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category_outlined / Photographie
Popular PhotographyPopular Photography

Popular Photography January 2017

Popular Photography brings you step-by-step secrets of the pros for taking their most amazing shots. You’ll discover the best equipment at the best prices, get comprehensive comparative reports on cameras, lenses, film, digital equipment, printers, scanners, software, accessories and so much more. Get Popular Photography digital magazine subscription today.

Pays:
United States
Langue:
English
Éditeur:
Bonnier Corporation
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DANS CE NUMÉRO

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making it new

Inside, the contrast seems even starker as you glimpse into the data-driven future of imaging technology in a profile of “The Camera Man” (page 76). But in the hands of talented contemporary photographers such as the three in “Tin Works” (page 68), tintype has found new life. Particularly startling in its ambition is the work of Ian Ruhter, who travels in a truck outfitted with a huge homemade camera and chemicals to make wet-plate photos of the landscape. Tintype isn’t the only antique process to find a vital place in today’s photographic scene. I recently judged the annual Alternative Process Competition of the Soho Photo Gallery, a nonprofit collective in New York. Curating the exhibit I discovered a trove of wonderful new work employing media such as gum bichromate, cyanotype, and palladium.…

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lost in space

In her series Here Nor There, San Francisco– based product and apparel photographer Cera Hensley builds imaginary landscapes in miniature, about 3x3 feet. She photographs her imaginary places, then photographs real people to interact with them. The composite is a disorienting investigation of space and scale with an emotionladen narrative pull. “With my camera on a tripod facing what appears to be nothing more than a mess up on the table—baby powder, neutral-density gel, blue paper, and a translucent light disc,” she writes, “I look through the camera, which beholds the landscape I had envisioned.”…

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our picks

Tough Tele ZEISS MILVUS 135MM F/2 A classic telephoto prime in Canon and Nikon DSLR mounts, this new Zeiss opens up to a fast f/2 aperture for low-light shooting and shallow depth of field. Based on a 1930s design to reduce glare, its Apo-Sonnar optical formula—11 elements in eight groups—includes four elements to fight color fringing. All-metal housing and seals against dust and moisture should ensure that the lens will stand up to abuse in the field. $2,199, street; zeiss.com BUILT TO LAST Wider Tilt-Shift NIKON 19MM F/4E ED PC NIKKOR Architectural and landscape photographers will appreciate this wide-angle perspective-control lens. Permitting precise tilt and shift movements, it lets you eliminate keystone distortion when shooting buildings up close and maximize (and minimize) depth of field throughout the frame. It’s Nikon’s widest-angle tilt-shift lens. $3,397, street; nikonusa.com SOFT…

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f.y.i

LEICA AND ONA partnered to create 19 new camera bags inspired by the German cameramaker’s designs. Ranging from $168 to $496, street, they are made from fullgrain leather and waxed canvas. With solid brass hardware. ADOBE unveiled a new Sky Replace tool for its Creative Cloud suite of editing software. It can automatically identify an overexposed sky in a digital image and replace it with one from a preselected library. As of press time, the tool had not yet been added. LOUPEDECK, a specialized console for editing in Adobe Photoshop Lightroom, replaces your keyboard with an interface of knobs and sliders. Funded through Indiegogo, the device is slated to start shipping to backers this summer. THE LOWDOWN GoPro, citing safety reasons, recalled 2,500 of its longawaited Karma quadcopters because a small number of the drones…

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sky eye

DESIGNED TO ATTRACT first-time drone pilots, Yuneec’s latest quadcopter, the Breeze 4K, is simple to use yet delivers impressive image quality from its diminutive on-board camera. It provides a 117-degree field of view, and its integrated 1/3.06-inch CMOS sensor churns out 4K (Ultra HD) video footage and snaps 13MP JPEG stills. At $500 street, the Breeze 4K is one of the least expensive drones for UHD video, thanks in part to its lack of a dedicated controller. Instead, you pilot it using an app for Android and iOS devices and a Wi-Fi connection. The drone itself has few frills— just a lightweight white plastic body with a power button and a micro-USB port. It comes to life with the Breeze Cam app: We found the iOS version thoughtfully designed, with intuitive…

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theater in the round

1 LG 360 Cam $200 This tiny device sports an ultra-wide-angle lens on each side, each with a 200-degree field of view, to produce spherical panoramic JPEGs and 2K 360-degree videos. HOT: It’s easy on the wallet while still providing true spherical capability. Unlike some, this camera has a microSD port. NOT: With a lightweight plastic housing, this camera isn’t designed to stand up to heavy use. 2 Ricoh Theta SC $297 A variation on the pathbreaking Ricoh Theta S, this latest twin-sensor camera sheds some features to shave $50 off the price. HOT: It weighs 23 grams (0.81 oz.) less than the Theta S. Its new smartphone app is designed to be more intuitive and easier to use than the app for its older sibling. NOT: The video recording limit has been…

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