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CQ Amateur Radio

CQ Amateur Radio October 2018

CQ is the magazine for active hams, with a focus on the practical. Every article is clearly written and aimed at involving you, the reader...whether it's a story of operating from some exotic location, an article to deepen your understanding of ham radio science and technology, or a fun-to-build project that will have practical use in your ham shack. Join us on our monthly journey through the broad and varied landscape of the world's most fascinating hobby!

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Country:
United States
Language:
English
Publisher:
CQ Communications, Inc.
Frequency:
Monthly
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12 Issues

in this issue

16 min.
announcements

OCTOBER ALPENA, MICHIGAN — The Thunder Bay Amateur Radio Club will hold the 5th Annual Alpena Swap Meet from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., Saturday, October 6 at the Alpena Mall, 2380 U.S. 23 South. Email: <w1up@thunderbayarc.org>. Website: <http://thunderbayarc.org>. BELTON, TEXAS — The Temple Amateur Radio Club will hold HamEXPO from 7 a.m. to noon, Saturday, October 6 at the Bell County EXPO Center, 301 Loop 121. Email: <hamexpo@tarc.org> or <expo@tarc.org>. Website: <www.tarc.org>. Talk-in 146.820-(PL 123). VE exams. BOWLING GREEN, KENTUCKY — The Kentucky Colonels Amateur Radio Club will hold the 7th Annual Vette City Hamfest from 7:30 a.m. to 2 p.m., Saturday, October 6 at the WKU-Knicely Conference Center, 2355 Nashville Road. Contact: Frank Armstrong, KI4HEJ, (270) 781-0349. Email: <frankarmstrong@insightbb.com>. Website: <www.vettecityhamfest.com>. Talk-in 147.33 (PL 107.2). HOLLYWOOD, MARYLAND — The St. Mary’s County…

6 min.
ham radio news

Will WWV, WWVB and WWVH Go QRT? The National Institute of Standards and Technology has proposed shutting down radio stations WWV, WWVB, and WWVH as part its budget request for the 2019 fiscal year, which begins October 1. WWV — in Colorado — and WWVH — in Hawaii — transmit standard time, frequency, and propagation information on the HF bands. WWVB, on 60 kHz, provides digital time signals to set and synchronize so-called “atomic” wristwatches, clocks, and myriad other consumer devices. NIST says closing the stations will save $6.3 million in the coming year, after noting elsewhere in its budget request that “for every tax dollar invested in NIST, almost $50 of value is created in the economy year over year.” It is up to Congress to make final decisions on the…

4 min.
zero bias: a cq editorial

“What draws kids to ham radio today?” I was asked by a reader at the Huntsville Hamfest in August. “After all, they’ve got their smartphones and the internet.” I don’t remember my exact reply, but I’ve given it more thought since I’ve gotten home, especially in light of events later that same day. In retrospect, my response should have been, “maybe the fact that it isn’t a smartphone or the internet. It’s a challenge, just as it always has been, and kids love a challenge.” Smartphones and the internet offer many things, but challenges are not high on that list. Another part of the answer is, in some cases, “the same as it’s always been — DX and contesting.” This was reinforced in several ways at Huntsville, where CQ joined in…

4 min.
news bytes

The Return of 4U1UN United Nations headquarters amateur radio station 4U1UN may be back on the air by the time you read this. United Nations Staff Recreation Council Amateur Radio Club President James Sarte, K2QI, reported on the club’s Facebook page in August that “we’re one step closer to being back on the air,” with the installation of a SteppIR “BigIR” vertical antenna on the roof of the UN Secretariat building in New York City (see photo). 4U1UN has been off the air for several years as a result of major renovations at the Secretariat and tightened security following the 9/11 terrorist attacks. Sarte said that he, along with Dmitri Zhikharev, RA9USU, and Adrian Ciuperca, KO8SCA, have been working with the UN administration to secure space for a new station and that…

14 min.
neighbors helping neighbors – ham style

Local amateur radio clubs are well positioned to organize their hometowns against disasters that disrupt or destroy normal lines of communication. Club members share much more than a common interest in amateur radio. The club’s presence itself demonstrates a degree of organizational competence in the areas of governance, finance, and internal communication. Most clubs also engage in recruitment, event planning, teaching, and community service. Members are drawn from the community and represent its many facets with vested interests and reciprocal goodwill. At the same time, public awareness of two-way radio’s utility, and the inexpensive peace-of-mind it provides, is heightened after the telecommunications infrastructure has been flattened spectacularly and repeatedly in the years since Hurricane Katrina. Radio Relay International calls on our nation’s radio clubs to organize and train their communities, using their considerable…

12 min.
beyond untethered …

In our article published in the September 2017 issue of CQ Amateur Radio entitled “Go Untethered! Operate Your Station with a Wireless Headset,” we described the use of the Plantronics CS520 wireless headset with your radio setup. The headset allowed the operator to free themselves from the constraints of a headset cable and to operate their radio wirelessly from anywhere in or around the house. This gave the user an approximately 350-foot range of operation with the ability to mute the microphone when necessary and to transmit via VOX or PTT control. The 2017 CQ article described how to modify the cabling to work with most current amateur radio equipment. Since publishing “Go Untethered,” we have been contacted by a large number of hams who have completed the project and are…