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Classic Toy TrainsClassic Toy Trains

Classic Toy Trains January 2019

CLASSIC TOY TRAINS BRINGS YOU O AND S GAUGE FOR THE OPERATOR AND COLLECTOR. SEE THE NEWEST TRAINS FROM LIONEL, MTH, ATLAS O AND OTHERS; LEARN ABOUT TRACK PLANNING, WIRING AND LAYOUT CONSTRUCTION; IDENTIFY AND REPAIR OLD LIONEL AND AMERICAN FLYER TRAINS; AND VISIT THE MOST INSPIRING TOY TRAIN LAYOUTS EVER BUILT.

Pays:
United States
Langue:
English
Éditeur:
Kalmbach Publishing Co. - Magazines
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Offre spéciale : The week´s top pick!
J'ACHÈTE CE NUMÉRO
11,11 $(TVA Incluse)
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55,60 $(TVA Incluse)
9 Numéros

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toy trains are still alive on tv

Electric trains have enjoyed a special relationship with television since the medium gained a foothold in American households after World War II. They have at times faded to the background, but now, thanks to a popular new series, trains again play an important role on TV. Good news for dedicated hobbyists! The opportunity to go behind the scenes at Warner Bros. Studios to see the O gauge layout used on the set of Young Sheldon thrilled me. I hope my article about the show and its brilliant if occasionally exasperating hero will convey how much fun photographer Steve Crise and I had when we spent a day with the show’s production crew as well as the employees of the store that had built the layout for the set. Everything moved along after…

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do you have a story?

Readers just like you provide stories featured in Classic Toy Trains. To submit an article and photos, send your work to Classic Toy Trains magazine, 21027 Crossroads Circle, P.O. Box 1612, Waukesha, WI 53187. Write the words “Manuscript Enclosed” on the envelope and include a suitable stamped, self-addressed envelope for the return of your material if we cannot use it. Articles and photographs are paid for on acceptance. We assume no responsibility for the safe return of unsolicited material. Email submissions can be sent to manuscripts@classictoytrains.com. Before preparing an article, contact us to determine whether we’re interested. Guidelines for writing articles and taking photographs are available from our website. If you are a manufacturer or supplier and would like to see your products in our News or Reviews columns, please email editor@classictoytrains.com, or…

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more on lionel’s monon boxcars

Hoosier Line models The description of the Lionel no. 9230 (November 2018 Collectible Classics) as having an “oxide red or Tuscan red sheet-metal frame” is incorrect. Early 9200-series boxcars have blackened steel frames. I obtained my no. 9230 in 1971 by mail from a Lionel dealer who used to advertise in Model Railroader magazine. My 9230 has blackened steel door guides top and bottom, which suggests earlier production than the example shown in the article (above). The white markings on my 9230 are identical to those on your example, including the 1-72 built date. The Chicago, Indianapolis & Louisville RR changed its name to Monon RR in January 1956. The stylized-M “teepee” herald was adopted at that time. Monon was highly visible in railroading publications, where toymakers often looked for ideas, when the Lionel Corporation…

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photo album

JOSEPH OLEXA’S O GAUGE DISPLAY For the past 10 years, O gauge modeler Joseph Olexa has been creating a temporary Christmas display at his place of employment in Tucson, Ariz. His motive? To make the holiday season more enjoyable for the men and women working alongside him while introducing them to the many pleasures associated with toy trains. The wintry scenery and figures must feel right at home in the desert of Arizona! KENT FRANKLIN’S O GAUGE LAYOUT There’s no better excuse than Christmas for bringing your toy trains out of storage and letting them stretch their muscles on a layout assembled to fit under a decorated tree. Kent Franklin couldn’t agree more. He follows that recipe for delight when the holidays approach in Henderson, Nev. Among the stars on his O gauge…

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product news

FOUR SILOS OF FUN: A towering railserved business is the latest O gauge structure from Menards. The no. 279-4434 American Materials Plant is a fully assembled structure standing 16½ inches high with four silos above a 6-inch tall runthrough loading bay for hoppers or gondolas. The building’s base is 61/4 inches wide and 53/4 inches long. The structure is weathered gray with two American Materials illuminated signs. The signs are animated and depict an American flag waving in the breeze. Eight white security lights, four blinking aircraft warning lights, and two worker figures complete the scene. Included are 14 peel-and-stick signs allowing users to label the silos for a wide range of materials, including sand, gravel, coal, and grain. The accessory requires a Menards no. 279-4062 or no. 279-4050 4.5-volt…

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holiday overhaul

PART TWO Christmas is just around the corner so it’s time to make sure seasonal train displays are ready to deliver holiday fun – toy train style! Last month I covered the basics of checking over your transformer and track. Now we’ll turn the spotlight on locomotives and rolling stock. Oil and grease Before trying to run anything, I recommend doing a preliminary inspection. Now is the time to replace broken or missing parts. The next step is a general lubrication of each locomotive. The basic rule of thumb is to oil anything that spins within something else and use grease on gears, as shown in the photos at right. Specifically, I oil the ends of the armature shaft on the motor while trying to avoid getting any oil or grease on the brushes or commutator.…

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