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category_outlined / Auto et Moto
Chevy High PerformanceChevy High Performance

Chevy High Performance October 2019

Get Chevy High Performance digital magazine subscription today for the automotive source for all Chevy aficionados whose interests entail buying, building, restoring, and modifying high-performance Chevrolet vehicles.

Pays:
United States
Langue:
English
Éditeur:
TEN: The Enthusiast Network
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J'ACHÈTE CE NUMÉRO
8,26 $(TVA Incluse)
JE M'ABONNE
16,54 $(TVA Incluse)
12 Numéros

DANS CE NUMÉRO

access_time3 min.
the great restomod debate

Apparently, the July 2019 issue with the tag line Restomods Rule! on the cover hit a nerve with a few of the more “mature” Chevy High Performance magazine readers as they voiced their opinion on our social media sites (Instagram and Facebook) regarding the term “restomod” being used incorrectly in relation to the car featured on the cover. It seems that some folks feel the word restomod insinuates there are or should be hard-line limitations to the number and kind of modifications a car has received, therefore excluding it from the restomod party. The car being referenced is a 1970 Nova with a variety of upgrades ranging from an LT4 engine, aftermarket suspension components, new rearend, bigger brakes, larger diameter wheels and tires, exhaust, rollcage, and bucket seats, along with…

access_time1 min.
chevy high performance

EDITORIAL Network Content Director Douglas Glad Network Director, Street Rod & Super Chevy Groups Brian Brennan Editor Nick Licata Managing Editor Bill Klein Group Tech Editor Jim Smart Feature Editor Taylor Kempkes Contributing Editors Bruce Biegler Jeg Coughlin Jr. Grant Cox Jeff Huneycutt Barry Kluczyk Jason Lubken Jason Matthew Robert McGaffin Ro McGonegal Evan Perkins ART DIRECTION & DESIGN Design Director Markas Platt Art Director Danilo Silverio THE SUPER CHEVY NETWORK ON THE WEB www.chevyhiperformance.com www.superchevy.com www.vetteweb.com ADVERTISING Network Advertising Director Angela Schoof-Ousley Eastern Sales Director Michael Essex (863) 860-6023 Western Sales Director Scott Timberlake (310) 531-5969 Ad Operations Manager Monica Hernandez Ad Operations Coordinator Patty Ludi Executive Assistant Amy Watson Event Coordinator Yasmin Fajatin TEN: PUBLISHING MEDIA, LLC Chairman Greg Mays President Kevin Mullan SVP, Editorial & Advertising Operations Amy Diamond General Manager, Automotive Network Tim Foss Senior Director, Finance Catherine Temkin CONSUMER MARKETING, ENTHUSIAST MEDIA SUBSCRIPTION COMPANY, INC. SVP, Circulation Tom Slater VP, Retention & Operations Fulfillment Donald T. Robinson III VP, Acquisition & Database Marketing Victoria Linehan VP, Newsstand…

access_time3 min.
spotlight

Clean Slate Camaro Arizona’s Buddy Jensen is typical of many Sportsman drag racers out there; despite limited returns, he stays the course. While not collecting any major event prizes (yet) during his 12-plus-year career stint racing his F/SA 1967 Camaro, Jensen and his wife, Linda, still enjoy the chase. Using a self-assembled 350ci engine (rated by NHRA at 286 hp), Buddy has so far coaxed a best time of 10.86 from his machine while racing pretty much exclusively within NHRA’s West Coast divisional and national event scenes. The Jensens fund their racing weekends as 100-percent independents. Buddy’s trade is selling machine shop equipment (J&J Sales), but they also use their Camaro to help advertise their family owned Collette’s Uniform company. This well-maintained Camaro features DuPont Firecracker Red paint. Buddy reports that…

access_time6 min.
retro nova relives its days of glory

It’s August 16, 1977, and a longhaired 16-year-old kid in sunny Southern California brings home his first hot rod: a dark-green 1972 Chevy Nova. Imagine that moment of freedom every heavy-footed teenager dreams about. On his drive home, over the roar of his new small-block, he hears the AM radio newscaster announce, “42-year-old Elvis Presley was announced dead today.” A day Dennis Taylor remembers like it was yesterday. You don’t forget your first car. It’s a rite of passage, the first taste of freedom. If you’re lucky enough, or smart enough like Dennis, you hold on to it. But the Retro Nova took a lifetime of transformations and 32 years of lying dormant under a cover before it became the 7-second, 3,000-some-odd-horsepower car it is today. He bought it with his $900…

access_time13 min.
preaching tolerance

Bearing clearance is one of the fundamental aspects of engine building and one that continues to spark debate and divisive opinions—and as with everything from nitrous systems to eating chocolate, there’s a balance to strike between just right and regret. In an engine, the critical bearing clearances we’re talking about are for the mains and connecting rods; and the clearance is the amount of space between the shaft and bearing surface that’s filled with the vital, lubricating cushion of oil, known as the hydrodynamic wedge. And it ain’t much of a cushion. Even if the installed gap between the bearing and shaft is only 0.0015-inch, the oil is displaced with the loaded bearings. The oil wedge lifts the shaft when it starts rotating to keep it moving with minimal friction, but that…

access_time6 min.
bat wing bomb

We always get a little excited when we see a car flying out of our youth, especially one that’s always been relatively obscure and usually overlooked by most. If you like one of these loads you’re probably wired with a subjective personality and happily situated a step or two off the mainstream, like we are. Ours was a late-build 1960 fixed with a 350-horse 348 garbage truck motor that was strung with three carburetors. Rebuilding that hinky trio in 1962 was a trip though, huh? When we were finished, there were only a few extra bits left over, but who cared? We were playing hot rodder, putting hands on the churl, gaining some sort of stature even if it was in our own cockamamie brain. Although our Biscuit never got beyond a…

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