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Popular PhotographyPopular Photography

Popular Photography

March/April 2017

Popular Photography brings you step-by-step secrets of the pros for taking their most amazing shots. You’ll discover the best equipment at the best prices, get comprehensive comparative reports on cameras, lenses, film, digital equipment, printers, scanners, software, accessories and so much more. Get Popular Photography digital magazine subscription today.

Pays:
United States
Langue:
English
Éditeur:
Bonnier Corporation
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DANS CE NUMÉRO

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in praise of craft

The word has fallen out of favor. Craft. It sounds dusty and old-fashioned—corny, even. As for the practice itself, in a world that measures the importance of an image by shares and likes, where pictures are created to be consumed and then forgotten, why bother? Yet, craft is something this magazine celebrates and encourages in every issue. We look for photographers whose work exemplifies it. We ply them with questions to reveal their techniques. And we explain the tools you might need in your own photographic practice. You can see the results throughout this issue, though you may think some of the photographers we profile a little mad in their pursuit of craft. Take Ingo Arndt, who traveled the globe capturing exquisite photographs of something most people take for granted: grass (“The…

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head space

Sunshine State native Clarissa Bonet was in for a shock when she moved to Chicago to get her MFA in Photography: Her customary tropical surroundings were replaced with cold concrete, steel, and glass. This photograph, titled “Mixed Use,” is from her ongoing series City Space, a project that was born out of Bonet’s sentiments about her new home. Feeling at once attracted to and overwhelmed by the towering built environment of downtown Chicago, she began using her own experiences of the city as templates for elaborately staged images. Bonet casts models, chooses their wardrobes, and meticulously plans each photo, scouting locations in the city and taking note of the best time of day to shoot. “My favorite thing about this image,” Bonet relates, “is the disorienting effect that is created…

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top tools

THE HOTTEST NEW STUFF AND THE TECH TRENDS BEHIND IT Cine Shooter PANASONIC LUMIX GH5 The latest Micro Four Thirds ILC should be equally attractive to video and still shooters. Its weather-sealed body contains a stabilized sensor that pumps out 20.3MP stills at 9 frames per second with the benefit of continuous autofocus. It shoots 4K at 60p and FullHD (1080p) video at 180 fps. Still shooters get improved focus tracking, with 225 AF points. $2,000, body only, street; panasonic.com Fast Glass MEYER OPTIK NOCTURNUS 50MM F/0.95 II Just like glass that made Meyer’s name in the early 20th century, this super-fast prime is handmade in Germany—and priced to match. Fully manual and clad in an all-metal housing, its 10-element, 7-group optics focus to 1.6 feet, and its uncommonly large f/0.95 aperture lets light pour in.…

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sweet 17

IT’S BEEN six years since Epson wowed photographers with its Stylus Pro 4900 professional inkjet printer. Now a successor has finally arrived. The new SureColor P5000 ($1,795, street), like its predecessor, accepts 17-inch roll media or cut-sheet paper up to 17x22 inches—and uniquely among Epsons in this price range, it can accept sheet media both front-in and front-out. Its fairly compact size lets it fit in a home office or small studio, putting lab-quality prints within reach of those who lack the space or budget for larger printers. But the P5000 is more than just an incremental update. Shifting to Epson’s SureColor family, it brings with the new name a new inkset: The latest UltraChrome HDX set comprises 10 colors, including four blacks—photo, matte, light and light light—along with orange and…

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glass appeal

EXPECTING A handsome tax refund? It may be time to consider picking up some of the latest glass for your kit—especially if you’ve gotten a new camera recently. These lenses sport high-tech optics, with low and anomalous partial dispersion elements to enhance image rendition, and some even boast hot-ticket features such as de-clickable apertures for video. In step with recent trends, most of those listed here are wideangle or short telephoto primes. 1 Canon EF-M 18–150mm f/3.5–6.3 IS STM $500 This new lightweight zoom for Canon’s line of mirrorless ILCs—it was designed specifically for the M5—comes in two colors for style-conscious shooters. HOT: Its image stabilization, touted as delivering an extra 4 stops of handheld shooting, works in tandem with the M5 body to boost steadiness when used without a tripod. NOT:…

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spring shows

WATER’S EDGE CALEB CHARLAND, INVERSIONS Gallery Kayafas, Boston APRIL 14–MAY 20 These prints may remind you at first of Hiroshi Sugimoto’s seascapes, but they demonstrate an entirely different approach to capturing the nature of water and light. Maine-native Charland photographs the surface of a pond in his home state and prints his negatives on half a sheet of darkroom paper. After developing the bottom of the image, Charland folds the photo paper in half and exposes it to light, creating a negative image on the top; the result is clever illusion that blends craft and concept. Coming Soon CONTEXT Filter Space, Chicago MARCH 3–APRIL 22 A group show exhibiting works from more than a dozen artists, this is the result of the Chicago photography nonprofit Filter Space’s yearly spring call for submissions. Photographs are…

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