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Classic Toy TrainsClassic Toy Trains

Classic Toy Trains November 2019

CLASSIC TOY TRAINS BRINGS YOU O AND S GAUGE FOR THE OPERATOR AND COLLECTOR. SEE THE NEWEST TRAINS FROM LIONEL, MTH, ATLAS O AND OTHERS; LEARN ABOUT TRACK PLANNING, WIRING AND LAYOUT CONSTRUCTION; IDENTIFY AND REPAIR OLD LIONEL AND AMERICAN FLYER TRAINS; AND VISIT THE MOST INSPIRING TOY TRAIN LAYOUTS EVER BUILT.

Pays:
United States
Langue:
English
Éditeur:
Kalmbach Publishing Co. - Magazines
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J'ACHÈTE CE NUMÉRO
9,64 $(TVA Incluse)
JE M'ABONNE
55,15 $(TVA Incluse)
9 Numéros

DANS CE NUMÉRO

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what makes a layout great?

What makes a good model railroad? That’s easy. A good model railroad looks and operates the way its builder intended. It’s your layout, and you are the only judge of how well it meets your vision of how it should look and what it should do. Let’s shift the goal posts, and ask what elevates a model railroad from “good” to “great”. The question is no longer how well the layout pleases its builder, but how it serves to inspire the rest of us. Of course, that’s where everything gets tricky. A guy who appreciates postwar Lionel or American Flyer products as nostalgic and collectible playthings has a very different point of view than a guy operating realistically detailed modern-era trains in a scale-size miniature world. Is there any common ground? Never one…

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do you have a story?

Readers just like you provide stories featured in Classic Toy Trains. To submit an article and photos, send your work to Classic Toy Trains magazine, 21027 Crossroads Circle, P.O. Box 1612, Waukesha, WI 53187. Write the words “Manuscript Enclosed” on the envelope. Articles and photographs are paid for on acceptance. We assume no responsibility for the safe return of unsolicited material. Send email submissions to manuscripts@classictoytrains.com. Before preparing an article, contact us to determine whether we’re interested. Guidelines for writing articles and taking photographs are available from our website. If you are a manufacturer or supplier and would like to see your products in our News or Reviews columns, please email editor@classictoytrains.com, or call 262-796-8776 for more information. Classic Toy Trains assumes that letters, new product information, and other unsolicited materials are contributed gratis.…

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classic toy trains

OUR MISSION Classic Toy Trains is the indispensable source for toy train hobbyists. Our mission is to enhance our readers’ enjoyment of the toy train hobby by publishing useful information and engaging insights about layouts, how-to projects, and hobby news and heritage. William Zuback Photography Supervisor Sue Hollinger-Klahn Production Specialist Lori Schneider Ad Sales Manager Martha Stanczak Ad Sales Representative Mike Ferguson Ad Sales Representative Kalmbach Media Dan Hickey Chief Executive Officer Christine Metcalf Senior Vice President, Finance Nicole McGuire Senior Vice President, Consumer Marketing Stephen C. George Vice President, Content Brian J. Schmidt Vice President, Operations Sarah A. Horner Vice President, Human Resources David T. Sherman Senior Director, Advertising Sales and Events Scott Redmond Advertising Sales Director Liz Runyon Circulation Director Michael Soliday Director of Design and Production Cathy Daniels New Business Manager Kathy Steele Retention Manager Kim Redmond Single Copy Specialist…

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toy trains at thanksgiving? absolutely!

FAMILY AND TRAINS For a number of years, my cousin’s family has hosted a huge Thanksgiving gathering – 30 or more of us each year, across four generations. For about 12 years, the “kids games” responsibility I inherited meant bringing after-dinner games for kids ranging from 3 to 17 years of age, along with appropriate prizes. To change things up a few years ago (and a couple of times since), I brought two O gauge trains, two loops of O-31 track, a vintage Lionel ZW transformer, and craft supplies, including clear tape, gaffer tape, white glue, safety scissors, and construction paper. I also had small containers, cardboard tubes, straws, foam trays, stickers, plastic caps, and many other odds and ends. Here’s how this family holiday train tradition works. After everyone has finished eating, two…

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photo album

THOMAS PIRECKI’S O GAUGE DISPLAY The O gauge display Thomas Pirecki finished brings to mind memories from the 1950s. Have we walked past a hobby shop showing off a Lionel set and some Plasticville kits? Are we peeking into the bedroom of a boy whose hobbies include trains, sports, and patches and buttons? Tom assembled this display in Lewes, Del., to capture his interests. LEW SCHNEIDER’S O GAUGE MODEL RAILROAD Visit Lew Schneider in Waban, Mass., and you’re sure to see something on his O gauge layout not often found elsewhere. Take this French model of a locomotive at the head of a freight train. Framing it are Lionel no. 151 semaphores. NANCY LAGOMARSINO AND JACQUES VERDIER’S O GAUGE LAYOUT After an article about the outdoor O gauge railroad built by Nancy Lagomarsino and Jacques…

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k-line: jack of all trades

K-Line is an interesting part of the Modern Era story. The firm began making O gauge track in the late 1970s, expanded to basic trains based on Marx tooling, and went on to make some of the nicest scale-detailed locomotives out there. K-Line entered the O gauge market at the start of a wave of unprecedented growth. In a market where prices bordered on crazy, it set out to develop affordable locomotives, cars, and structures based on tooling from defunct companies. Who were K-Line’s target audiences? They were operators, folks new to the market, and people getting back into the hobby. Almost everyone. K-Line’s prices leaned toward the lower end of the spectrum, though I recently checked out the price of a former Marxtooling tank car I bought in the early 1990s and…

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