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Emmy MagazineEmmy Magazine

Emmy Magazine

Issue #4 2019

Special for the Emmy Awards! Watch the exclusive Back Stage Live show on your iPad free! Sponsored by Audi. Emmy covers not only television’s stars, but also the achievements of artists, crafts experts and businesspeople who work behind the camera. It also explores the future of television, reporting on the latest tools and technological advances.

Country:
United States
Language:
English
Publisher:
Academy of Television Arts & Sciences
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6 Issues

IN THIS ISSUE

access_time2 min.
welcome

We’ve all heard the expression “less is more,” and there are definitely occasions when it’s true. But sometimes, well, more is more.In the television industry, there seems to be more of everything these days.For starters, there’s more content — a lot more. In 2018, a record 496 scripted series appeared on broadcast, cable and streaming platforms. That’s an increase of nearly 30 percent over the previous five years. Add unscripted and documentary programming, and the amount is astounding.There are also more platforms. The broadcast, basic cable and premium cable networks continue to thrive, and according to reports, within a year, Netflix, Amazon, Hulu, CBS All Access and the dozens of other streaming services will be joined by at least three new major entrants — from Apple, Disney and WarnerMedia.And,…

access_time2 min.
emmy magazine

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF: Juan MoralesEDITOR: Gail PolevoiMANAGING EDITOR: Maura WeberASSOCIATE EDITOR: Sarah Hirsch CREATIVE DIRECTION & DESIGN: Bleiweiss DesignPHOTO DIRECTION: Rose Cefalu HEAD OF ADVERTISING & BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT: Rose Einstein einstein@televisionacademy.com FOUNDING PUBLISHER: Hank RiegerEDITORIAL ADVISER: Russ Patrick TELEVISION ACADEMY PRESIDENT AND COO: Maury McIntyreCFO AND EXECUTIVE VICE-PRESIDENT, BUSINESS OPERATIONS: Heather CochranSENIOR VICE-PRESIDENT, AWARDS: John LeverenceSENIOR VICE-PRESIDENT, MEDIA & BRAND MANAGEMENT: Susan SpencerVICE-PRESIDENT, AWARDS: Julie ShoreVICE-PRESIDENT, EVENT PRODUCTION: Barb HeldVICE-PRESIDENT, MARKETING: Laurel Whitcomb EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, TELEVISION ACADEMY FOUNDATION: Jodi DelaneyPUBLIC RELATIONS REPRESENTATION: breakwhitelight LEGAL COUNSEL: Alan J. Epstein, Esq., and George E. Constantine, Esq., Venable LLP DIGITALDIGITAL CONTENT PRODUCER: Melissa ByersSENIOR VIDEO PRODUCER: Angel ThompsonSENIOR WEB DEVELOPER: Erwin Yuson LEADERSHIPCHAIRMAN: Frank SchermaVICE-CHAIR: Steve Venezia, CASSECOND VICE-CHAIR: Tim GibbonsSECRETARY: Sharon Lieblein, CSATREASURER: Allison BinderVICE-CHAIR, LOS ANGELES AREA: Mitch Waldow Board of Governors:…

access_time2 min.
the accidental actress

On the surface, London native Jameela Jamil leads a charmed life — her first acting audition landed her the role of Tahani Al-Jamil on NBC’s The Good Place. But growing up deaf, having severe body-image issues, being hit by cars twice and enduring multiple surgeries, she says, are what truly led to her success. Surgery at age twelve restored hearing to one ear, but self-hatred proved harder to correct. “I hated my skin color and my ethnicity, my weight and my curvy Indian hips. I became very self-hating because I never saw myself represented on television,” the half-Indian, half-Pakistani actress says. “Getting hit by a car that broke my back — which meant I spent a year in bed — massively changed the rest of my life, and made…

access_time3 min.
shortcomings and goings

Every morning, Nick Hornby leaves his home in London and walks ten minutes to an apartment where he writes. During the day, he might go to the gym. Sometimes he does a crossword or jigsaw puzzle. He’ll have lunch and listen to music. “There’s a lot of messing around,” he jokes. But when he sits down at his desk and starts to write, magic happens. The celebrated novelist and screenwriter recently delivered his first television series, the comedy State of the Union, which will premiere on Sundance TV and its companion streaming service, Sundance Now, May 6. In the deceptively simple premise, an estranged married couple, played by Rosamund Pike and Chris O’Dowd, meet each week in the same London pub just before their regular counseling session. They volley…

access_time2 min.
respect on the set

Alicia Rodis has worked as an actor for more than twenty years, and she knows how uncomfortable it can be to perform an intimate scene in front of a crew or an audience. There were times, she reflects, when “It just felt like something that I had to do and get through, because if I didn’t want to do it, there were hundreds, thousands of actors that would.” No one should feel like they have to “get through” an intimate scene, which is why, in 2015, well before the Time’s Up movement began, Rodis cofounded Intimacy Directors International (IDI). The nonprofit represents intimacy coordinators, who work as liaisons between actors and directors in television, film and theater to ensure that such scenes are handled in a professional and respectful…

access_time2 min.
of love & law

“Three years, three months and two days into my law practice, I quit,” recalls David Hemingson, the showrunner of ABC’s espionage dramedy Whiskey Cavalier. After graduating from Columbia Law School and pursuing a career as an entertainment attorney, Hemingson chucked it all in the mid-’90s to chase his dream of becoming a TV writer. “The only tough thing was the bone-crushing load of student debt,” he says. “But I just fell in love with TV.”Hemingson followed a circuitous path, starting out on the subversive Nickelodeon sitcom The Adventures of Pete & Pete before segueing into animated shows ranging from 101 Dalmatians: The Series to Family Guy. “I feel really lucky that I got that experience, because animation requires you to think visually,” he says. “It’s all about being surprising…

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