EXPLOREMY LIBRARY
Science
Australian Geographic

Australian Geographic January - February 2016

Australian Geographic, Australia’s premier geographic journal, brings you the best of the country from those who know it best. Discover Australia’s rich cultural heritage, its beautiful landscapes, its unique and diverse plants and wildlife, and explore outback towns and the true-blue characters who call them home.

Country:
Australia
Language:
English
Publisher:
Australian Geographic Holdings Pty Ltd
Frequency:
Bimonthly
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6 Issues

in this issue

1 min.
online

The content doesn’t end with this issue of the journal. You’ll _ nd thousands more articles, images and videos online. Discover all the stories highlighted here at: australiangeographic.com.au/issue130 Australia’s prettiest scenes in panorama Australia abounds in beauty, and photographer Ken Duncan has captured some of its finest angles. See a gallery of his incredible images. High Country cattlemen In this gallery, photographer Melanie Faith Dove depicts Australian mountain cattlemen at work. Perth through a local lens See evocative images from Australian Geographic photographer Frances Andrijich’s new book Perth. EXCLUSIVE CONTENT ACTIVATE YOUR WEB ACCESS Entire digital archive of the magazine Exclusive videos and documentary series Interactive maps 10% discount at the AG shop Membership to the Australian Geographic Society Join now: www.australiangeographic.com.au…

1 min.
heroes

From the Editor-in-chief WELCOME TO AUSTRALIAN GEOGRAPHIC’s 30th anniversary edition, which we are celebrating with a brand-new look. Our talented team has been hard at work for six months to freshen up the content and layout, and we created a dramatic new cover design. We hope you’ll enjoy poring over this landmark edition as much as we have enjoyed putting it together. Our regular photographers are often the unsung heroes of AG as they battle bad weather, poor light and other unexpected challenges to capture those photos that bring our stories so vividly to life. We put them firmly in the spotlight for our birthday issue and invited them to nominate their favourite photos. It’s great to revisit classic images, such as the swagman on the Birdsville Track, and hear the backgrounds…

1 min.
contributors

Frank Povah has been working as a copy editor for AG since the mid-1980s. His first corrections were read over the public telephone at Wollar, NSW – a village boasting the last manual exchange in the state – as he sat on a crate with proofs arranged around him and weighted down by rocks. His passion is ‘dinkum lingo’, the once-rich Australian dialect and accent that is rapidly giving way to TV English, the language of US script writers (see page 15). Jason Edwards is a longtime contributor who has travelled the world for several decades, also working for publications such as National Geographic, BBC Wildlife and The New Yorker. His passion for wildlife and the environment has seen him take on unusual assignments, such as the time he spent 300…

3 min.
your say

Featured Letter HISTORIC GLIDERS Thanks for the feature on Heather Swan and Glenn Singleman’s wingsuit flight (Crossing the canyon, AG 127). Their photo from above the Grand Canyon reminded me that it was another Australian, and good mate of mine, Hans Heydrich, who was one of the first two people to hang-glide across the canyon in June 1985 (the other was American Bob Thomson). Hans took an equally great photo from his hang-glider on his flight, showing the Grand Canyon tourist Cessna way below him. Hans and I graduated in mechanical engineering at the University of Adelaide in 1967. He went on to become a third-generation pilot; his father Fred flew for the Luftwaffe, and his grandfather flew Zeppelins. Sadly, Hans died in a glider crash on Lake Pleasant, Arizona, in September 2002. BOB…

1 min.
readers’ photos

Spiky visitor I live on a rural property, 23km outside of Mungindi, QLD. I took this photo of a young echidna as it passed near my house. It curled into a ball when I approached, so I just lay on my stomach and patiently waited for it to keep going on its way, which it did happily. Cloudy cliffs I captured this image early in the morning on the Overland Track in Cradle Mountain-Lake St Clair National Park, TAS. Fog was rolling down the buttongrass of Pelion Plains, beneath the imposing dolerite cliffs of Mt Oakleigh. Pup of the sea About a two-hour drive north of Perth is a town called Jurien Bay. Out on the nearby islands, the Australian sea lion can be found hauling out. I was enjoying a snorkel when this pup…

1 min.
big picture

WATCH Use the free viewaapp to scan this page and see Chris Duczynski’s aerial footage of Sharky Beach surfers. Wave riders ABOUT 100M from Sharky Beach, on the NSW Illawarra Coast, waves break both ways over a seaweed-smothered reef, generating masses of aerated foam. Chris captured this image of surfers at midday with his GoPro and drone. Although dawn and dusk are often favoured by photographers, Chris prefers the abstract results when the sun is directly over the water. “When you’re up 30m high at this time of day, the colours are more vibrant,” he says. “It looks as if the surfers are riding over a carpet of grass.” Dinkum lingo WITH FRANK POVAH Brass razoo/rahzoo [Not worth a] THIS IS an interesting phrase of unknown origin. Never used in the positive sense (“It only cost…