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Decanter Oct-2018

Published by Time Inc. (UK) Ltd The world’s best wine magazine. It is simply the “wine bible”. Every month it provides recommendations on the world’s finest wines and tells you where you can find them. From top Bordeaux to the best value wine on the shelf, Decanter guides you through a maze of wine to help you find the right wine for you. It also offers interviews with leading wine personalities, in-depth guides to the wine regions and the latest wine news.

Country:
United Kingdom
Language:
English
Publisher:
Time Inc. (UK) Ltd
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12 Issues

IN THIS ISSUE

access_time1 min.
el monte, tarija, bolivia

The El Monte vineyard stretches across 85ha of the Santa Ana Valley in southern Bolivia’s Tarija region. It is primarily planted with 10-year-old Tannat vines, plus some Petit Verdot and Muscat of Alexandria, which grow in heavy clay soils, located 1,900m above sea level. El Monte’s lofty altitude provides high UV exposure and wide-ranging diurnal temperatures, giving deep-coloured but fresh wines, with ripe tannins and high acidity. The climate is defined by two converging influences: the cold, arid Sama Mountain Range and the warm, low-lying Gran Chaco plain. To the left of the vineyard a line of carob trees leads to the Cordillera de Sama, a protected area of Inca trails and flamingo lagoons. Since 1975 El Monte has been part of the Campos de Solana estate, owned by…

access_time2 min.
john stimpfig

THIS MONTH WE focus on the vinous delights of South America. Only very recently, this effectively meant Chile and Argentina. But as you’ll have no doubt noticed in this and recent issues, the rapidly improving wines of Brazil, Uruguay and Bolivia are also gaining greater distribution, traction and relevance in international markets.Deservedly so: it should come as no great surprise. In the last few years, investment, expertise, experimentation and quality have increased in all three countries. Following on from that, so too have the number of medal-winning wines being entered in the Decanter World Wine Awards from all three nations. Last year, Brazil excelled by bagging three Golds for the first time. But in 2018, Uruguay came top of the chasing pack with a hugely impressive medal strike-rate of…

access_time3 min.
amonth in wine

The D122 road links some of the most prestigious vineyards in Burgundy Value of top Burgundy vineyards soars PRICES FOR TOP-END Burgundy grand cru vineyards in the Côte d’Or have doubled in the past decade, from an estimated €7 million in 2008 to just under €14 million in 2017, according to French land agency Safer.The increase follows several years of soaring global demand for wines from the most prized Burgundy climats, coupled with high-profile vineyard buyouts by wealthy investors in recent years.However, there is a wide variation in valuation; Safer said the prices of grands crus started at an estimated €2.75 million per hectare in 2017.When François Pinault, the owner of Bordeaux first growth Château Latour, bought Clos de Tart in Morey-St-Denis last year, the value of the…

access_time2 min.
around the wine world

Douro: extreme weather conditions UNESCO proposes wine industry climate change role Climate change is the biggest risk to UNESCO World Heritage sites, and the wine industry can help the United Nations body to research and measure its impact through a recently proposed Climate Vulnerability Index.So said Irina Bokova, UNESCO director-general from 2009 to 2017, at a climate change summit held in Porto and co-hosted by wine trade members including Taylor’s Port. Wine regions feature prominently on the UNESCO World Heritage list, with Alto Douro, Bordeaux, Burgundy, Champagne and Piedmont all enjoying protected status.Bokova said that the proposed climate index would help to prioritise ideas for making areas more resilient to climate change. ‘The Douro Valley can be a very good example of how this new index can be…

access_time1 min.
in brief

■ The English summer heatwave has raised winemakers’ hopes of a bumper crop to follow. ‘There has been very little rain and no wind during this crucial flowering period, which is as near to perfect as it gets,’ said Charles and Ruth Simpson from Simpsons Wine Estate in Kent. Simon Bladon, owner of Jenkyn Place predicted the harvest could be ‘three times the size of 2017’.■ A blue-coloured wine, Vindigo, has gone on sale in France. Made by Bodegas Perfer in Spain’s Almería region, the wine is said to be made from Chardonnay grapes that have undergone skin maceration. The company’s Facebook page states: ‘Vindigo owes its elegant blue colour to a natural pigment found in the grape skin.’ ■ The owner of Château Pichon Baron, AXA Millésimes, has…

access_time3 min.
letters

Allies in wine IN THESE TIMES of political upheaval, may I recommend to fellow Decanter readers the remarkable ways that Pinot Noir can elegantly evade any political differences and bring us together. I dearly love good Burgundy but, for a number of reasons, it is somewhat difficult to obtain locally. On the other hand, I am more or less awash in good-quality California Pinots. While the California version would never in my experience be mistaken for a quality Burgundy, they can be exquisite in their expression of the fruit and provide such a different experience from a true Burgundian as to nearly seem a separate variety altogether. I would urge my European brothers in wine appreciation to seek out California Pinot Noirs and let the varied expression of the…

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