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category_outlined / Auto et Moto
AutomobileAutomobile

Automobile August 2019

Automobile is an award-winning automotive publication that captures the passion and experience of driving great cars. Featuring engaging writing and stunning photography, Automobile transports readers with each and every issue. Discover a well-rounded editorial mix focused on design, technology, automotive art, vintage cars, and industry trends.

Pays:
United States
Langue:
English
Éditeur:
TEN: The Enthusiast Network
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J'ACHÈTE CE NUMÉRO
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12 Numéros

DANS CE NUMÉRO

access_time1 min.
automobile

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Michael Floyd INTERNATIONAL BUREAU CHIEF Angus MacKenzie EXECUTIVE EDITOR Mac Morrison CREATIVE DIRECTOR Darren Scott DETROIT BUREAU CHIEF Todd Lassa SENIOR EDITOR Nelson Ireson SENIOR EDITOR Aaron Gold FEATURES EDITOR Rory Jurnecka MANAGING EDITOR Rusty Kurtz SENIOR COPY EDITOR Jesse Bishop COPY EDITOR Claire Crowley MANAGING ART DIRECTOR Mike Royer EUROPEAN BUREAU CHIEF George Kacher AUTOMOTIVE DESIGN EDITOR Robert Cumberford NEW YORK BUREAU CHIEF Jamie Kitman EDITOR-AT-LARGE Arthur St. Antoine AUTOMOBILE DIGITAL SENIOR EDITOR Erik Johnson ONLINE EDITOR Ed Tahaney DAILY NEWS EDITOR Conner Golden PRODUCTION EDITOR Eleonor Segura DIRECTOR, SOCIAL MEDIA Brandon Scarpelli SOCIAL MEDIA EDITOR Billy Rehbock CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Ronald Ahrens, Jethro Bovingdon, Zach Bowman, Jon Alain Guzik, Michael Jordan, Bob Merlis, Chris Nelson, Marc Noordeloos, Andy Pilgrim, Steven Cole Smith, Basem Wasef, Michael Whiteley CONTRIBUTING ARTISTS Daniel Byrne, Jim Fets, Martyn Goddard, Steffen Jahn, Robert Kerian, Julia LaPalme, James Lipman, Charlie Magee, Richard Pardon, Tim Marrs, A.J. Mueller, Tom Salt, Jürgen Skarwan,…

access_time4 min.
someday, i hope

IT SITS ALONE in the cold, darkened one-car garage, tires slowly flat spotting. The interior has developed that fragrant eau de mildew aroma. It’s been close to a decade since the engine turned over. Every time I see it, I wince. Then I start to fantasize, to calculate how much it would take to get it running again, or better yet to really do it up right. But once the dollars start adding up in my head, I realize yet again that I have neither the time nor the money. Heck, I don’t even live in the same state as the car. I’d hate to have to sell it, but I’m starting to think I should. That, or maybe it’ll end up as one of those barn finds in a couple…

access_time11 min.
never lift

THE ALLEYWAY BEHIND Bruce Meyer’s garage in Beverly Hills, California, isn’t quite like back alleys elsewhere in Los Angeles County. For instance, most of them don’t have valet parking for famous designer boutiques lining the pavement. And they certainly don’t have five purebred vintage race cars (three of which won Le Mans) idling impatiently, waves of heat rising from their lightweight alloy engine lids. Meyer is seated at the front of the line in the achingly gorgeous, silver 1957 Ferrari 625/250 Testa Rossa, grinning like an 8-year-old boy, ready to get this high-octane show on the road. We’ve spent the past couple hours inside Meyer’s car cave, a restored former parking garage where these multimillion-dollar pieces of automotive history were lowered, one by one, to ground level by means of a…

access_time8 min.
back in ’73

ERIC WHITE HAS an obsession with painting cars from the 1970s. But the accomplished artist’s reverence for and reverential renderings of Malaise Era vehicles isn’t some sort of retro-millennial Radwood fetish. Rather, it’s about re-examining and unpacking his childhood. A 50-year-old graduate of the Rhode Island School of Design, adjunct professor at Manhattan’s School of Visual Arts, and recipient of a prestigious New York Foundation for the Arts grant, White was born in Ann Arbor, Michigan, about 45 minutes west of Detroit. He grew up connected to the Motor City, where his grandfathers worked in the domestic auto industry and both sets of his grandparents lived. But his experience in a college town—Ann Arbor is home to the University of Michigan—offered up other vehicular perspectives. “We had a Toyota Corolla wagon growing…

access_time4 min.
rocking in the key of g

THE NEW-FOR-2019 Mercedes-AMG G 63 may look like a sport utility vehicle, but it’s not. I mean, fine, if you’re going to go all Microsoft Excel on me, then OK, technically that’s how you’d classify the thing. But labeling the G 63 an SUV is like calling an eight-course tasting menu at Le Bernardin “chow.” That’s because the G 63 isn’t a mere vehicle—it’s a magnificent, totally implausible masterpiece of mechanical art. Those familiar with the lore know the Mercedes Geländewagen (“cross-country vehicle”) was born as a military machine and has gone largely unchanged since 1979. It’s boxy, utilitarian, and more army barracks than penthouse suite. But along the way the G-Wagen has also become a cool, battle-ready sport ute of choice for the rich and those who want to look…

access_time6 min.
moving forward to go back again

IT’S A BRISK and sunny Italian morning in March when, after a short walk from a nearby businessman’s hotel, we find ourselves strolling among the famous concept cars set up in a kind of mini museum format at Pininfarina SpA’s Italian headquarters in Cambiano, outside of Turin. My host arrives presently. Having met up with company chairman Paolo Pininfarina at the Geneva show, where he helped launch Automobili Pininfarina’s all-electric Battista hypercar (“By Design,” July), we’ve followed the silver-haired executive—world weary and harried but dapper, loquacious, and charming—back to Cambiano. Pininfarina speaks animatedly about these show cars, detailing their back stories and proudly outlining their impact on future production models. From the epochal Cisitalia to the Lancia Florida II and Ferrari P6, precursor to the BB Berlinettas, they represent a small…

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