Voyages et Plein air
Our State: Celebrating North Carolina

Our State: Celebrating North Carolina November 2019

Through compelling narrative stories and jaw-dropping photography, Our State magazine celebrates everything that makes our state great! Each month, we reflect the beauty of North Carolina, tell the stories of its amazing people and its remarkable history, and suggest wonderful places to visit. We are unabashedly in love with the Tar Heel State, and every page is designed to be an inspiring tribute to where we live.

Pays:
United States
Langue:
English
Éditeur:
Mann Media
Fréquence:
Monthly
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3 min.
a view from the table

From my seat at the Thanksgiving table — a card table set up in the living room for us kids and covered with a harvest gold, paper tablecloth — I can see my grandmother’s Pilgrim salt-and-pepper shakers, a once-a-year switch from her Depression-glass Anchor Hocking ones, on the kitchen table, where the food is laid out, buffet-style. I can see the turkey, a 24-pound whopper, perfectly cooked and sliced with her electric knife on the sterling silver platter that she let me polish with Wright’s silver cream. I see two sheet pans full of dressing, cut into squares. Bowls piled with mashed potatoes, squash casserole, green beans. There’s a pottery stoneware pitcher of sweet tea — if I look at the bottom, I know I’ll see a “Jugtown” stamp —…

2 min.
stuck on’cue

1 The North Carolina Barbecue Society was established in 2006 to promote one of our favorite foods. Headquartered in Winston-Salem, this organization created what guide to notable barbecue restaurants in our state? A. Historic Barbecue Trail B. North Carolina Barbecue Atlas C. Barbecue Almanac 2 Politics and barbecue go hand in hand here. Mallard Creek Presbyterian Church’s annual barbecue, which began in 1929, allows political candidates to meet voters on the fourth Thursday in October. The church and event are located on Mallard Creek Road near what city? A. Asheville B. Charlotte C. Hendersonville 3 The part of the state where barbecue is served often determines what type of sauce is used. Eastern-style sauce includes vinegar and pepper, while Lexington-style sauce is flavored with what ingredient? A. Mustard B. Texas Pete C. Ketchup 4 Eastern and Lexington styles also differ when it…

2 min.
a rural wonderland

I LOVED SEEING Clay and Lisa Sykes’s barn on your September cover (“Through the Looking Glass,” page 108). We had the pleasure of staying there in the early phases of their remodel, and my family has always affectionately referred to it as “the cow farm.” We also had the pleasure of meeting and playing with Nick (the bull). This place was truly magical to us. Seeing the pictures and reading your beautiful article brought back wonderful memories and tears to my eyes. Julie Abrams Cumpata VIA FACEBOOK FISH CAMPS WANTED One thing I really miss about living in North Carolina is the fish camps (“Inland Catch,” September, page 45). Growing up in the Triad area, in a small town north of Greensboro, I had the pleasure of frequenting many different fish camps that were…

3 min.
graham

When Griffin McClure researched old advertisements for Green and McClure Furniture, he was surprised to learn that the store was once open until midnight on Saturdays. “The odd hours were built around accommodating the shift changes at the local textile mills,” he explains. A lot has changed since the store opened in 1907 — including the hours — but the business has remained a fixture in downtown Graham. In the years since he started sweeping floors as a teenager, McClure, the fourth-generation owner of Green and McClure, has witnessed the once-struggling downtown undergo a dramatic revitalization. “People are rediscovering city centers,” he says. “They want community and conversation, and that is bringing them back to downtown.” McClure is part of the team shaping the vision for downtown Graham. He hopes that investments…

2 min.
stony point waste not

WHY JOSEPH ALAN SMITH was nicknamed “Daddy Pete” is a question that even his great-grandson Alan Smith doesn’t know the answer to. But the name stuck to the 102-acre farm that Joseph bought in 1907 to raise beef cattle, and today, the historic Century Farm outside of Statesville is known as Daddy Pete Farms. Second-generation Sledge Smith began raising turkeys, and third-generation Gar Smith maintained the farm as well. In 1972, fourth-generation Alan Smith created a dairy farm on the property. Today, 700 Holstein cows occupy nearly 500 acres, and Alan’s son Joe — the fifth Daddy Pete generation — lives a stone’s throw from the milking barn, in his great-great-grandfather’s original clapboard farmhouse. A distinctive, familiar tang scents the air on Daddy Pete Farms. That’s because, no matter what else…

1 min.
high country hospitality

UNDER A LARGE PAVILION on the grounds of Grandfather Vineyard & Winery, a group of professors from Appalachian State University banters about news and politics. Since the tasting room opened in 2011, the self-proclaimed “ASU Renegades,” including around 20 current and retired professors, have met every Friday at this Banner Elk winery to “get a glass of wine and solve the world’s problems,” says marketing professor Ünal Boya. While they frequent Grandfather for its delicious wines, they’ve made it their designated hangout because they, like many customers, have formed a friendship with owners Steve and Sally Tatum. The Tatums were running an interior design firm and furniture showroom when they first planted grapes on five acres in 2003 and 2004. The goal was simply to make wine for themselves. But when…