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category_outlined / Science
WIREDWIRED

WIRED September 2017

The Wired mission is to tell the world something they've never heard before in a way they've never seen before. It's about turning new ideas into everyday reality. It's about seeding our community of influencers with the ideas that will shape and transform our collective future. Wired readers want to know how technology is changing the world, and they're interested in big, relevant ideas, even if those ideas challenge their assumptions—or blow their minds.

Pays:
United States
Langue:
English
Éditeur:
Conde Nast US
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access_time2 min.
stress test

Zohar Lazar ditched his paintbrushes for an iPad.ILLUSTRATOR Zohar Lazar expected that depicting the anxieties of our tech-addled lives (“The Great Tech Panic,” page 54) would be a lighthearted, even comic process. Then came the tide of dread. See, Lazar recently put aside his paints and began working exclusively on an iPad. “Now I’m completely dependent on this one device,” he says. “I’ve got all these massive files—what if I lose them? If my iPad konks out I’m up shit creek.” Lazar, a frequent WIRED contributor, set about pouring his fears into an everyman character who represents all of us, fretful about a new world that we’re still learning how to navigate.Shot for wired, Mark Zuckerberg Nike CEO Mark Parkerand the Silicon Valley cast.Return of the Nerd(s)Back when uber was…

access_time2 min.
dark times

THEY’RE IN THE NEWS. They’re in our elections. Russian hackers have even invaded critical infrastructure that keeps the heat on and the lights burning, as senior writer Andy Greenberg reported in July (“Lights Out”). And while two power-grid hacks in Ukraine don’t explicitly threaten the United States, they absolutely represent a new, all-digital way to wage war on any nation. Of course, the US is already grappling with plenty of other challenges: Lauren Smiley’s story about the killing of an Indian tech worker in Olathe, Kansas, (“Murder in the Heartland”) brought readers to tears. In both cases, our best shot at facing these dangers is to understand them.@WIRED / MAIL@WIRED.COMRe: “Lights Out”: Russian hackers take aim at infrastructure “A POWER-GRID HACK COULD KNOCK OUT YOUR NETFLIX AND HULU, SO PAY…

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out of this world

(GROOMING BY HEATHER CRUCE/LA’BELLA MAFIA AGENCY)BBEFORE HE ROCKETED off to spend a year in space, one of Scott Kelly’s final acts on Earth was peeing on the back tire of a van. Not because you can’t pee in space (you can—it just requires some suction). It’s tradition: Yuri Gagarin, who made it to space first, did the same thing. In Kelly’s new book, Endurance, the veteran astronaut writes about that and all the other weird practices and rituals and anxieties and safety checks and responsibilities and more safety checks that go into preparing for, and then spending, a chunk of your life in perpetual free fall. The main takeaway: It’s hard. Coffee comes in plastic bags. Space smells funny. There’s never enough chocolate pudding. But these pesky truths, along with…

access_time1 min.
c-suite gigs

WHAT DO WE WANT? C-level jobs! When do we want them? As soon as we acquire the necessary job skills, meet the right people, and find a company with appropriate pathways for growth! Here’s what the Chief Something Officer planetary system looks like, based on data from job-search site Glassdoor and student-services firm Chegg (where I have my day job). Turns out, CEOs share many of their top 10 skills with many other roles, making it perhaps easier to wriggle up to that post, while chief compliance officers are largely single-skill sharers. And if salary is important to you, chief medical officer is the way to go. Too bad you’ll probably need another degree for that.METHODOLOGY: BASED ON THE TOP 10 SKILLS ASSOCIATED WITH EACH ROLE, AS DETERMINED BY CHEGG.…

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game changer

(ILLUSTRATIONS BY SAM MILLER)WHO:Marie Lu, YA sci-fi writerFAVORITE GAME:Journey. “It’s this sweeping ode to the vast unknown. I played it through twice and cried both times.”GUILTY PLEASURE:Assassin’s Creed: Brotherhood. “It’s so deliciously fun. I love the Renaissance Italy open world.”IDOL:Brian Jacques, the Redwall series. “I worshipped his work as a kid.”MODERN HERO:Sabaa Tahir, An Ember in the Ashes series. “Everything good fantasy should be: cinematic and epic.”SCI-FI AUTHOR MARIE LU sets her trilogies in shadowy realms, from a militarized police state (Legend) to a hunted secret society (The Young Elites). But as a former videogame designer for Disney Interactive Studios, Lu was conjuring up dark, fantastical worlds long before her books became best sellers. In Warcross, out this month, Lu embraces her gamer roots. ¶ The novel is set in…

access_time2 min.
brick høuse denmark’s lego landmark

IN THE QUAINT town of Billund, Denmark, 30 teens have the ultimate after-school job: disassembling the thousands of creations that will be built each day by visitors to the Lego House, opening September 28. (Hear that? It’s the clattering of 25 million Legos under one roof.) Designed by hotshot Danish architect Bjarke Ingels, the 40,000-squarefoot playscape features zones where Lego-loving kids and their equally enthralled parents can dig into a block-filled pool, direct a stop-motion movie, and launch toy cars off a ramp. Visitors can tag photos of their handiwork via RFID wristbands and view them later in the Lego House app. But though the mod museum is tricked out with tech, brickheads will find plenty of tributes to the classic plastic piece. That includes a gallery of masterworks submitted…

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