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Fine Art ConnoisseurFine Art Connoisseur

Fine Art Connoisseur

September/October 2019

art magazine for collectors of fine art

Country:
United States
Language:
English
Publisher:
Streamline Publishing
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6 Issues

IN THIS ISSUE

access_time1 min.
fine art connoisseur

“There are some drawings by [Verrocchio’s] hand …, made with much patience and very great judgment, among which are certain heads of women, beautiful in expression and in the adornment of the hair, which Leonardo da Vinci was ever imitating for their beauty.” — “Life of Andrea Verrocchio” in Giorgio Vasari’s The Lives of the Most Excellent Painters, Sculptors, and Architects (1568) Andrea del Verrocchio (c. 1435–1488), Head of a Woman with Braided Hair (recto), late 1470s, black chalk or charcoal, lead white gouache, pen and brown ink, reworked with oil charcoal on paper, 12 3/4 x 10 3/4 in. (overall), British Museum, London. On view from September 15, 2019 through January 12, 2020 at the National Gallery of Art, Washington, in the exhibition Verrocchio: Sculptor and Painter of Renaissance Florence. For…

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fine art connoisseur us

PUBLISHER B. Eric Rhoads bericrhoads@gmail.com Twitter: @ericrhoads facebook.com/eric.rhoads ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER Scott Jones sjones@streamlinepublishing.com 406.871.0649 EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Peter Trippi peter.trippi@gmail.com 917.968.4 476 MANAGING EDITOR Brida Connolly bconnolly@streamlinepublishing.com 702.299.0417 CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Matthias Anderson Max Gillies Chuck Neustifter Charles Raskob Robinson Kelly Compton David Masello Louise Nicholson CREATIVE DIRECTOR Alfonso Jones alfonsostreamline@gmail.com 561.327.6033 ART DIRECTOR Kenneth Whitney kwhitney@streamlinepublishing.com 561.655.8778 VICE PRESIDENT OF SALES Bob Hogan bhogan@streamlinepublishing.com 206.321.8990 MARKETING & DIGITAL AD MANAGER Yvonne Van Wechel yvanwechel@streamlinepublishing.com 602.810.3518 SENIOR MARKETING SPECIALISTS Krystal Allen kallen@streamlinepublishing.com 541.4 47.4787 Gina Ward gward@streamlinepublishing.com 920.743.2405 MARKETING SPECIALISTS Bruce Bingham bbingham@streamlinepublishing.com 512.669.8081 Mary Green mgreen@streamlinepublishing.com 508.230.9928 Scott Jones sjones@streamlinepublishing.com 406.871.0649 Sarah Webb swebb@streamlinepublishing.com 630.4 45.9182 EDITOR, FINE ART TODAY Cherie Haas chaas@streamlinepublishing.com CHAIRMAN/PUBLISHER/CEO B. Eric Rhoads bericrhoads@gmail.com facebook.com/eric.rhoads. Twitter: @ericrhoads EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT/ CHIEF OPERATING OFFICER Tom Elmo telmo@streamlinepublishing.com PRODUCTION DIRECTOR Nicolynn Kuper nkuper@streamlinepublishing.com DIRECTOR OF FINANCE Laura Iserman liserman@streamlinepublishing.com CONTROLLER Jaime Osetek jaime@streamlinepublishing.com CIRCULATION COORDINATOR Sue Henry shenry@streamlinepublishing.com CUSTOMER SERVICE COORDINATOR Jessica Smith jsmith@streamlinepublishing.com CREATIVE DIRECTOR, ADVERTISING Stephen Parker sparker@streamlinepublishing.com ASSISTANT TO THE CHAIRMAN Ali Cruickshank acruickshank@streamlinepublishing.com…

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carrying a new flag for realism

Years ago, while I was visiting Schiller & Bodo, a wonderful gallery of historical art on Manhattan’s Upper East Side, the proprietors (Lisa and Susan) told me, “Fine Art Connoisseur is the standard-bearer for realism in America today.” Of course, I was thrilled that they recognized our efforts. In fact, since the foundation of this magazine, we have worked to familiarize our readers with the new breed of realists, encouraging collectors to acquire their artworks and galleries to represent them. As I have written on this page many times, younger realist artists today, and those who trained them yesterday, will reap massive rewards when they are older because the world will have recognized the value not only of their technical skills, but also of their distinctive takes on contemporary life that are…

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in with the new — but on our terms

In August I visited Cooper Hewitt, the National Design Museum operated by the Smithsonian Institution in New York City. For four months in 1991, I volunteered there as an intern, and although I have returned regularly ever since, I was delighted to find it hopping with visitors on a sultry Tuesday afternoon. On view was the latest edition of the Cooper Hewitt Design Triennial, held — as its name suggests — every three years in order to show us what’s happening in every corner of the design world. On view until January 20, the current edition was co-organized with Cube, a design museum in the Netherlands, and its overall theme is nature. Nature is, of course, the greatest designer ever: our own bodies are nothing short of miraculous, and trees are pretty…

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favorite

When children pose for their portraits, they often require distractions. When Jamie Bernstein and her siblings, Nina and Alexander, sat for a group portrait in the summer of 1967, the painter Jane Wilson (1924–2015) found ways to keep them patient as they posed on her apartment terrace in Italy. “She gave us a deck of cards that we could play with,” recalls Bernstein, the eldest daughter, then 14, of the conductor and composer Leonard Bernstein. “I remember, too, that some records were playing on the stereo, though I have to say it was rather boring to sit there and sit there.” What resulted, though, is something that the three siblings now cherish so much that they refer to the painting as, Jamie explains with affection, “the portrait of the three-headed monster.” Today she…

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three to watch

CARLOS SAGRERA (b. 1987) is a Spanish painter currently residing in Leipzig, Germany — the birthplace of an art movement that became an international phenomenon in the early 2000s. Having earned a B.F.A. from the European University of Madrid in 2011, Sagrera moved to Leipzig three years later, following his admiration of that famous group of German painters, “The New Leipzig School.” Known for figuration that incorporated abstract elements, its members shared a respect for technical skill (mostly derived from the painterly traditions of the centuries-old Leipzig Academy), stylistic experimentation, and exploration of topical subject matter. Sagrera now shares studio space in a converted cotton factory with a new generation of like-minded artists influenced by the New Leipzig School, each with his or her own style and subject matter. For his…

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