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Retro GamerRetro Gamer

Retro Gamer No. 200

Retro Gamer is the only magazine in the UK that’s fully dedicated to the halcyon days of classic gaming. If you’ve ever fondly blasted away at the Bydo Empire in R-Type, swung Bowser by the tail in Super Mario 64, or navigated all 20 levels of Matthew Smith’s Manic Miner, then this is the magazine for you. Created by a dedicated team of experts, Retro Gamer’s mission is to deliver constantly engaging and passionately written articles that cover a wide range of subjects. We offer our readership in-depth looks at classic games and franchises, behind-the-scenes glimpses of the software houses from yesteryear, and one-on-one exclusive interviews with industry veterans such as Archer Maclean and Hideo Kojima. Stylish, entertaining and beautifully presented, Retro Gamer is the ultimate guide to videogaming’s rich and diverse history.

Pays:
United Kingdom
Langue:
English
Éditeur:
Future Publishing Ltd
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2 min.
the retrobates

DARRAN JONES I’d love to choose multiples, but my favourite cover is the Ultimate: Play The Game loading screens from issue 109. In fact, I love it so much it hangs in my gaming shed. Expertise: Juggling a gorgeous wife, two beautiful girls and an award-winning magazine Currently playing: Star Wars Pinball Favourite game of all time: Strider DREW SLEEP This one! I mean just look at it, Nick’s anime villain glasses, Darran’s frozen ‘everything is fine’ smile and Gary nailed my floppy hair of a 14-year-old. I like to think Andy is the surveillance camera, yelling at us that PC games are better than consoles. Expertise: Surviving landmark RG issues (that’s two now!) Currently Playing: Celeste Favourite game of all time: Final Fantasy VIII NICK THORPE For sentimental reasons, it’s my first Sonic cover – issue 158,…

1 min.
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So here we are, we have hit the big 200, and I still can’t quite believe it. It’s a landmark achievement for any magazine, so we wanted to do something memorable for this particular issue, beyond giving you a cool Turrican CD, and a double-sided poster with Gary Lucken’s cover art and Craig Stevenson’s excellent map detail for the forthcoming game, Melkhior’s Mansion. So for one month only, join us as we journey through the history of videogames, from their embryonic beginnings with Spacewar! to today’s interest in retro and the excitement that VR offers. We’ve taken this special opportunity to split the magazine into decades, from the Sixties to today, with the aim of covering interesting stories that have happened within those eras: from Atari’s rise to dominance in the…

5 min.
intellivision levels up

There’s been a lot of noise about the return of Intellivision, and you largely have Tommy Tallarico to thank for that. The renowned musician and creator of Video Games Live is behind the exciting new project that promises a return to the classic games of old and he was only too keen to give us a little more insight as to what we can expect when the Amico console launches in October 2020. How will the Amico stand out from other systems? One of the biggest differences is that the focus of the console is based around couch co-op and the ability of people with all skill levels to be able to play the system and compete against one another. There hasn’t been a system like this since the Nintendo Wii over…

2 min.
you took your time!

played Tetris for the first time last week. A few weeks ago, I bought a Game Boy for the hell of it and grabbed a load of original games. I saw Tetris on the list and realised I’d never actually played it, so I took a punt. I’m aware that’s an amazing statement. A 46-year-old gamer had never actually played possibly the biggest-selling game of all time. I tweeted it and most people thought I was joking, and while most took the comment good-naturedly, a few got very angry. How unlike Twitter. But the truth is that it never appealed to me at the time. It was absolutely everywhere and I thought it looked a bit dull. I seem to not like stuff that other people really like, and I don’t know…

2 min.
console yourself

I don’t know if you’ve seen, but as I write this there have been artists’ impressions of the PlayStation 5 floating around. It looks distinctly sci-fi – like a building from Blade Runner’s version of 2019 Los Angeles, or a particularly esoteric UFO. We’ve seen these mock-ups before – remember when the Xbox was going to be in the shape of a massive X? And then it came out and it lived up more to the ‘box’ part of its name than the X-part. “The PlayStation was minimalist … there was beauty in its subtle lines” It’s that aesthetic that we’ve sort of had to endure ever since, as far as new consoles go. They’re all just boxes, black slabs, featureless and designed to disappear into the shadows beneath your TV. Even the Switch…

5 min.
talking turrican

Musician Chris Huelsbeck has one of the most extensive CVs in games, stretching over 30 years across more than 80 releases, from Great Giana Sisters and Tunnel B1 to the Star Wars: Rogue Squadron series. Possibly his most well-known game works, however, are the tracks he created for the Turrican series, as heard in remixed form on this issue’s Turrican Ultimate Collection CD. Here, he talks us through each track, starting with stirring orchestral treatments and segueing to some more traditional synth-led arrangements. 1. The Final Fight “This version uses the full potential of a symphonic orchestra”Chris Huelsbeck This was the penultimate title theme for me and the series. It was also a showcase of my TFMX 7 voice system on the Amiga, breaking free from the usual four-voice limitation. This concept, based on…