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DecanterDecanter

Decanter Dec-2018

Published by Time Inc. (UK) Ltd The world’s best wine magazine. It is simply the “wine bible”. Every month it provides recommendations on the world’s finest wines and tells you where you can find them. From top Bordeaux to the best value wine on the shelf, Decanter guides you through a maze of wine to help you find the right wine for you. It also offers interviews with leading wine personalities, in-depth guides to the wine regions and the latest wine news.

Pays:
United Kingdom
Langue:
English
Éditeur:
Time Inc. (UK) Ltd
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12 Numéros

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cramant, champagne laurent-perrier

Sunrise over the Cramant vineyards, located in one of only six grand cru villages in the Côte des Blancs area of Champagne, just south of Epernay. These are Chardonnay vines, planted on the commune’s east-facing belemnite chalk slopes. The soils are up to 10m deep and are made from fossilised cuttlefish, which contributes mineral and creamy characteristics to the final wine. The vineyards pictured cover 351ha and are owned by Champagne house Laurent-Perrier. It blends Chardonnay from Cramant with grapes from other grands crus and different vintages to make its exceptional Grand Siècle Champagne. ■…

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john stimpf ig

AFTER 34 YEARS service, Decanter is retiring its hugely prestigious Man or Woman of the Year accolade. From 2019, it will become the Decanter Hall of Fame Award.Back in 1984, the first ever Man of the Year was the late, great Serge Hochar, who put Chateau Musar and the wines of Lebanon on the world map. The most recent and now last ever recipient is Eduardo Chadwick, who did the same for Errazuriz, and Chile.In between those two remarkable bookends is a roll call of yet more fine wine titans including Bob Mondavi, Emile Peynaud, Miguel Torres, Len Evans, Piero Antinori and Nicolás Catena. All of them have quite literally changed the wine we drink.Most recipients have been vintners or winemakers, but not all. In 1996, Austrian glassmaker Georg…

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a month in wine

Sommelier exams annulled after leak THE COURT OF Master Sommeliers Americas has confirmed that ‘detailed information’ on wines forming part of the notoriously tough MS tasting exam was leaked, and that the results of the tasting part of the 2018 Master Sommelier Diploma Examination have consequently been annulled.Although candidates will be allowed to re-sit the exam, the announcement effectively stripped 23 master sommeliers of their newly earned and hard-won titles.The Court said that its board of directors voted unanimously to invalidate the results from the tasting test, which had been taken in the first week of September.This followed ‘sufficient evidence’ that the tasting exam ‘was compromised by the release of detailed information concerning wines in the tasting flight’, the Court said.It did not name the person, or persons, held…

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around the wine world

St-Emilion 2012 classification allegations denied Bordeaux’s Tribunal de Grande Instance confirmed that investigations have been opened into Hubert de Boüard, co-owner of Château Angélus, and Philippe Castéja, director of one of the region’s principal négociant houses, Borie-Manoux.The move in September followed accusations that the two men influenced the 2012 St-Emilion classification in their favour, while acting as representatives of INAO, the French National Institute of Origin and Quality.Reports said the investigation centred on suspicion of ‘prise illégale d’intérêts’, relating to cases where personal interest conflicts with a public role. The charge carries a maximum prison sentence of five years and potential fines up to €500,000. accused pair Hubert de Boüard Philippe Castéja De Boüard told police he had not taken part in the INAO deliberations relating to the…

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in brief

■ England’s bumper 2018 vintage has caused storage challenges for some UK winemakers. Charles Simpson of Simpsons Wine Estate in Kent said his team were ‘desperately trying to find more tanks’. He also urged the English wine industry to work more collaboratively in order to cope with a ‘scale problem’ in many UK wineries, highlighted by this year’s increased yields.■ Bodegas Torres has opened a new winery in Catalonia’s Costers del Segre DO to provide a permanent home for its Purgatori wine, a blend of Cariñena, Garnacha and Syrah. Named Desterrats, the estate dates back to 1770 and was once owned by Montserrat Abbey.■ English sparkling wine producer Nyetimber has launched its 1086 range, aiming to rival prestige cuvée Champagne. The white 2009 and rosé 2010 sparkling wines –…

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letters

Cellar scienceI WAS INTERESTED to read Alistair Macrow’s letter about his cellar and its temperature fluctuations (‘Notes & Queries’, November 2018). I wonder if it has not been built correctly. One of the few times I perked up and paid attention while studying mechanics at university was when we solved heat diffusion equations to determine the optimum depth for a wine cellar. Clearly, surface temperature varies with the seasons. Heat diffuses into the ground very slowly, causing seasonal variation in soil temperature. Beyond a certain point, this variation becomes negligible and the cellar will be at a constant temperature year round. If built correctly, and depending on surrounding soil types, a cellar at around 4m depth should have an acceptably stable temperature, with annual variations of a few degrees…

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