EXPLOREMY LIBRARY
Food & Wine
Martha Stewart Living

Martha Stewart Living October 2015

We've expanded our magazine to bring you more of the ideas you want for organizing, entertaining, cooking, and decorating- all in one place. Plus, our special Gardening issue, Entertaining Issue, Decorating Issue and Holiday issue are all yours to enjoy as a subscriber.

Country:
United States
Language:
English
Publisher:
Meredith Corporation
Frequency:
Monthly
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10 Issues

in this issue

1 min.
martha’s month

IN SEASON Apples and pears aren’t the only fall fruits—try their relative, the quince. The flesh is tart, even astringent, when raw, but cooking coaxes out its sweetness. Quinces are delicious in desserts and savory dishes. Find our favorites at marthastewart.com/quince-recipes. HALLOWEEN TRICK Long-Lasting Jack-o’-Lanterns For a decoration you can enjoy year after year, start with a Fun-Kin. The realistic faux pumpkins, made of low-density foam, carve like the real thing but with a lot less mess. To use one as a candy dish, carve a wide mouth and place a bowl inside for treats. Fun-Kins, from $20 each, store.funkins.com. PHOTOGRAPH BY VALENTYN VOLKOV/ALAMY; ILLUSTRATION BY BROWN BIRD DESIGN…

2 min.
out&about

AMERICAN MADE MARKET Hand-dipped from a beeswax blend, these tapers from Creative Candles light up any room with a slow, smokeless, dripless burn. For details and more artisanal items, browse our American Made eBay Market. ebay.com/americanmade INSTAGRAM FAVORITE Thanks to all who shared photos of creative Halloween costumes! We were seriously spooked, especially by @artzagram’s Day of the Dead ensemble. For the chance to see your photos in our magazine, follow us on Instagram. @marthastewart COLLECTING The trivets of the past often had three legs to protect pots and kettles over an open flame. While they’re now more often used as serving pieces to protect tabletops from hot dishes, many continue to be made of cast iron, and their latticework designs still look beautiful on any table. Look for these and brass examples at flea markets or…

3 min.
where is he now?

THE LIGHT CHANGES in fall. Richer and warmer, it comes at you less directly, a result of the earth’s tilt as it makes its way around the sun. You are, quite literally, seeing everything in a different light. Here at Living, we, too, are seeing things anew. In “Mastering the Art of Collecting” (page 76), Martha shares her lifelong passion for copper pots and pans, traditional cookware that suddenly feels fresh again. In “Return to Splendor” (page 84), marigolds, often deemed ordinary or old-fashioned, play a starring role in the ongoing revival of Untermyer Gardens, a lush estate in Yonkers, New York. This issue isn’t just about rekindling old trends, though. It’s also about approaching traditions from new perspectives. For instance, in “Mix Masters” (page 102), we spotlight two beautiful kitchens that…

2 min.
tips and techniques

Golden Rules of Polishing 1. Be gentle. Polishing wears off small amounts of metal each time, a crucial consideration for plated pieces—you can eventually rub right through the plating. Don’t polish away patina: If you work hard to remove the tarnish from every crevice in a silverware pattern, for example, you’re reducing the contrasts of dark and light that show off that pattern. 2. Use a good-quality product formulated for the specific metal (“all-purpose” polishes can be too harsh). Chemical dips are generally too strong and should be avoided. 3. Look for a previous polishing pattern—often up-and-down on cutlery and circular on pots or other large pieces—and follow it. 4. Use soft cotton cloths to polish; old T-shirts work well. Reserve a different cloth for each metal so you don’t mix products. 5. Don’t be…

8 min.
break the mold

You can visually anchor your bed with a faux-headboard that’s easy—and inexpensive—to put together. The trick? Window- or door-casing molding, available at any home center or hardware store. The length of each strip will depend on the width and size of the bed. Here, we created a 48-by-70-inch frame for a queen-size bed, using three 5-inchwide strips (the vertical strips should reach the baseboards). Cut the strips to size with a miter box and saw. Tack them in place every six inches with a trim nail, then spackle the holes. Finally, paint the strips the same shade as the wall, but in a different finish for a subtle pop. Primed MDF door and window casing (similar to shown), $10.50 for 96", homedepot.com. Whim five-piece comforter set, by Martha Stewart Collection, in…

7 min.
reboot your routine

A BETTER ANGLE It’s hard to pinpoint the origin of the first makeup brushes (was it the Romans? the Egyptians?), but the straight-handled shape hasn’t changed much since ancient times. The latest iterations finally take the task of makeup application into the 21st century. Ergonomically designed bent heads make these models as intuitive to use as your fingers, while soft bristles, clustered into a rounded shape, effortlessly buff in foundation and blend in color cosmetics without leaving telltale lines. TRY Artis Fluenta collection (shown), from $36 each, neimanmarcus.com. M.A.C Oval brushes, from $32 each, maccosmetics.com. OIL RUSH Potent seed-based oils (think argan and apricot) have been all the rage lately for delivering extra moisture into face creams and hair treatments. Now formulators have figured out a way to infuse them into makeup—so every quick…