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Gourmet TravellerGourmet Traveller

Gourmet Traveller April 2019

Each issue is packed with great dish ideas, hot restaurants and bars, entertaining tips, the best hotels and lavish spreads on some of the world’s most intoxicating travel destinations - everything you should expect from the Australia's premier food and travel magazine.

Country:
Australia
Language:
English
Publisher:
Bauer Media Pty Ltd
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12 Issues

IN THIS ISSUE

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editor’s letter

Is there such a thing as too much chocolate? We don’t think so, though the Gourmet Traveller team has been looking at the world this past month through cocoa-coloured glasses. Like the best bars and bonbons (see our extensively tested buyer’s guide), our chocolate issue is rich and well-tempered, featuring chocolate sauce and mousse, cookies and Kugelhopf, and a masterclass in salted caramel, chocolate’s perfect partner in crime. And we head back to the bean at Haigh’s, the Adelaide factory making chocolate since 1915. (Fun fact: they produce 14 million chocolate speckles a year – but who’s counting). All this talk of cocoa butter and couverture got me thinking about the changing nature of indulgence. The ancient Maya and Aztecs believed the cocoa bean had magical, even divine, properties and for…

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where we’ve been

Helen Anderson, travel editor; Antarctic Peninsula Every moment on an Antarctic voyage (in this case aboard Ponant’s Le Soléal) is precious – every whale breach, every penguin parade, every iceberg awesome, in the true sense of that overused word. @handersonglobal David Matthews, senior editor; Hakuba, Japan Fifty centimetres of overnight snowfall in Hakuba means first tracks at any of the resort’s 10 zones. Cutting up the powder, of course, comes first, photos second. @matthematical_ Harriet Davidson, editorial coordinator; Cottage Point, NSW This was the GT team’s “view from the office” when we headed off on a road trip to film a series of videos featuring the new Mazda CX-5. @harriet.olive…

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contributors

JERRIE-JOY REDMAN-LLOYD stylist Flower power, p104 A food and prop stylist currently living in New York, Redman-Lloyd says she would jump on a plane every month if it meant working with Gourmet Traveller. And she did just that to style this month’s cauliflower feature. “The collaborative, creative energy that happens on a GT shoot is something I always strive for on my own sets here in New York,” she says. “And being able to graze on Lisa Featherby’s food makes it that much sweeter.” KENDALL HILL senior writer High life, low season, p134 The Austrian Alps, best known as a winter retreat of epic ski runs and élite resorts, are definitely open for summer, too. On an action-packed itinerary in the Arlberg region, Hill discovers superb gastronomy, diverse cultural events and exhilarating mountain hikes. “With…

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what we’re eating

SNACKS, Cutler & Co Savoury éclairs with dollops of fromage blanc, rosy thimbles of watermelon bolstered by balsamic vinegar, and whipped sobrasada piped onto paper-thin shards of toast, tempered by tiny rounds of radishes. In the hands of the kitchen at Cutler & Co, snacks become a masterclass in elegant simplicity. Cutler & Co, 55-57 Gertrude St, Fitzroy, Vic. MATTHEW HIRSCH, CONTRIBUTOR FLAT IRON & MUSTARD, Pilot Thin slices of char-grilled flatiron steak – rubbed with koji for tenderisation and an umami-boost – are plated alternately with house-pickled cucumber and dressed with dill and mustard. Classic steak, or deconstructed burger? Don’t overthink it. Just enjoy Malcolm Hanslow’s (Ester, Automata) exciting new cooking at this recent ACT opening. Pilot, 1 Wakefield Gardens, Ainslie, ACT. GARETH MEYER, CONTRIBUTOR ARGENTINIAN RIB-EYE, Crizia Pristine Patagonian seafood – the oysters…

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space invaders

Pussy cat, Tasmanian-style. Sweet and sour cane-toad legs. Fox tikka masala. Roast camel stuffed with goat and pheasants. Not your typical recipes, but then Eat the Problem isn’t a typical cookbook. Its author, curator and artist Kirsha Kaechele, calls her 544-page book an “artwork”. Its publisher, the outré Hobart institution MONA, calls it “a surrealist compendium of food and art”. It features “recipes” for cooking, eating and thinking about pests, along with poetry, essays and interviews that “reimagine what we think of as invasive”. Contributors include chefs (Enrique Olvera, Dominique Crenn and Heston Blumenthal among them), writers, scientists and artists, including Tim Minchin, James Turrell and Marina Abramovic. Kaechele traces the project to 2013 when she staged zero-waste markets on the museum’s roof. “We asked all the food-stall chefs to create dishes out…

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jet trails

A food lover’s greatest-hits journey by private jet across southern Australia ticks a lot of boxes in less than two weeks: private tours and long lunches at wineries in three states, shucking oysters at Coffin Bay, fine dining on Kangaroo Island and in Hobart, and whistlestops in Kalgoorlie and Coonawarra along the way. Captain’s Choice’s 13-day “Gourmet Trail of the Southern Coast” departs Perth on 14 September and ends in Hobart. It’s one of several free-range private-jet itineraries of Australia launched by the luxury travel company this year. captainschoice.com.au Ecuador’s ancient Nacional cacao was decimated by fungal disease in 1916 and thought to be extinct in its pure form, until its rediscovery in a remote valley. Since 2013, To’ak has produced limited-edition heirloom chocolate aged in casks – its Art Series…

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