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BBC Countryfile Magazine July 2020

Countryfile Magazine inspires you to explore forgotten corners of the great British countryside and provides knowledge of the people and wildlife that inhabit it. We want to tempt you into trying new things, seek out new places and make the most of Britain’s beautiful landscapes.

Country:
United Kingdom
Language:
English
Publisher:
Immediate Media Company London Limited
Frequency:
Monthly
$8.20(Incl. tax)
$69.37(Incl. tax)
13 Issues

in this issue

1 min
local heroes

"Back in March, I planned to go for a walk with a local friend to record the eerie and enchanting bubbling calls and songs of nesting curlews on a farm in the nearby Black Mountains for a podcast. But the Covid-19 lockdown put paid to that. No chance of seeing or hearing these rare birds in 2020. Or so I thought. Forced to wander the local footpaths and lanes rather than escape to more glamorous spring locations, I began to notice all manner of curious things – wildlife I didn’t know existed here, fascinating historic sites and hidden corners of beauty. And I heard a curlew just 10 minutes’ walk from my house. I couldn’t believe it – a pair was nesting in the uniform pastures near the river. What a…

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1 min
this month’s contributors

Matt Gaw, page 22 “With 120 miles of navigable water, the Broads is the UK’s wild Venice: a waterscape of wonder and wandering, pulling in seven million people a year.” Kathryn Ferry, page 52 “Fitted with bedrooms, living space and a kitchen, the standard camping coach slept six for a weekly charge of £2 10s.” Dave Goulson, page 36 “Our gardens could become a network of tiny nature reserves, supporting biodiversity, storing carbon in the soil and trees, providing home-grown food.” Photos: Oliver Edwards, RSPB Images…

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2 min
july in the country

REFLECTIONS IN RED A glowing sun lowers over a field of poppies near Brighton in Sussex. These ebullient blooms spring into action from June to August and tend to cultivate fallow fields and disturbed ground, seen to heartrending effect after the First World War. Although artificial poppies flourish as a symbol of Rememberance, the delicate wildflowers are in decline due to intensive agriculture practices. Increasingly, their cheerful yet poignant beauty is confined to road verges, scrub and waste ground. RIVER VIEW Often overlooked in favour of its famous neighbour, the Dove, the River Manifold is no less charming as it winds its way through the limestone crags of the Peak District. It creates a particularly pretty scene as it flows under St Bertram’s Bridge, a beautiful single-span stone crossing of medieval origin, before…

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3 min
on the farm with adam henson

One unexpected legacy of the pandemic has been the benefit to the environment. Travel bans, lockdown restrictions and factory closures saw wildlife thrive, carbon emissions fall and improvements to air and water quality. And for what seemed like the first time in years, biofuels were discussed in the pages of the national papers. Biofuels are a potential replacement for the fossil fuels we came to rely on throughout the 20th century – mainly petrol and diesel. They are made from living, non-food crops that absorb carbon dioxide as they grow so that burning them doesn’t add to the warming gases that have become such a global headache. Biodiesel is an alternative to conventional diesel that can be made from oilseed rape, while bioethanol is a replacement for petrol that is produced…

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1 min
your lockdown photos

Send us your photos Email your images to photos@countryfile.com…

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3 min
sara maitland

“I turned 70 barely a fortnight before everyone had to self-isolate. Just before that, though, my family gave me a lovely birthday party. We didn’t know how long it would be before we saw each other again, but we had a noisy happy dinner with speeches and cake and fireworks. And excellent presents. And one of the presents turned out to be the perfect gift for what was about to happen: I was given a smartphone because I have no mobile access at home but do have broadband and my son and daughter thought it would allow me to WhatsApp with my grandchild in the USA. And, along with other features, it came with a stargazing app. In southern Scotland, as in other places, we had one of the dreariest, wettest first…

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