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Harper's MagazineHarper's Magazine

Harper's Magazine June 2019

HARPER’S MAGAZINE, the oldest general interest monthly in America, explores the issues that drive our national conversation through such celebrated features as Readings, Annotation, and Findings, as well as the iconic Harper’s Index.

Country:
United States
Language:
English
Publisher:
Harper's Magazine Foundation
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12 Issues

IN THIS ISSUE

access_time1 min.
harper's magazine

John R. MacArthur, President and Publisher Editorial Director ELLEN ROSENBUSH Executive Editor CHRISTOPHER BEHA Managing Editor KATHERINE RYDER Senior Editors KATIA BACHKO, CHRISTOPHER CARROLL, WES ENZINNA, RACHEL POSER Art Director KATHRYN HUMPHRIES Editor Emeritus Lewis H. Lapham Washington Editor ANDREW COCKBURN Visuals Editor STACEY CLARKSON JAMES Poetry Editor BEN LERNER Web Editor VIOLET LUCCA Associate Editors ELIZABETH BRYANT, JOE KLOC, MATTHEW SHERRILL Assistant Editors WILL AUGEROT, MATTHEW HICKEY, ADRIAN KNEUBUHL, STEPHANIE MCFEETERS, WILL STEPHENSON Editorial Interns MADELINE FORBES, CAMERON FRENCH, EMILY SIMON, IAN STEVENSON Art Interns CAT DUFFY, GRETA RAINBOW Contributing Editors ANDREW J. BACEVICH, KEVIN BAKER, DAN BAUM, TOM BISSELL, JOSHUA COHEN, JOHN CROWLEY, TANYA GOLD, GARY GREENBERG, JACK HITT, EDWARD HOAGLAND, SCOTT HORTON, FREDERICK KAUFMAN, GARRET KEIZER, MARK KINGWELL, WALTER KIRN, RAFIL KROLL-ZAIDI, GIDEON LEWIS-KRAUS, RICHARD MANNING, CLANCY MARTIN, DUNCAN MURRELL, VINCE PASSARO, FRANCINE PROSE, JEFF SHARLET, CHRISTINE SMALLWOOD, ZADIE SMITH, REBECCA SOLNIT, MATTHEW STEVENSON, JOHN EDGAR WIDEMAN Contributing Artists OLIVE AYHENS, LISA ELMALEH, LENA HERZOG, AARON HUEY, SAMUEL JAMES,…

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letters

Brexit Wounds On the matter of Britain’s membership in the European Union, which Lionel Shriver discussed in her fascinating recent column [“No Exit,” Easy Chair, April], I am a reluctant Remainer. That is, I believed in what some described as the Remain campaign’s “Project Fear.” The opposition summoned a dystopia for us to regard as we voted: the end of all we love. Even so, I am not arrogant enough to expect British democracy to be scuppered to soothe my personal anxieties about what may happen with the lorries at the port of Dover or whether salad will make it down the A30 road to my home in Cornwall in the days after Brexit. The result of the 2016 referendum must be honored, although, as Shriver writes, it probably won’t be, due…

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easy chair

Last spring, the BBC officially took up a “50:50 challenge” to achieve an equal number of male and female experts on news and current-events shows within the following year. We’re seeing an upsurge in the insistence that women must constitute half of everyone doing anything, since underrepresentation in any arena or sector is surely a sign of unconscious bias, misogyny, or institutionalized sexism begging for instantaneous redress. Over the past year, I myself have been approached more frequently to appear on BBC radio and television. Has the uptick in these invitations been occasioned by some great elevation of my public profile or some meteoric increase in my expertise? No. I have become a more valuable commodity for the Corporation because—my first name notwithstanding—I am female. Hence the New York Times’ official…

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ars oblivionalis

By Lewis Hyde, from A Primer for Forgetting, out this month from Farrar, Straus and Giroux. ANTI-MNEMONICS Umberto Eco writes that “once, as a joke, some friends and I invented advertisements for university positions in nonexistent disciplines,” one of these being an ars oblivionalis, as opposed to the ancient arts of memory. Eco tells the story in an essay meant to prove that, from a semiotician’s point of view, no such art could possibly exist. Others would disagree. At one point in the Biographia Literaria, Samuel Taylor Coleridge complains about the habit of reading periodicals, suggesting that it should rightly be added to the “catalogue of Anti-Mnemonics,” a list of practices that weaken the memory, which he had found in the work of a Muslim scholar. These include: throwing to the ground lice picked…

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southern cone

By Carmen Giménez Smith, from Be Recorder, which will be published in August by Graywolf Press. I wept with my grandmother when Reaganwas shot because that’s what she wanted.At night, she’d tell me about a city builtby Evita for children in Buenos Aires, the cityof her first exile. Children went aboutmunicipal duties in the small post officeand city hall to learn to be good citizens.In Argentina she sold bread puddingand gave French and Englishlessons from herhome for money to buy shoes. She promisedwe’d go someday, but we never did. She’d sayPeruvians were gossipy, Argentineans snobbish, butChileans were above reproach. A little bit migrant,a little bit food insecurity, she was the brass bustof JFK on her altar, the holy card of Saint Anthonyon her TV. She was her green card and the…

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then again

By Jill Ciment, from The Other Half, a manuscript in progress rebutting the author’s 1996 memoir, Half a Life, which describes her relationship with her husband, whom she met when she was a teenager and he was forty-seven. Her latest novel, The Body in Question, will be published in June by Pantheon Books. What do I call him? My husband? I would if the story were about how we met and married, shared meals for forty-five years, raised a puppy, endured illnesses. But if the story is about an older man preying on a teenager, shouldn’t I call him the artist, or, better still, the art teacher, with all that the word “teacher” implies? On the last night of his art class, I stayed after the others left to get his advice…

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