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Cinema ScopeCinema Scope

Cinema Scope Issue 74 - Spring 2018

With unparalleled depth and breadth, Cinema Scope is one of the most respected English-language publications on film worldwide. Cinema Scope unites experienced critics from across North America with up-and-coming writers. Packed with reviews, essays, festival reports, and interviews, we’re geared to cinephiles looking for an intelligent forum on world cinema. “Advocates for a passionate, poltical and purist engagement with the movies”—The New York Times

Country:
Canada
Language:
English
Publisher:
Cinema Scope Publishing
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4 Issues

IN THIS ISSUE

access_time2 min.
editor’s note

Again, it is with little to no fanfare that we reveal the latest annual ye olde top ten list of films that premiered in festivals (eight), theatrical release (one), or on Showtime (number one) in the calendar year 2017. The only question that occupies my mind about this mostly useless, populist endeavour is whether David Lynch’s career-topper should be referred to as Twin Peaks: The Return or simply Twin Peaks; while the latter is the title that appears in the opening credits of each episode, I’ve chosen to go with the former, because that’s what we’ve been doing all along, and now is not the time to admit defeat. As for the rest of the list, it should not be surprising when I point out that each of these films has…

access_time1 min.
the cinema scope top ten 2017

1 TWIN PEAKS: THE RETURN DAVID LYNCH 2 WESTERN VALESKA GRISEBACH 3 ZAMA LUCRECIA MARTEL 4 ON THE BEACH AT NIGHT ALONE HONG SANGSOO 5 PHANTOM THREAD PAUL THOMAS ANDERSON 6 GOOD TIME JOSH & BENNY SAFDIE 7 STREETSCAPES [DIALOGUE] HEINZ EMIGHOLZ 8 JEANNETTE, L’ENFANCE DE JEANNE D’ARC BRUNO DUMONT 9 FIRST REFORMED PAUL SCHRADER 10 PROTOTYPE BLAKE WILLIAMS SPECIAL MENTION EX LIBRIS: THE NEW YORK PUBLIC LIBRARY FREDERICK WISEMAN CALL ME BY YOUR NAME LUCA GUADAGNINO THE DAY AFTER HONG SANGSOO GOOD LUCK BEN RUSSELL ARABY AFFONSO UCHOA & JOAO DUMANS…

access_time15 min.
paul schrader

Paul Schrader’s First Reformed is his fourth film in five years, following the reinvention-spawning masterpiece The Canyons (2013), the failed, compromised 2014 Nicolas Cage thriller Dying of the Light (recently repurposed, remixed, and reclaimed as a new film entitled Dark), and the gonzo, goofy Nicolas Cage thriller Dog Eat Dog (2016). These previous films are representative of Schrader progressing from the end of a financially supported, studioassisted working methodology into a cheaper, bolder, more liberated one, and First Reformed is the apex of this new phase in what’s now a nearly 50-year career. Schrader shows no signs of slowing down. And how unlikely is that? Watching First Reformed, one sees a theoretical thinker continuing to push the tools of his chosen medium into unexplored places. Even more unlikely: First Reformed finds…

access_time14 min.
“you never heard of code-switching, motherfucker?”

Joseph Kahn did not much care for Damien Chazelle’s La La Land (2016). When the movie opened, he unleashed a sarcastic Twitter storm: “White people will love LA LA LAND…The dance numbers in LA LA LAND feel like Verizon commercials…99% of the couples in LA are interracial, except the one in LA LA LAND, and the white couples at Cinerama Dome watching that white couple…LA LA LAND is exactly like Los Angeles when I got there in 1995. White people swing dancing around coffee shops…I have yet to meet one black person who saw LA LA LAND who didn’t complain about how wack the dancing and singing was.” Kahn’s spectacular new movie Bodied (which was in postproduction when La La Land was released) can perhaps be thought of as the anti-La…

access_time19 min.
community/theatre

“What does it matter? All is grace.” —Curé d’Ambricourt, Journal d’un curé de campagne The question in any cinema that aspires to be devotional is this: where can we locate the spirit, the soul, the love? More specifically, where does grace become concrete? For Dreyer, it was in the face; for Scorsese, in the individual’s conscience, in one’s will to do good; and for Dorsky, in the medium itself—revealed only by makers who acknowledge and remain sensitive to its formal situation. For Chicago-based filmmaker Stephen Cone, devotion—a religious observance of God, yes, but also the fervour and allegiance we feel for other people—is a matter of community. It’s in the fact that we live amongst other beings, that we share space with those who desire and believe different things than we…

access_time10 min.
the changing view of man in the portrait

On November 28, 1953, Frank Olson, a civilian American scientist and Central Intelligence Agency employee, fell or jumped through a window from the 13th floor of the Hotel Statler (now the Hotel Pennsylvania) in midtown Manhattan. Thus begins Errol Morris’ plunge into the sordid, sensational CIA “mind-control” program known as MK-Ultra, with Peter Sarsgaard’s defenestrated body flailing in slow motion alongside the opening credits, to the tune of “No Other Love” from the 1953 Rogers and Hammerstein musical Me and Juliet. It’s a literally destabilizing overture to what, 11 feature documentaries and one aborted fiction film into his career, stands as Morris’ most exemplary work to date: a six-part, 241-minute portmanteau of images and textures that utilize virtually every tool in the documentarian’s formal arsenal. It’s an obsessive plunge akin…

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