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OUTOUT

OUT

November -December 2019

Sexy, smart, and sophisticated, it inspires readers with captivating feature stories, striking fashion layouts, and lively entertainment reviews. Get OUT digital magazine subscription today to discover what's in. Each issue is filled with interviews, fashion, travel, celebrities and more for gay life today.

Pays:
United States
Langue:
English
Éditeur:
Here Media
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J'ACHÈTE CE NUMÉRO
8,35 $(TVA Incluse)
JE M'ABONNE
20,83 $10,42 $(TVA Incluse)
6 Numéros

DANS CE NUMÉRO

1 min.
out

Phillip Picardi Editor in Chief Sean Santiago Art Director Raquel Willis Executive Editor Yashua Simmons Fashion Director EDITORIAL Tre’vell Anderson Entertainment and Culture Director Nico Lang Deputy Editor Mikelle Street Senior Editor Nicolas Bloise Visuals Editor Rose Dommu Senior Staff Writer Javy Rodriguez Social Editor Esther Gim, Jamie Staples Copy Editors Julian Mack Fashion Assistant CONTRIBUTORS Jacob Stead, Collier Schorr, Terry Tsiolis, Ryan Pfluger, Elliott Jerome Brown Jr., Quil Lemons, Tarana Burke, Ahmed Eldin, Adam Eli, ALOK, Matt Baume, Serena Sonoma, Mey Valdivia Rude, Kimberly Drew Stuart Brockington Assistant Vice President, Associate Publisher ADVERTISING Ezra Alvarez, Patty Aguayo, Michael Riggio Executive Directors, Integrated Sales Stewart Nacht Senior Director, Ad Operations Tiffany Kesden Manager, Ad Operations BRAND PARTNERSHIPS Jamie Tredwell Managing Director Michael Lombardo Design Director Eric James Associate Director Tim Snow Senior Manager Preston Souza Integrated Advertising and Brand Partnerships Associate Dean Fryn Integrated Advertising and Marketing Coordinator ONLINE Jocelyn Smith Director, Audience Growth and Analytics Christopher Harrity Interactive…

3 min.
the out 100

DEAR READER, THE OUT100 IS OUR MAGAZINE’S GREATEST and most well-known tradition: a prestigious compilation of the year’s most impactful and influential LGBTQ+ people. For quite some time, I’ve found it an absolute treasure trove of discovery—a mix of the celebrities we all know and call our own with the activists and community leaders who are pushing our agenda forward. This year, of course, is no different. You are holding one of six special covers we’ve produced, featuring a stunning roster of incredible talent. But, before we get to the many wonderful living folks who are doing incredible work, we must first honor those we’ve lost. That was the mission of The Trans Obituaries Project (p. 56), a stunning, multi-pronged feature reported on and authored by our executive editor, Raquel Willis. By press…

1 min.
contributors

ALOK Whether onstage or off, ALOK isn’t afraid to share no-holds-barred critiques of systems of oppression. It’s no wonder, then, that they ended up in front of our cover star Sam Smith about a year ago when the artist wanted to discuss their own journey with gender. “What I understand queerness to be is reclamatory power,” they say. “It’s insistence on saying these things that we have been taught are impossible are not.” JP BRAMMER The self-proclaimed “Picante Carrie Bradshaw,” JP Brammer gives readers the warm nudge they need to go after their dreams. In 2020, he will translate his Twitter-iconic signature voice into a memoir, Hola Papi: How to Come Out to Your Boyfriend in a Walmart Parking Lot and Other Life Lessons in Love, Race, and Sexuality. TOURMALINE No one carries the power…

9 min.
ronan farrow

Tarana Burke: I think your reputation precedes you now, right? Everybody knows that you don’t want Ronan Farrow getting in your business—it may not end well. And I hate to ask because I hate being asked, but, “Where do you get your courage?” Ronan Farrow: Well, you’re the one who should be asked. Where do you get your courage from? You have lived it, you have overcome it. You are passing on courage to others. For me, I hope that the book is a raw, honest, emotionally revealing testament to the fact that it’s not easy. For a lot of the sources who were embroiled in this international plot, and a lot of reporters who banged their heads against the wall trying to get the truth out, the same was true.…

2 min.
books of the year

ROBYN CRAWFORD A SONG FOR YOU: MY LIFE WITH WHITNEY HOUSTON (DUTTON) There’s been one person conveniently erased from Whitney Houston’s legacy—and, ironically, she may have been her “Greatest Love of All.” Years after Houston’s tragic passing, Robyn Crawford confidently steps out of the shadows (a place she’d allegedly been cast by the Houston clan), proudly revealing the relationship she shared with her best friend and lover. Rather than tarnishing her legacy in sensationalism, Crawford, with love, manages to honor it in a way nobody else ever could. OCEAN VUONG ON EARTH WE’RE BRIEFLY GORGEOUS (PENGUIN PRESS) Written by poet, fiction writer, and (as of this year) the recipient of the MacArthur “genius grant,” this tragically beautiful piece of literature is framed in part as a love letter from Vuong to his mother, a Vietnamese immigrant who…

10 min.
jeremy o. harris

KEKE PALMER HAD TO PEE. It was act two of the critically lauded and much-discussed Broadway production Slave Play, a two-hour intermission-less performance, and the multi-hyphenate star had to go to the bathroom. So, she did. Palmer stood up from her seat, crouched, raised a singular finger, and slowly started making her way down her row to the aisle. She quietly apologized along the way: “Sorry, sorry, sorry.” But the audience of around 800 Black folks in the John Golden Theatre on Sept. 18 understood the gesture; they knew the “church finger,” a hallmark of most Black Southern Baptist churches, now brought to Broadway. After all, they were there to witness Jeremy O. Harris’ Blackout. The inspiration for Blackout, a performance of Harris’ Slave Play viewed almost exclusively by Black showgoers (legally…