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category_outlined / Cuisine et Vin
EatingWellEatingWell

EatingWell November/December 2018

What's for dinner? Is it healthy? Is it easy? If you ask these questions, Eating Well is for you. The magazine "Where Good Taste Meets Good Health," Eating Well delivers the information and inspiration you need to make healthy eating a way of life with great, easy recipes (most take 45 minutes or less), the latest nutrition science, gorgeous photos and crisp, evocative prose.

Pays:
United States
Langue:
English
Éditeur:
Meredith Corporation
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access_time3 min.
holiday snapshots

How do you make a magazine that works for every reader’s holiday? Take me, for example: I love Thanksgiving, but I skip it almost every year, instead using that week to travel abroad. I grew up celebrating Christmas, but there’s only one recipe that remained constant: my mom’s spritz wreath cookies. A quick survey of our team here at EatingWell makes it clear that having a very personal take on the holidays is the only constant. Jim Van Fleteren, our creative director, says the sure sign of the holidays is when a relish tray appears. I had never even heard the term “relish tray,” but he’s from Michigan, which may explain it. He also texted me a beloved family holiday recipe that involves layers of strawberry Jell-O, frozen strawberries, sliced bananas and…

access_time1 min.
what’s trending @eatingwell.com

1 VEGGIE-TAINING Get inspired by our stunning seasonal vegetable sides, mains and apps, like Roasted Vegetable Antipasto (left). EatingWell.com/veggietaining 2 GIFT GUIDES It’s always more fun to give than to get! Scroll through our curated lists to find the perfect presents for food lovers. EatingWell.com/giftguide 3 COOKIE SWAPS If you enjoy a cookie swap as much as we do (our office holds one yearly), go here for 250-plus sweet recipes. EatingWell.com/cookieswap WE QUIZ YOU What’s your favorite EatingWell Thanksgiving recipe? Gingered Cranberry-Raspberry Relish Yum!!! —mpfish26 Pumpkin Tart with Pecan-Shortbread Crust For sure!—devonob Pear, Prosciutto & Hazelnut Stuffing —vrjonsie Gluten-Free Green Bean Casserole —colleendkraus Meringue-Topped Sweet Potato Casserole Sweet potato fluff. —fukesandrea Find them all at EatingWell.com/Thanksgiving…

access_time1 min.
ask our editors

Penelope Wall Senior Digital Editor What are your favorite food gifts to make? There are so many sweet treats around this time of year, so I like to make savory gifts like dried bean soup mixes or tea blends with herbs from my garden (these are both great teacher gifts too). This year, I’m excited to gift homemade body scrubs in pretty jars. Visit EatingWell.com/DIYspa to get all of my favorite recipes. Jim Romanoff Food Editor Fun ideas for turkey leftovers? My parents, who are in their 90s and still cook, are my inspiration. My mom is from Pittsburgh and makes a Devonshire: a hometown favorite open-face turkey sandwich smothered in cheese sauce. And my dad taught me to layer, cover and bake almost any leftover meat with potatoes, sauerkraut and veggies to make a version of…

access_time2 min.
lie about your age. and get away with it.

WHY AGE GRACEFULLY, WHEN YOU CAN AGE SUCCESSFULLY? Our bodies can be younger or older than our actual age depending upon diet, lifestyle choices and physical activity. This is called biological age, which could be different than the age on your driver’s license, which is called chronological age. A recent study of 900 adults who were tracked for 12 years, from ages 26-38, showed that people who were aging faster, meaning that their biological age was higher than their chronological age, were not as healthy or physically fit. This group was also more likely to show cognitive decline and was at a greater risk for age-related health conditions. Research demonstrates that the keys to aging successfully are a combination of exercising regularly, keeping engaged with life, and maintaining a healthy diet with…

access_time4 min.
letters

I’ve been an avid subscriber of numerous cooking magazines over the years, but had never heard of EatingWell until I came across an issue at my doctor’s office. The Middle Eastern theme immediately drew me in because I love it when food magazines focus on cuisine that isn’t the mainstream. I was so pleased to see the issue dedicated to different cuisines and countries ranging from Turkey to Iran to Syria and beyond. Thank you for bringing to light the delectable world of Mideast fare. You have a new subscriber! Savita Ubhayakar, Berkeley, CA Best Issue Ever The Sept/Oct issue is just incredible. I can almost smell the spices as I turn the pages. Middle Eastern cuisine is great any time of year and even more so with the fall harvest. Loved…

access_time3 min.
potatoes optional

Slow-Cooker Balsamic Short Ribs ACTIVE: 30 min TOTAL: 4½-8½ hrs EQUIPMENT: 6-qt. or larger slow cooker Now here’s a slow-cooker recipe you can serve to company—even on a holiday. A bold Italian red that has a touch of sweetness (think amarone or brunello) is perfect alongside. 6 bone-in beef short ribs (about 3¼ pounds)¾ teaspoon salt, divided½ teaspoon ground pepper2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil, divided1 medium onion, sliced2 tablespoons tomato paste2 cloves garlic, chopped1 teaspoon chopped fresh thyme1 cup balsamic vinegar½ cup low-sodium beef broth2 tablespoons cornstarch¼ cup waterChopped fresh parsley (optional) 1. Sprinkle ribs with ½ teaspoon salt and pepper. Heat 1 tablespoon oil in a large skillet over medium-high heat. Add the ribs and cook until browned on all sides, about 5 minutes total. Transfer to a 6-quart or larger slow cooker. 2. Add…

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