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Anglers JournalAnglers Journal

Anglers Journal Spring 2018

Anglers Journal celebrates the best writing, photography, illustration, design and sporting art on the topic of fishing. Come join some of the most prolific fishing editors and writers in the industry for the best angling experience on the water.

Country:
United States
Language:
English
Publisher:
Active Interest Media
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4 Issues

IN THIS ISSUE

access_time4 min.
spring tides

The handwriting is familiar, but I have a harder time picturing the boy who wrote the words. The spelling was bad even then. Fish swam in “scholls,” and on a spring evening 50 years ago, a man in a canoe “caucht” a 12-pound striper. But the enthusiasm I sense thumbing through my boyhood fishing logs feels as familiar as the rough scrawl. “What a morning!” begins the entry for May 5, 1968, when the boy and two older friends took 17 stripers. I still fish the cemetery marsh once or twice each spring, and the stripers are still there. It’s clockwork — the arrival of fish; the smell of the waking marsh, river and sea; the clamorous song of terns, gulls and marsh birds. As a kid, I never gave much thought…

access_time3 min.
contributors

Writer and hard-core surf nut Dave Anderson has been contributing to fishing publications since the early 2000s. He is the editor of the online publication Surfcaster’s Journal and spends his nights fishing for striped bass. Dave and AJ contributor John Lee also publish the blog OutflowFishing.com. In “First Run,” Dave writes about spring striper fishing. Ron Ballanti has worked in the marine electronics and fishing industries for nearly 25 years and has fished some of the world’s top destinations with the best captains on the water. An avid angler, he enjoys sharing his experiences through articles and photographs. Ron writes about professional-grade sonar as a game-changer in this issue. Maryland-based photographer Jay Fleming focuses on the fish, wildlife, cultures and landscapes of Chesapeake Bay. His first book, Working the Water, documents the…

access_time8 min.
mail

PILAR IN BRONZE I love the quality of Anglers Journal, especially the slant toward making everything in it a bit of art. High quality, to my mind. On that note, I thought you might enjoy my latest bronze sculpture. It’s Ernest Hemingway’s Pilar fighting a marlin in the Gulf Stream, circa 1938. The foundry worked on it for six months. The piece is about 40 inches long, 14 inches wide, a foot tall and probably weighs 50 pounds. It is mounted on mahogany. Sculpture is the culmination of my life’s experiences. When I was a teenager we moved from Fort Worth to Corpus Christi, Texas. On our very first fishing trip out of Port Aransas we began trolling, knowing no better, between the jetties. My brother caught a tarpon. We, too, were…

access_time3 min.
one of a kind

Bernard “Lefty” Victor Kreh — one of the most influential figures in fishing during the past 70 years — was an author, journalist, photographer and tackle innovator who taught thousands of people how to cast a fly. He died March 14, 2018, in his Cockeysville, Maryland, home after a brief illness. He was 93. Kreh not only reinvented the way fly anglers cast, but he also created some of the most successful modern salt- and freshwater fly patterns, and collaborated in the design of numerous pieces of gear. He caught 126 species on every continent except for Antarctica, and fished with four U.S. presidents, Ernest Hemingway, Fidel Castro, Ted Williams, Jimmy Dean, Tom Brokaw, Patagonia founder Yvon Chouinard, Flip Pallot, Bob Clouser, Bob Popovics and many others. A beloved figure, Kreh…

access_time9 min.
‘one damn fine month’

Sometimes you should just take the day off. May 12, 2017, was one of those days. If I had not, if I had let that May 12 slip away, if it had become just another workday where I woke up, fought traffic, sat in meetings, and answered emails and phone calls before fighting some more traffic, getting home, eating dinner, watching TV and going to bed, well, let’s just say it would have been a mistake. I took the day off after I saw an approaching high-pressure system settling in with temperatures rising into the low 70s. As Morgan Freeman’s character Red said in The Shawshank Redemption, “May is one damn fine month to be working outdoors.” The same can be said of fishing — particularly in the Northeast, where options…

access_time19 min.
tom and the fat boys

Over coffee one day during the spring of 1969, Woody Sexton introduced me to his friend Tom McGuane. At the time, Tom; his wife, Becky; and their young son, Thomas, were living on Summerland Key. Tom, a tall, handsome writer in his late 20s, was fishing the Loggerhead Basin from inside a 16-foot Roberts skiff powered by a 33-hp Evinrude engine and steered by a tiller. That winter he wrote his first piece for Sports Illustrated magazine, “The Longest Silence,” maybe the best article ever written on flats fishing. After reading it that summer, I sent him a congratulatory letter, and he responded by inviting me to join him that fall on his ranch outside Livingston, Montana, for a week of trout fishing. To this day I am surprised I…

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