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Bicycling South AfricaBicycling South Africa

Bicycling South Africa

September/October 2019

Bicycling is South Africa’s leading cycling magazine and is aimed at both road and mountain biking enthusiasts. Launched in February 2003, it is published 10 times a year, targeting the fast-growing and affluent lifestyle cycling market – youngsters, adults, professional as well as casual cyclists. The magazine is filled with the best international and local content for every element of the cyclist’s life from training techniques and fitness information to inspiring human interest stories, event news, nutrition and motivation. Bicycling is also South Africa’s leading tester of bikes and gear with over 30% of the monthly magazine dedicated to the latest reviews so our readers can make the best choices.

Country:
South Africa
Language:
English
Publisher:
Media 24 Ltd
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6 Issues

IN THIS ISSUE

access_time1 min.
bicycling south africa

editor Mike Finch (mike.finch@media24.com) senior designer Alana Munnik (alana.newmovementdesign@gmail.com) chief sub/managing editor Dave Buchanan online editor Penny Rrevena (penny.trevena@media24.com) gear editor Jon Minster (jon@jonminster.co.za) online commercial manager Tentl Barros (yentl.barros@media24.com) PUBLISHING AND MARKETING publishing & production manager Gerda EngelVrecht commercial head of events Francois Malan 021 408 1228 (francois.malan@media24.com) commercial manager Lise Coetsee 021 443 9833 (lise.coetsee@media24.com) marketing assistant Andile Nkosi 021 408 3848 (andile.nkosi@media24.com) ADVERTISING SALES TEAM business manager: sales Danie Nell 082 859 0542 (danie.nell@media24.com) CAPE TOWN Gannes Burger 076 152 4605 (hannes.burger@media24.com) Nick Fitzell 071 430 6311 (nick.fitzell@media24.com) Daniela Di Fiovanni 083 709 7040 (daniela.digiovanni@media24.com) JOHANNESBURG Kylee RoVertson 076 263 9114 (kylee.robertson@media24.com) Jeanine Iruger 082 342 2299 (jeanine.kruger@media24.com) Lizel Pauw 082 876 8189 (lizel.pauw@media24.com) Sharlene Smith 083 583 1604 (sharlene.smith@media24.com) Tumna Rojan 072 399 5789 (yumna.rojan@media24.com) Yelanda Mitchell 074 897 576 (yelanda.mitchell@media24.com) CIRCULATION SALES & SOLUTIONS circulation manager Riaan Weyers 021 503 7179 subscription manager Jenny Marinus product manager Ebrahim Jeftha 021 503 7169 SHARED…

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press start for adventure!

The Fortuner has a powerful pedigree. It’s been the bestselling medium-sized SUV in South Africa for a very long time, and for good reason: you could argue that as a four-wheeled investment, it offers the most practicality and value on South African roads. It’s hard to find a tar and trail partner that offers as much bang for your buck. Here are four reasons it should be your next lifestyle investment (with training benefits): 1. IT CAN CARRY ALL THE GEAR (AND PEOPLE) YOU NEED. Want to be able to ferry your kids or friends around safely, and make sure you have enough space for all your bikes and everything you need to find adventure? Sorted – the Fortuner has plenty of interior space, and a decent-sized boot area. It’s a seven-seater…

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join the ride

“LOOK, DAD!” MY SON URGED AS WE ROUNDED THE BEND ONTO THE COBBLES OF THE CHAMPS-ELYSÉES. And there I was, riding up cycling’s most famous road, closed for the occasion, with my cycling-mad son. No cars, no mad cabs, no wandering pedestrians – just a pelaton of cyclists. // AS WE SLOWED, TAKING IN THE MOMENT, I AM REMINDED THAT IN JUST OVER 24 HOURS, THE WORLD’S GREATEST CYCLISTS WOULD BE HURTLING ALONG THESE SAME COBBLES AT OVER 50KM/H TO THE CHEERS OF OVER A MILLION SPECTATORS. BUT TODAY, IT BELONGED TO US– ORDINARY RIDERS LIVING A DREAM. // THE ROAD RISES MORE STEEPLY THAN IT APPEARS ON TV AS IT MAKES ITS WAY TOWARDS THE ARC DE TRIOMPHE. We don’t get to ride all the way round around the…

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the frame

THE IMPI OF IMPEY Daryl Impey became only the second South African to win an individual stage of the Tour de France when he won the ninth ‘Bastille Day’ stage this year. Sprinter Robbie Hunter last won astage in 2007. Impey has previously held the yellow jersey of in 2013 and is arguably South Africa’s most successful international competitor in history. Here’s Impey sitting in the pack with his SA championship jersey around the Arc de Triomphe during the final stage in Paris. BRAVERY AND PANACHE Julian Alaphilippe, nicknamed LouLou by his fans, almost pulled off the impossible and held the yellow jersey for 14 days to give France hope of an overall victory. He finally succumbed to the might of Team Ineos on the penultimate stage but his panache and bravery made…

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how to carve a pair of your own killer quads

Bulging, carved quads are like flashing neon signs announcing that you’re a cyclist, and you’ve come to kick some ass. And those diamond-cut cannons are more than just aesthetically pleasing in your spandex. The four muscles collectively called the ‘quads’ or quadriceps muscles are the primary movers when you push through the pedal stroke – so stronger quads equals more watts. “Cycling is a power sport,” says David Ertl, PhD, a USA Cycling Level 1 Coach. “You need leg strength to crank out power. That means building all the muscle fibres you can. “If you can get 10 or 20 per cent stronger than the next guy or girl, you won’t fatigue as quickly, and you’ll have that much more in reserve when you need to give a burst up a hill,…

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on-the-bike workouts to build power legs!

1 / SINGLE-LEG PEDALLING Your rectus femoris is the quad muscle that runs straight down the front of your thigh and helps flex your hip – i.e. to pull up and push down the pedals. A great way to work it, along with your other hip flexors – and get a silkier pedal stroke in the process – is a single-leg pedalling drill. “Most people can pedal with one leg for only about 30 seconds before they fatigue, as the hip flexors are neglected when you use both legs. Because the leg pushing down is always pushing the other back up,” says Ertl. How to Do This: Sit on an indoor trainer with one foot clipped in and the other unclipped and propped on a chair or stool. With the bike in an…

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