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Super StreetSuper Street

Super Street

July 2019

Super Street is dedicated to the personalization and performance enhancement of compact cars. You'll receive in each issue, a great combination of extensive technical information and unparalleled feature coverage of the fast-growing aftermarket in performance compact cars!

País:
United States
Língua:
English
Editora:
TEN: The Enthusiast Network
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12 Edições

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super street

EditorialContent Director Matt RodriguezEditor Sam DuManaging Editor Courtney McKinnonOnline Editor Bob HernandezProduction Editor Josh ChingSocial Media Director Brandon ScarpelliSocial Media Specialist Ceso BagayArtArt Director Alina AvanesyanCreative Director Alan MuirContributorsAaron Bonk, Larry Chen, Renz Dimaandal, Benjamin Hunting, David Ishikawa, Patrick Lauder, Darren Martin, Viet Nguyen, Danh Phan, Jon Sibal, Streetmetal, Jonathan Wong, Micah WrightAdvertisingGeneral Manager Rudy RivasAssociate General Manager Willie YeeEastern Sales Director Michael Essex 863-860-6023Western Sales Director Scott Timberlake 310-531-5969Advertising Operations Manager Monica HernandezAdvertising Coordinator Lorraine McCrawSales Assistant Yvette FrostTEN: Publishing Media, LLCChairman Greg MaysPresident Kevin MullanSVP, Editorial & Advertising Operations Amy DiamondGM, Aftermarket Automotive Network Tim FossGM, In-Market Automotive Network Maria JamisonSenior Director, Finance Catherine TemkinConsumer Marketing, Enthusiast Media Subscription Company, Inc.SVP, Circulation Tom SlaterVP, Retention & Operations Fulfillment Donald T. Robinson IIIVP, Acquisition & Database Marketing Victoria LinehanVP,…

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is jdm dying?

Once upon a time, anything forged from the factories of NISMO, HKS, TRD, Mugen, or other Japanese companies was highly coveted and basically instant gold in the North American enthusiast community. Not only did these brands build some of the sickest demo cars in history, but they also manufactured the JDM parts you and I would sell our kidneys for. When someone threw out the term “JDM,” it didn’t just mean something imported from Japan—it was also associated with exceptional engineering, quality materials, and proven performance. Fast-forward to 2019 and we’re living in a much different world. The catalog cars we often salivated over are now overlooked in favor of riveted-on widebodies, multi-piece wheels, and air suspension. Forced-induction kits from overseas are more expensive and modest in power compared to…

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shindig at shinku

Our Toyo Tires calendar is something we look forward to every year—and not just because we get to snap photos of the new Toyo girls. For the past few years, we’ve organized a series of dope car meets that go along with the calendar’s launch. Every January, we’ve hosted a very successful meet in our own backyard, in Southern California (last two years at the Honda Center in Anaheim); however, a secondary meet has floated around to various cities that include San Francisco, Miami, Honolulu, Atlanta, and Houston. Putting together a meet in January has its challenges, though, and we’re always rolling the dice on the weather. This year, we decided to head back to Texas and pushed the date to March in order to give those winter woes some…

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bow in the presence of greatness

Twelve years is a long time to own and build a project car. In a day and age when many projects are built and flipped as soon as they’re completed, one has to wonder: Why wouldn’t you enjoy what time (aside from money) has afforded you to enjoy? It took Tony Lee 12 long years to get his Subaru STI to this level of greatness. What was once simply a daily driver is now the culmination of collecting the rarest of parts and using hard work and effort to build this ultimate project car.An avid car enthusiast since the mid-’90s, Tony admired the Japanese supercars of those days (like the MK4 Supra and FD RX-7) from a distance but could only afford to modify an Accord his parents helped get…

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30 years & counting

Anyone who knows anything about Subaru is familiar with its performance division known as STI (Subaru Tecnica International). What some of you may not know is STI has been around since 1988 (older than some of you), and it consists of only a small number of employees (a little more than a hundred). STI is behind all of Subaru’s motorsport programs and it’s responsible for all the performance models you’ve idolized over the years. So, to celebrate its 30th birthday, the small department of gearheads organized an event at Fuji Speedway called STI Motorsport Day. Normally, this event is reserved for the press and media to get an annual briefing of Subaru’s latest projects; however, this year, in celebration of three decades, the gates were opened to all Subaru fans…

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sacriliocious

Death, taxes, and the agony of rotary purists: three things that can be counted on from now until the end of time—especially if you decide to build a car like Khiem Pham’s ’93 Mazda RX-7. At first glance, Khiem’s FD might appear to be your typical well-developed, piston-free street warrior, but pop the hood and you’ll be confronted by the Wankel enthusiast’s natural enemy: a Toyota 2JZ-GTE.“When I was young, maybe 15, 16 years old, I would flip back and forth about whether I wanted a Supra or an RX-7,” he explains. “I had recently sold a project and was looking for my next one, and an old friend suggested I look into FDs. When I saw how much cheaper they were compared to Supras of the same vintage, I…

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