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category_outlined / Culture et Littérature
Wild WestWild West

Wild West August 2018

Wild West Magazine presents the great American frontier from its beginnings to today. America’s western frontier has been a vital part of the country’s myths and reality, from the earliest exploration beyond the territory of the first colonies, to the wide expanses of the western prairies and deserts. Experience the old west and cowboys and Indians from top historical writers. Wild West brings to life the fascinating history, lore and culture of the great American frontier.

Pays:
United States
Langue:
English
Éditeur:
HistoryNet
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mystery murder

One of the most memorable stretches of road I’ve ever driven (one I drove two or three times a month for a year in the mid-1980s) is U.S. 70 in New Mexico between Las Cruces and Alamogordo. From Las Cruces the road climbs into the foothills of the scenic Organ Mountains, threads through San Agustín Pass, descends into the Tularosa Basin and heads straight and true (hopefully like the projectiles from nearby White Sands Missile Range, the testing of which can close down the highway) past White Sands National Monument and Holloman Air Force Base before bending north into Alamogordo (which means “fat cottonwood”). Aside from the modern military installation, the scenery always took me back in time—sometimes to the very creation of the glistening, wavelike white sands of the…

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letters

BILLY PULPIT I am the owner of the tintype [above] that appears with the “Another Billy?” item on P. 11 of Roundup in the April issue. I am an attorney with 31 years’ worth of federal and state trial experience. One of my hobbies is collecting photographic equipment and photographs, which led me to purchase a group of five photos that included this one. Once I recognized Pat Garrett [at far right], I was drawn to the younger man [second from left] with a large Adam’s apple and sweater. I took this matter as seriously as any case I ever handled. After extensive research and consultations with experts (too many to be detailed here), I identify him as Billy the Kid. Pat Garrett’s signature is on the tintype [on his lapel; not…

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9 flash points in the civil war southwest

1 Battle of Glorieta Pass (March 26–28, 1862): Determined “Pikes Peakers” from Colorado Territory ended Brig. Gen. Henry Hopkins Sibley’s grand plans for a Confederate empire in the Southwest. Given the Texan retreat, Glorieta is justly regarded as the “Gettysburg of the West.” 2 Battle of Valverde (Feb. 20–21, 1862): In the largest and bloodiest Civil War battle in the Rocky Mountain West, General Sibley’s Rebel army drove the Federals from the field, opening the road to Albuquerque and Santa Fe. 3 First Battle of Adobe Walls (Nov. 25, 1864): In the largest Army-Indian confrontation in Texas history more than 1,000 Comanches and Kiowas in the Texas Panhandle engaged Colonel Christopher “Kit” Carson’s force of 335 cavalrymen and soldiers and 75 Ute and Jicarilla Apache scouts in a close fight that, were…

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see you later…

David Dary David A. Dary, 83, an award-winning author of more than 20 books, died on March 15, 2018. Born on Aug. 21, 1934, in Manhattan, Kan., Dary was a broadcast journalist and journalism professor before retiring to write full-time in 2000. His 1981 book Cowboy Culture won a Wrangler Award from the National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum and a Spur Award from Western Writers of America (WWA). Overall Dary received two Wranglers and two Spurs, as well as WWA’s Owen Wister Award for lifetime achievement in Western literature. His other books include Seeking Pleasure in the Old West (1995), Red Blood and Black Ink: Journalism in the Old West (1998) and Frontier Medicine (2008). FROM LEFT: LAZELLE JONES, WIKIPEDIA, CURTIS FORD, KANSAS STATE UNIVERSITY…

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events of the west

Tombstone Freedom Days Crew members and actors from the hit 1993 Western Tombstone will hold a 25th reunion during Freedom Days in Tombstone, Ariz., June 29–July 1. Expected to attend the Lions Club–sponsored event are Michael Biehn (who portrayed Johnny Ringo), Buck Taylor (“Turkey Creek” Jack Johnson), Peter Sherayko (“Texas Jack” Vermillion), Frank Stallone (Ed Bailey) and Catherine Hardwicke (production designer). Tombstone will also host an annual salute to buffalo soldiers, commemorating Medal of Honor recipients from the era. On hand will be Vietnam-era MOH recipients Melvin Morris and Drew Dix, as well as political commentator Allen West, a retired U.S. Army lieutenant colonel and former congressman. Call 520-678-1824 or email larianmotel@gmail.com. The Reel West The Eiteljorg Museum in Indianapolis looks at how Western films and TV shows have shaped our ideas of…

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tracking the truly wild west

Since the Pleistocene epoch, when steppe lions, long-legged hyenas, dire wolves and various long-toothed cats preyed on such megafauna as giant sloths, mammoths and a massive species of buffalo known as Bison antiquus, the Great Plains have nurtured a plethora of wildlife. Those animals in turn drew human hunters, who followed and harvested the herds for their own sustenance. Author Dan Flores has also tracked the animals across the region, studying and sharing their stories in articles, lectures and books. His passion for the natural history of the Plains has informed us about the region and made clear that both environmental factors and human interactions have shaped the region. His 2016 book American Serengeti: The Last Big Animals of the Great Plains earned Flores many honors, including a Wrangler Award…

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