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Cars & Motorcycles
Classic Motorcycle Mechanics

Classic Motorcycle Mechanics May 2018

Dedicated to the later classics and Japanese machines, Classic Motorcycle Mechanics has it all. Now 116 pages of road tests, rebuild guides, 'Street Specials' reviews and much much more... Staff Bikes - Classic Motorcycle Mechanics is the only magazine that "Buys its own bikes, rebuilds 'em and rides 'em".

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Country:
United Kingdom
Language:
English
Publisher:
Mortons Media Group, Ltd
Frequency:
Monthly
BUY ISSUE
$4.53(Incl. tax)
SUBSCRIBE
$49.81(Incl. tax)
12 Issues

in this issue

3 min.
the venerable honda v4s…

We’ve majored on Honda’s V4s this month because – well – it just happened. We’re relatively organised at CMM and have a number of road tests in the bag (we only like taking pictures of people’s pride and joys during sunny months) so when I realised that we had Jim riding a VF750 F from the mid-1980s and John on a VFR from the mid-1990s it seemed a good idea to put both in one magazine to show the path of development between the two. With both Jim and John having been there back in the 1980s to witness both the ‘chocolate camshaft crisis’ of the VFs and seeing the resurgence of the V4 layout with the VFR in the mid-1980s and into the 1990s, who better than them to tell…

2 min.
ultimate v4?

In this issue you’ll see we’ve concentrated on the major V4s from Honda of the 1980s and 1990s. These are the road-going gems, the VF750 F and the VFR750 F-R, but while the VF had its faults, those meant that Honda tried even harder with the F-R. It arguably became the best sports-tourer ever. And then there were the racing V4s. Of the homologation versions (that is, based on ‘road-going’ machines) the VFR750R ‘RC30’ was certainly the most successful and prices show that today, but arguably the ultimate incarnation was its successor, the RC45… The RC45’s life is really one of two halves. At birth, the bike – which was launched for the 1994 model year – had a tough reputation to live up to. The RC30 had won the first two…

3 min.
the pricey honda v4s

In the 1980s Honda delivered unlimited cash to the development of race bikes for podium domination. Perhaps the cash came from booze and tobacco sponsors back in those heady, carcinogenic days and Honda blew it all on delivering race technology to the public. In 1984 Honda delivered the VF1000R which offered 122bhp and one of the first machines with gear-driven cams, but it lived in the shadow of the camshaft failures of the earlier VF750F. Bad reputations travel quickly and the stink always lingers, so the VF1000R was viewed as ‘the bike that blew up’. Also, 122bhp did lead to a few riders crashing and the bike was also very expensive, so sales weren’t great and the bike was made in very limited numbers. It also had another problem, it was a…

3 min.
honda’s cheaper v4s

V4 victory, that’s how Honda teased 1980s riders of inline four motorcycles to consider changing their motorcycle habits. Hindsight is a wonderful thing, and it wasn’t until the VFR750 arrived in 1986 that confidence was restored in the V4 configuration, the rest is history. Honda gave motorcycling a whole range of new V4 models in 1983; their owners mostly gave them back under warranty shortly after taking out their HP agreements. Horror stories of chocolate cams were mostly associated with the VF750F and the largely forgotten VF750SC, other models were guilty by association and Honda was left with Creme Egg on its face. If you fancy buying one of these V4 models, chances are if they are running now then any mechanical gremlins have been long since addressed. For decades there’s been no love…

1 min.
the latest riding kit, top tools, tyres, retro clothing and more!

SLINKY GLIDE REPAIR KIT Wemoto does it again. This kit can repair most mechanical speedometers, which is perfect if you can’t find that elusive speedo cable for your bike. The new Mechanical Speedo Repair Kit contains a 1.5m by 3.2mm cable, three nipple adapters, a tool and instructions. All packed in a neat portable container. www.wemoto.com BIKETEK HEATED GRIPS Biketek heated grips should see us through the mildly cold period we call ‘spring’. Complete with multi-heat settings a simple two button controller box can be handlebar mounted to give the rider ease of use while wearing gloves and riding. Best of all, they’re easy fit and come with bar-ends. www.bikeit.co.uk AURITECH EAR PLUGS If you don’t wear ear plugs you should – as speeds in excess of 50mph are likely to harm your hearing. These…

2 min.
riding kit worn, tools twirled & tyres turned

TOMTOM RIDER 410 Simply put, this has been the biggest and most positive addition to my biking life since the humble earplug. Twenty-three years back I never bothered with earplugs as I was a refusenik: let’s just say I was nil by ear canal, but when I tried them I was convinced. It’s been the same with sat nav – or at least until I tried a TomTom. Now, I’m not knocking the opposition here – I’ve used Garmin in the past (first time was on a BMW launch in 2001 and I had my own black and white hand-held) but by the time I had moved up to the TomTom Rider 410 system, perhaps I wasn’t such a Luddite as I once was. I still love maps, but – over the last…