menu
close
search
DÉCOUVRIRBIBLIOTHÈQUEMAGAZINES
CATÉGORIES
  • Art et Architecture
  • Aviation et Bateau
  • Business et Finance
  • Auto et Moto
  • Presse people
  • Comics & Manga
  • Artisanat
  • Culture et Littérature
  • Famille et Éducation
  • Mode
  • Cuisine et Vin
  • Forme et Santé
  • Maison et Jardin
  • Chasse et Pêche
  • Jeunesse
  • Luxe
  • Presse Masculine
  • Film, Télé et Musique
  • Actualité et politiques
  • Photographie
  • Science
  • Sports
  • Tech et Jeux Vidéo
  • Voyages et Plein air
  • Presse Feminine
  • Adulte
SÉLECTION DU JOUR
DÉCOUVRIRBIBLIOTHÈQUE
searchclose
shopping_cart_outlined
exit_to_app
category_outlined / Maison et Jardin
House & HomeHouse & Home

House & Home August 2018 - Small & Exquisite: The Small Spaces Issue

Each issue, you'll tour beautiful homes, discover exciting new stores and products and be inspired by decorating advice from design authority Lynda Reeves, editor Beth Hitchcock and a host of talented designers and stylists. Get House & Home digital magazine subscription today for DIY projects, recipes and tips on entertaining, and meet the hottest designers making news.

Pays:
Canada
Langue:
English
Éditeur:
House & Home Media
Lire pluskeyboard_arrow_down
J'ACHÈTE CE NUMÉRO
6,29 $(TVA Incluse)
JE M'ABONNE
28,30 $(TVA Incluse)
12 Numéros

DANS CE NUMÉRO

access_time1 min.
explore our website at houseandhome.com

CELEBRITY STYLE High-end finishes and expansive floor-to-ceiling windows make the couple’s home a showstopper. LATEST HOME TOUR NEW H&H TV EPISODES See how designer Erika Floysvik transformed this dated family home into a functional space with a modern edge. MUST-TRY RECIPES HGTV star Joanna Gaines shares her recipe for Peach Caprese from her debut cookbook, Magnolia Table. DIY ARCHIVES Find our top summer DIYs that you can do in a weekend. DECORATING & DESIGN Be inspired by 15 beautiful cottages. Apple, the Apple logo, and iMac are trademarks of Apple Inc., registered in the U.S. and other countries. Photography courtesy of Sotheby’s International Realty (Tom and Gisele’s apartment)/Gisele Bündchen (Tom and Gisele’s portrait)/Joanna Gaines (salad)/by Jason Stickley (kitchen)/Angus Fergusson (DIY)/Virginia Macdonald (cottage)…

access_time2 min.
small world

My first house was a 760-square-foot bungalow. It wasn’t the first small space I ever lived in — that dubious “honour” goes to a one-room basement apartment in the late ’90s — but it was the first I could truly call my own. Given the tight footprint, I tried to do everything right: keep the palette light to let the eye travel, choose furniture of an appropriate scale, don’t put too much stuff on display… you know the rules. I was playing it safe and the house showed it, never really reflecting my taste or the things I loved. Fast-forward 15 years and the rules have been flipped over and turned inside out, as you’ll see on page 54. Today, those who call small spaces home have written their own —…

access_time1 min.
contributors

ASHLEY CAPP Photographer, “Above & Beyond” (page 38) Based in Toronto, Ashley captures mouth-watering food in-studio and distinctive interiors on location. Smallest space you lived in? A 750-square-foot condo. I loved not having any stairs and always knowing where my toddler was. Favourite organizing trick? I use the KonMari method for folding clothing and linens. It keeps things compact and allows you to see everything at a glance. CHANTAL BRAGANZA Writer, “It’s All Relative” (page 70) Chantal writes about culture, food and design for The Globe and Mail, Toronto Life and others. What did you love most about living in a small space? It forced me to be very judicious about what I brought into my place. Best tip for living small? Don’t trade too much leisure space for storage. You can own…

access_time4 min.
your letters

What a perfect cover on the June issue to coincide with Beth Hitchcock’s “Counting Costs” editor’s letter. Most readers could never afford the furniture, artwork and accessories shown in homes featured in H&H. Instead, we use them as inspiration for color schemes, layouts, kitchen design, etcetera. However, the fresh, inviting outdoor space on the cover is something anyone could duplicate — even on the most modest budget. Thank you for producing such a wonderful magazine month after month. — SHIRLEY WHITEHURST I just received the June issue, and I can’t help but comment on one of the “Style Files” items: a towel bar for $182 (“Insider Tips”)! Instead, I think I’ll use my money to buy almost eight years of House & Home subscriptions. — JUDITH MARQUAND I love the look of the freestanding…

access_time2 min.
grand openings

WILLIAM ASHLEY Entertaining has undergone a style shift — formal dinners and table settings have made way for a more modern, fuss-free style of hosting. Luckily for shoppers, 71-year-old homewares destination William Ashley has changed, too. Its new flagship in Toronto offers the same comprehensive collections and expert advice the company is known for but reads refreshingly contemporary. The design comes courtesy of principal Matt Davis of DesignAgency, the firm behind Toronto’s hip SoHo House and The Broadview Hotel. Arched windows and white walls give the 15,000-square-foot store an airy vibe, while a tea and coffee lounge means picking out china or that perfect housewarming gift is a relaxed experience. CASPER SLEEP SHOP Buying a mattress is actually fun now that Casper is opening stores across Canada. In 2014, the e-tailer disrupted the…

access_time1 min.
change agents

“I like the meticulous detail required to make the most of limited space. You have to think harder, and I like cleverness. I like efficiency”— GEORGE YABU, DESIGNER “How do we make 150 square feet feel spacious, fun and interesting?” This question, common to condo owners everywhere, was the starting point for George Yabu (left) and Glenn Pushelberg’s thoughtful design for the new Moxy microhotel in Times Square, New York. Surprisingly, the answer came, in part, from an 18th-century innovation. The Toronto designers’ version of a wooden Shaker peg rail is mounted to guest room walls as a place to store folding furniture, so visitors can customize their space. “If you want to use the furniture, you take it off the wall and open it up,” says Glenn. Otherwise, adds George,…

help