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category_outlined / Tech & Gaming
GadgetGadget

Gadget Issue 14

Featuring the most exciting tech, including drones, 3D printers, wearables and virtual reality headsets, Gadget is the next generation of technology magazine. It's the first of its kind to actually explain how consumer kit works, rather than just offering a shopping catalogue of products. As well as exploring real-world applications for the latest releases, Gadget also showcases the greatest gizmos that will make you go ‘wow!’ This means that, instead of just featuring dull phone, tablet and TV launches, you can expect to discover hoverboards, self-driving cars and robots that teach you or your kids to code. If you want to get hands-on with top tech and get the most out of your gear, read Gadget now.

Country:
United Kingdom
Language:
English
Publisher:
Future Publishing Ltd
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IN THIS ISSUE

access_time1 min.
welcome

An Echo of the future I have been waiting years for home automation to take off. I love the idea of all my gadgets working in harmony, but so far the reality isn’t quite what The Jetsons promised. I have a few Wi-Fi-connected Philips Hue bulbs and WeMo switches, so I can check I haven’t left the lights or oven on when I’m out; I own Bluetooth speakers, so I can stream Spotify in different rooms; and I have a security camera that alerts my phone when it detects unusual movement. But all of these involve, at some level, deep-diving into apps on my phone to fiddle with menu options. I’m lazy enough that I’d rather do this than actually get off the sofa and flick a switch, but it doesn’t actually…

access_time1 min.
meet the team...

Dan Hutchinson Editor In Chief I’ve been shopping around for a drone upgrade and the Hexo+ looks ideal for taking aerial photographs. Drew Sleep Production Editor I also work on Retro Gamer magazine, so I have to go for the Nintendo Classic Mini on principle. Aiden Dalby Staff Writer Being the forgetful type, the O is great for reminding me when I need an umbrella or my gym bag. Stephen Williams Senior Art Editor I quite like my ‘virtual assistants’ to sound loud and crisp, so the Echo Dot really appeals to me.…

access_time2 min.
gopro enters the drone wars

“It’s designed to be as portable as possible” Range and speed GoPro says the Karma can reach speeds of up to 35mph and has a maximum travel distance of 1km (about 3/5 of a mile) Folding arms It’s not the tiniest drone in the world, but the arms and landing gear do fold in, so it shrinks to a width of less than 23cm for storage Lightweight shell Weighing in at 1,006 grams, the GoPro Karma drone should just about be light enough to carry on your back – perhaps in the supplied carrying case In the box The drone comes with a controller, a case and a Grip video stabiliser accessory, but you have to pay extra if you want to get a camera, too One button operation Taking off and landing are the most dangerous parts of flying…

access_time3 min.
turn your fingers into a phone with sgnl

Round the clock battery? The Sgnl’s charge will last a full week on standby, but will last only four hours of talk time so may not be the best option for people that enjoy really long conversations Fingertip communication The circular pad on the inside of the Sngl is the Body Conduction Unit, which generates a gentle vibration that will pass through your hand and into your ear when you hold your finger against your head Track your fitness The Sgnl isn’t just sitting on your wrist doing nothing when you’re not receiving calls, the wearable also has a built in accelerometer to track your steps, which can you review in a companion app Bluetooth connectivity The Sgnl doesn’t have cellular radio, so can’t receive calls on its own. Instead it’s designed to work with your existing…

access_time2 min.
the ak xb10 solves your iphone 7’s headphone problem

Integrated amp Those audio signals are then passed to an amp, which in the XB10 boosts the weaker signals to give you a full and clear sound in your headphones 24-bit HD music The AK XB10 uses a Qualcomm Bluetooth codec to transmit 24-bit HD music – as long as the source device you’re using is aptX HD-compatible Integrated DAC Once the 1s and 0s have been transmitted wirelessly through the magic of Bluetooth, it’s the job of the digital-to-analogue converter to turn them into audio signals Headphone output All that remains is to plug in your 3.5mm or 2.5mm headphones and enjoy the audio streaming from your phone (or whichever device you’ve hooked up) As you have probably heard already, the iPhone 7 has ditched the headphone jack, pushing us all towards a wireless listening future. Astell…

access_time1 min.
top wireless earbuds

Jaybird X2 The Jaybird X2s have been picking up rave reviews since they launched last year, and they’re perfect for outdoor types. You can find them online for around £140. LG Tone Platinum If audio fidelity means more to you than your earbuds lasting the duration of a park run, then this offering from LG is ideal, with online prices at around £130. B&O Beoplay H5 Superb looks set these earbuds apart, and the Bang & Olufsen branding means you can expect an impressive level of audio quality too. They’re pricey though, at around £200. Moto Surround For a wallet-friendly option, try the Moto Surround earbuds, which offer great audio, good battery and waterproofing – they’re about £60.…

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