbing, warm weather and extremely fit and motivated home riders. Since it joined the WorldTour ithas beefed up…

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edward pickering team sizes and democracy

It looks like we’ll have teams of nine at the Grand Tours and eight at the Classics in 2017, after the organisers’ late and clumsy attempt to reduce numbers was protested by teams and overruled by the UCI. The decision was announced in late November, after most teams had finalised their rosters and planned their calendars. It isn’t surprising it went down badly. It’s a shame it was so handled so badly, because the fallout became political and so an interesting debate – whether fewer riders would be a good idea – was lost in the noise. The idea is that having fewer riders per team should make races safer. Riders will still take risks and encounter bad luck but a less crowded road is a safer road. The more subjective argument is…

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adrien niyonshuti

What’s the best thing aboutriding your bike? I just feel better about things. I feel more open, happier for some reason. What’s your favourite race? That would be the Olympic Road Race in Rio de Janeiro. I had mechanical problems and I crashed which meant I didn’t finish but it was a defining experience for me, racing with a lot of stars from around the world. Who is the funniest rider onyour team? There are a few in this team, like Youcef [Reguigui] and Natneal [Berhane]. We laugh a lot and it helps us fight harder in races. What was your hardest dayon the bike? Just one? Every day is hard! In training it’s hard because you are working to improve yourself and in races it’s hard because you are up against the world’s best. Social media: is…

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david gaudu

Winner of the Tour de l’Aveniraged just 20, David Gaudulooks every bit France’s nextbig thing. Indeed, he has already signeda full contract with FDJ. This kid looks like he should be gettingFrench fans excited, right? Correct. The Breton is a pure climber who has bossed the French hilly races and has already proven he can mix it with the pros. He was fifth at the Tour de l’Ain in August as a stagiaire with FDJ. Any other successes worth pointing out? Apart from Tour de l’Avenir, he also won a stage and the GC at the Course de la Paix U23. He was third at the French National U23 Champs and won on home turf at the L’Estivale Bretonne this year. In total, he picked up nine wins in 2016. A Breton? So the next…

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