EXPLOREMY LIBRARY
Home & Garden
5280 Home

5280 Home August/September 2019

For more than a decade, 5280 has highlighted Denver and Colorado architecture, interior design, and home products in its pages. With 5280 Home, our mission is to deliver a shelter magazine that showcases the unique visual style and aesthetic of the Front Range in a sophisticated, yet accessible, manner. We will bring you inside the most beautiful houses in and around the Mile High City—and show you how to execute these looks in your own home. We'll talk to the most in-demand local designers. And we'll spotlight the hippest home goods out there. 5280 Home is a must-read for homeowners, designers, and anyone who has an eye for what's next in Denver decor.

Country:
United States
Language:
English
Publisher:
5280 Publishing, Inc
Frequency:
Bimonthly
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6 Issues

in this issue

1 min.
personal space

WHEN I FIRST READ ABOUT THE 1970s fixer-upper remodeled by Paralympic silver medalist Amy Purdy and her husband, Daniel Gale, I thought about something I believe is true: A home is a three-dimensional reflection of its owners’ personalities and passions. Purdy—whose legs were amputated below the knees after her near-fatal fight with meningococcal meningitis at age 19—is a top-ranked adaptive snowboarder, and an author, inspirational speaker, model, and Dancing with the Stars runner-up. So it’s no surprise that the story of her Silverthorne home (page 74) illustrates her ability to see the potential in a project that, for others, would have posed too many challenges. With ingenuity, elbow grease, help from professionals, and determination, Prudy and Gale created a sanctuary among the aspens. This issue is full of interiors that tell…

2 min.
q what’s your favorite local source of design inspiration?

Natalie Warady STYLIST A seasoned photo stylist, Natalie Warady knows a house is more than just a building; it’s the backdrop to people’s lives. “My aim when styling [a home] is to embrace the family’s history,” she says. So she was delighted to discover photos and memorabilia from the homeowners’ family integrated into the rooms featured in “Home Made” (page 60). That love of detail also informs her current go-to source of inspiration: Animal Handmade, “whose [locally made] handbag designs remind me of modern [riffs on] Egyptian hieroglyphics,” Warady says. Julie Dugdale WRITER “I’m always a sucker for risky design choices that become brilliant focal points in a room,” says writer Julie Dugdale, who points to the unfinished-plywood headboard in “Home Made” (page 60) and the bold combination of navy blue walls and vibrant contemporary…

1 min.
true colors

Interior designer Nadia Watts followed one familiar but tricky rule when putting together her deliciously bold dining room: Surround yourself with things you love. Driven by a self-described eclectic style, Watts started with dark walls (Hale Navy by Benjamin Moore)—a practical and versatile base for brighter, more energetic tones and patterns, like the pink and purple hues of the rug and chair upholstery. “Navy makes the room a lot more intimate,” she says. “It’s such a good classic.” ¶ Watts layered in a thoughtful combination of accents she found at local antiques shops and galleries: an ornate gilded mirror, terra-cotta horse figurines, and glazed ginger jars. Whimsical contemporary artwork pops behind the rustic antique chandelier, giving the room a nuanced character. “Adding different textures and materials brings warmth and interest…

1 min.
art & craft

COURTESY OF BOULDER FURNITURE ARTS; COURTESY OF FIN ART CO.; COURTESY OF NEW COLLAR GOODS; COURTESY OF HOUSEFISH;COURTESY OF SIXPENNY; COURTESY OF GARRETT BROWN DESIGNS; COURTESY OF ATLA; COURTESY OF Q CO.…

2 min.
c&a interiors

What do black-and-white, Greek-key-patterned carpeting; high-gloss green doors; and scalloped, custom-milled ceiling trim have in common? They’re all focal points in some of C&A Interiors’ most memorable rooms. Soon after launching in 2011, the Denver-based firm gained a reputation for turning out deeply personal spaces that incorporate unexpected design elements—in a way that feels fresh and classic. Here, principal Ashley Larson Eitemiller gives us a glimpse into the mind behind the designs. 5280 Home: Clearly, you aren’t afraid of daring design moves. What’s a risk you wish your clients were more willing to take? Ashley Larson Eitemiller: Art is such a great expression of personal style; I would love to see people taking bigger risks with art by choosing bigger and bolder pieces. Is there a particular artist on your must-have list? Zaria Forman…

2 min.
sweet spot

Denver ice-cream mogul Paul Tamburello likes circles. After all, ice-cream-machine paddles trace the endless form, and scoops of the cold treat rest sphere-like in (round) bowls. That’s why Tamburello, founder and owner of Little Man Ice Cream, wanted the shape to make appearances throughout his company’s new Sloan’s Lake headquarters, a Willy-Wonka-Chocolate-Factory-esque space that opened this summer. “When a child spins in a circle, she’s lost in space and time,” Tamburello says. “We want the kids in all of us to be wide-eyed by the possibility of life when they enter.” Of course, scooping ice cream into enticing globes is a cinch compared to integrating curves into a right-angled building. Circles are a challenge to build, says architect Ted Schultz, who was hired to design the headquarters: “Circles are an egalitarian,…