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Classic Toy TrainsClassic Toy Trains

Classic Toy Trains March 2019

CLASSIC TOY TRAINS BRINGS YOU O AND S GAUGE FOR THE OPERATOR AND COLLECTOR. SEE THE NEWEST TRAINS FROM LIONEL, MTH, ATLAS O AND OTHERS; LEARN ABOUT TRACK PLANNING, WIRING AND LAYOUT CONSTRUCTION; IDENTIFY AND REPAIR OLD LIONEL AND AMERICAN FLYER TRAINS; AND VISIT THE MOST INSPIRING TOY TRAIN LAYOUTS EVER BUILT.

Pays:
United States
Langue:
English
Éditeur:
Kalmbach Publishing Co. - Magazines
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J'ACHÈTE CE NUMÉRO
9,72 $(TVA Incluse)
JE M'ABONNE
55,60 $(TVA Incluse)
9 Numéros

DANS CE NUMÉRO

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a new column from an old friend

This month’s cover story continues a long line of comprehensive articles by long-time contributor Joe Algozzini and Senior Editor Roger Carp examining Lionel’s postwar era outfits on a year-by-year basis. In this issue, Joe and Roger turn back the clock 70 years to the pivotal year of 1949. Having recorded record sales in 1948, and looking ahead to its 50th anniversary in 1950, Lionel was at the top of its game in 1949. The result was a dazzling number of memorable sets from the very affordable to the undeniably lavish. You can read all about them in this issue, starting on page 40. No doubt about it – no publication comes close to matching Classic Toy Trains when it comes to entertaining, well-researched, and beautifully illustrated coverage of the hobby we share. Right…

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do you have a story?

Readers just like you provide stories featured in Classic Toy Trains. To submit an article and photos, send your work to Classic Toy Trains magazine, 21027 Crossroads Circle, P.O. Box 1612, Waukesha, WI 53187. Write the words “Manuscript Enclosed” on the envelope. Articles and photographs are paid for on acceptance. We assume no responsibility for the safe return of unsolicited material. Send email submissions to manuscripts@classictoytrains.com. Before preparing an article, contact us to determine whether we’re interested. Guidelines for writing articles and taking photographs are available from our website. If you are a manufacturer or supplier and would like to see your products in our News or Reviews columns, please email editor@classictoytrains.com, or call 262-796-8776 for more information. Classic Toy Trains assumes that letters, new product information, and other unsolicited materials are contributed gratis.…

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variations for flyer collectors

Scarce variations When I returned home from an out-of-town trip, I discovered my December 2018 issue of Classic Toy Trains in my mailbox. As soon as I had a chance I read Mark Suek’s “New Haven freight cars filled the Flyer line” article, which was very well done. I did note the discussion about the no. 25082 New Haven Hay-jector boxcar failed to mention that author Joe Deger states in Greenberg’s Guide to American Flyer S Gauge Vol. I that the no. 25082 has a gray-lettered variation as opposed to the typical white lettering. The gray-lettered car is scarce and usually commands a higher price. I do not know for sure why some of the cars have gray lettering, but I believe it can be attributed to a contamination of the white ink/paint. That…

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photo album

JOHN LEMON’S O GAUGE LAYOUT What has turned out to be a lifelong fascination with miniature trains took hold of John Lemon more than 70 years ago in his native South Africa. His father bought him Lionel outfit no. 2103W, which featured the no. 224 steam locomotive and tender as well as some of the freight cars captured in John’s photograph passing through this grade crossing guarded by a Lionel no. 45 automatic gateman. John, who resides in the city of Port Elizabeth, has since assembled an immense collection of toy trains that also includes American Flyer S gauge and British and German HO scale engines and rolling stock. CHIP KESSLER’S S GAUGE LAYOUT An American Flyer no. 21918 Seaboard Baldwin diesel switcher has braked to a halt on Chip Kessler’s S gauge…

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new column for a new era

Things change: This is just the plain old truth. Change is going to happen whether we like it or not. And when change affects things we love, like model railroading, we tend to get a bit nervous. I tend, however, to be an optimist. I’m not looking through rose-colored glasses, however. Let’s look at how change has worked for the better in our hobby. When the original Lionel Corp. licensed the rights to manufacture and market its toy trains to General Mills subsidiary Model Products Corp. (MPC), after 1969, it probably felt like the end of the world to many hobbyists. It truly was not! To the contrary, the change introduced the so-called modern era. To be specific, it brought on the MPC era at Lionel. People often smirk that MPC is the Rodney…

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visit a vintage “hobby shop”

While I’m too young to have visited a hobby shop in the 1950s or ’60s, I can experience what it might have been like by watching John Truckenbrod’s postwar Lionel collection on video. Model Railroader Video Plus has launched a new series called Truck’s Toy Trains, and part 1 is available for free at MRVideoPlus.com/TTT1. John wanted to re-create a vintage hobby shop that specialized in Lionel products, and he’s done a fantastic job. He’s organized and displayed the items in a neat and attractive way. Not only does he have an amazing collection of rolling stock, separate-sale items, and starter sets but there also are related supplies like track cleaner, smoke pellets, and even Ray-O-Vac batteries. Across from the “hobby shop” is an operating O gauge layout that features his boyhood…

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