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category_outlined / Photographie
Popular PhotographyPopular Photography

Popular Photography May 2014

Popular Photography brings you step-by-step secrets of the pros for taking their most amazing shots. You’ll discover the best equipment at the best prices, get comprehensive comparative reports on cameras, lenses, film, digital equipment, printers, scanners, software, accessories and so much more. Get Popular Photography digital magazine subscription today.

Pays:
United States
Langue:
English
Éditeur:
Bonnier Corporation
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features

57 5 SUPER PHOTO PROJECTSThis how-to extravaganza provides practically everything you need to know to produce great action-stopping, time-lapse, pinhole, paint-with-light, and DIY photo booth projects. Can't decide which to try? Go for broke and do all five!By the Editors of Popular Photography 50 STORM CATCHERHow one photographer couples the artistry of a monochrome master with the courage of a daredevil weather chaser. The result? A portfolio that both fine art and meteorological fans can embrace.Photos by Mitch Dobrowner; text by Jon Blistein 68 ANATOMY OF A STUDIO SHOOTHow many professionals does it take to pull off a single—and fairly simple—fashion shoot? We visit the studio of a very busy clothing website to find out. The answer may surprise readers!By Matthew Ismael Ruiz Next 13 WE WANT THIS The Nikon D4s delivers the highest…

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little bits of advice

At this magazine, we have a term for our own tendency to try to tell you everything you need to know about every aspect of photography: “The Pop Photo Answer.” Read this month's Tech Talk (page 30) on how flash is measured for The Pop Photo Answer at its best. But while our annual Big How-To Issue always seems to show us at our most encyclopedic, this year the editors decided to focus on just a handful of really cool photo projects that any photographer can do—and everyone should try at least once. You'll find a few of these in our HOW section and more in the feature on page 57. (Just forgive us for the cover featuring a photographic technique, X-ray, that you may never be able to do. You…

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nikon d4s

FOR THE first update to its venerable flagship, the D4, Nikon chose to refine rather than reinvent, pushing the camera's limits in sensitivity and speed. Nikon says the D4s' newly developed sensor, a 16.2MP full-frame CMOS imager, improves on the D4's dynamic range; the expanded sensitivity now reaches an astonishing ISO 409,600. The battery life is improved, lasting up to about 3020 shots versus the D4's 2600, and Nikon modified the mirror mechanism to reduce vibrations from mirror slap. The new EXPEED4 processor can churn out 200 continuous shots (with autoexposure and autofocus) at a blazing 11 frames per second, up from the D4's 10 fps. But Nikon didn't fix what wasn't broken: The 91,000-pixel RGB 3D Color Matrix Metering and 51-point AF system from the D4 remain untouched. 16.2MP fullframe sensor 11-fps bursts CF…

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4k foray

PANASONIC'S GH line of Micro Four Thirds cameras have been video-focused ever since the runaway success of the Lumix GH2. Its newest model, the GH4, takes it to the next level—it's the first ILC to capture 4K video The 16.05MP Live MOS sensor and Venus Engine IX processor can capture video in QuadHD (3840x2160p30) or Cinema 4K (4096x2160p24) at bit rates up to 100Mbps. With regular HD (1920x1080p60), the bit rate can reach as high as 200Mbps. A 10-bit video stream can be output via the HDMI 1.4a to an external monitor or recorder. Panasonic also introduced a slew of accessories, including a flash, shotgun mic, and the DMW-YAGH Interface unit ($1,998, street), which sports two XLR inputs, four SDI ports, and a 12V DC power source for use with professional video…

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killer compact

SIGMA'S FOVEON sensor has always been a little, well, different, with its multi-layered structure (see Inside Tech, at right) and high nominal pixel counts. And the company's newest camera model with the APS-C-sized Foveon X3 inside, the dp2 Quattro, fits the bill. Thinner and longer than its predecessors in the Merrill line, the Quattro has a new Foveon that Sigma says out-resolves the old one by 30 percent. The first of three planned models, the dp2 sports a fixed 30mm (45mm full-frame equivalent) f/2.8 lens. It has a 9-point AF system, and the leaf shutter allows for flash sync at all shutter speeds. The camera is due in stores this summer. Sigma dp2 Quattro Price to be announced sigma-global.com…

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new convert

WE LOVE lens adapters—anything that gives old glass new life is OK in our book. The Fotodiox Pro Vizelex ND Throttle adapter will let you mount your Canon EF or EF-S glass on a Sony E-mount ILC camera such as the Alpha 6000, and keep infinity focus. Here's the twist: Its blue ring houses a variable neutral-density filter, letting you control the amount of light that reaches the sensor without affecting color or depth of field. The catch? With no electronic contacts, the adapter loses you autofocus and automatic diaphragm control, and you will have to set your aperture before mounting it. So it's best-suited for video use, where shooters prefer manual focus and apertures remain constant throughout a clip. The adapter is made of brass with a stainless-steel finish and comes…

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